Rosalind Russell: The “Goat Lady” has changed the lives of many Nepalese woman & children 

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Rosalind Russell is surprisingly glamorous for a woman known as “The Goat Lady.” And while the nickname is accurate (Russell estimates 15,000 goats have been dispersed throughout villages in Nepal as a result of her work), it doesn’t tell the whole story. For that we’d have to attach additional words like “school” and “self-sustaining” and “female empowerment” to her nickname. For Russell has not only boosted needy villagers’ earning power with goats, she has changed their lives.

Finding Rabindra in Nepal

Back in 1988 Russell was traveling the world, visiting places she found of “spiritual interest.” She was in India when she met a friend who convinced her to see Nepal. “It was glorious,” she remembers. But the grinding poverty that she was grateful to have left behind in India was certainly present in Nepal.

While exploring Nepal, Russell met an 11-year-old boy named Rabindra. He stood out from all the other street urchins she encountered. “He had the best English,” says Russell. Rabindra convinced his new friend to let him show her around. “We just really liked each other,” explains Russell.  

 

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Rosalind Russell, aka The Goat Lady, and Founder and Director of R Star Foundation

Eventually, he invited her to meet his family. Russell first met the boy’s grandmother, who was resting at their Kathmandu home following cataract surgery. She recalls being dismayed to see the poverty in which they lived. Her hosts generously offered her some popcorn to eat and, while she wasn’t inclined to accept it, she says, “I could not say no.” This would not be the last time Russell found it hard to say “no” to Rabindra.

Making an empty promise that wasn’t

Over the two weeks they spent together, Russell and Rabindra formed quite a friendship. “I had really bonded with this kid,” she says. As she prepared to go back home to Laguna, Russell says she promised Rabindra she would return someday. But, she admits, it was a false promise. 

She had seen enough suffering. Whatever her plans were going forward they did not include a return visit to Nepal. “I was never returning to that country,” she says. Russell flew home to her husband ready for her next adventure.

Coming home to a new, unforeseen adventure

Once home there was definitely a new adventure waiting for her. Unfortunately, it wasn’t one she was prepared for. Her husband asked her for a divorce. So, Russell did what people frequently do in that kind of situation, she reassessed. “My whole life had changed,” she says. 

She contemplated going back to medical school (she had previously dropped out halfway through) but realized she didn’t really like it. She thought about becoming a vet because she loves animals. However, she couldn’t shake the voice in her head that kept repeating “ministry.” She eventually listened to that voice and became ordained as a minister in 1992. “I was one of the first straight ministers doing gay marriages,” she says with pride.

 

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Rosalind Russell holding a photo of herself with some of the Nepalese villagers her organization works with

Her ministry work kept her very busy as she performed both weddings and funerals. She even started a prison ministry that is now in its 37th year. Her longest running congregant has been with her for 27 years, and only one of the men she ministered to has returned to prison after his release. 

Finally, keeping her word – and bringing goats

Throughout all of this, there was still Rabindra. Even though it had been many years since Rabindra had seen his American “mom,” he never forgot Russell’s promise to return. (Rabindra started calling Russell “mom” with his own mother’s blessing. He explained to Russell that his mother said, “Yes, sure, she’s your mom too. She would die for you.”) Rabindra was insistent that Russell keep her promise and return to see him. “Mom, when are you coming over?” he would ask repeatedly. Russell finally acquiesced.

Since she was going to return to Nepal, Russell decided she wanted to arrive with gifts for Rabindra and his family. “I decided to bring goats,” she says after remembering how Rabindra spoke of their importance. Plus, “They’re in our backyard (grazing the hills in Laguna), and I’m a Capricorn and they’re kind of goat-like, so that’s how the whole goat thing started,” explains Russell, as if everyone would, of course, come to the same conclusion.

Not everyone thought goats were a great idea

 Rabindra was not impressed with his “mom’s” plan. “That’s stupid,” Russell recalls him opining about the goats. Nevertheless, she remained undeterred and 200 goats were delivered to two villages upon her return to Nepal. 

Two goats each were given to the women in the villages. They were ecstatic, but there were strings attached. In order to receive this gift, the villagers had to promise they would give away a goat. “It’s a pay it forward program,” explains Russell. The gift was accompanied by a micro-financing program. Another caveat: everyone had to work together. In the Hindu caste society this is no small order. And yet, though she was met with some resistance at first regarding both caveats, Russell says, “This has changed their hearts.” 

First goats, then a school

After such a successful return to a place she really hadn’t wanted to ever see again, one would hardly fault Russell if that were the end of her charitable acts. After all, in her one visit she had done more for total strangers than most people ever think about doing.

However, the goats were not going to be the end of it for Russell. One of her friends, upon hearing about the goats and the largely illiterate villagers who received them, suggested that the village needed a school. “I should have never listened to her!” laughs Russell. But she did. And now a TOWN-N school, catering to pre-school up to fifth grade, exists as a result of her work. Girls attend free of charge, and the children are taught in English, and are exposed to the outside world with Kindles and books. “The kids are testing in the top 10 percent. It’s outrageous,” exclaims Russell proudly.

A personal loss followed by a global one

And how nice if the story ended there. Unfortunately, two catastrophic events took place -- one global, the other personal – that forced Russell to reassess and adapt again. The first was personal. In 2008 Russell’s home of 29 years burned down. She fought the insurance company for years only to come away with virtually nothing. Now she lives in a one-room pool house. And yet she and her R Star Foundation never wavered from her Nepalese mission. She speaks of her loss as just that, something she lost. As one who has seen true suffering, third world suffering, she has decided that this event that caused her financial devastation was unfortunate, but not tragic.

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In her spare time, Russell trained her Abyssinian cat, above, to walk on a leash

The second event she definitely classifies as tragic. In 2015 Nepal was hit with an earthquake that killed an estimated 10,000 people and injured well over 22,000 people. The country has yet to recover. And this has changed R Star’s mission, but just a little. Russell says that while the earthquake struck on April 24, by April 28, Rabindra was leading the charge to deliver supplies to the villages. By June 2, the school was reopened. However, much of the infrastructure has not been rebuilt and this has handcuffed R Star and what it can do.

Working with limitations

Rather than acquiring more goats, Russell says the group has turned to a professional goat judge, Dan Laney. He is helping the villagers care for the goats they have. “He teaches them how to do hoofing, and things like that,” says Russell. The group has built 30 greenhouses as well as organized a coat drive to help keep the villagers warm since their houses, rebuilt since the quake, are subpar for the harsh environment.

An entire separate column could be written specifying all the things R Star has done – and continues to do – for the people in Nepal. Every dollar they raise goes to the mission. The group is adaptable, practical and, looking for “outstanding Board members.” 

And if I really wanted to keep it going, I could write about all the other community organizations Russell belongs to (trust me, it’s a lot). But, perhaps, that will be another story. This story is about a woman who has turned personal setbacks into a truly meaningful life’s work. Russell, herself, is quick to give credit to others, but it’s clear she is the driving force. So let’s give credit where credit is due. 

Despite telling me unabashedly that, “Poverty isn’t my pleasure,” Russell has unflinchingly continued to battle against it, even in the face of great personal loss. “We’ve gotten very good at what we do,” she says. “Now, I even like my moniker, “The Goat Lady.” And that’s fortunate, because there are a lot of people in Nepal who are hoping the woman it belongs to, is around for a long time.


A Life Rewritten: How a devastating diagnosis has put 

Summer Tarango’s future into sharper focus

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photography by Mary Hurlbut

Last July, Summer Tarango’s life looked fulfilling, at least from the outside. She was the operations manager at zpizza, a satisfying job she’d held for 14 years. She owned her own catering company. Her relationship with longtime boyfriend, Ed Benrock (a drummer for Jamestown Revival), stood on solid ground. Summer had a posse of good friends, two close sisters, and a strong bond with her mother. “I was happy,” Summer says, looking back. “But nothing was exciting. I was going through the motions.” 

Summer and Ed celebrated the Fourth of July weekend with a bike ride in Austin, Texas. She admits to some trepidation, but – true to her nature – Summer seemed up for anything, and didn’t want to put a damper on the day by confessing any fears. 

The ride ended with a bad fall. Summer suffered a significant laceration on her forehead and a banged-up knee, though nothing that time and stitches shouldn’t resolve. As the months wore on, however, the knee didn’t heal. Doctors suspected an infection. 

When Summer discovered a lump in her armpit, they feared the infection had spread. Afraid to pierce the lump and risk spreading it further, they waited…and waited, treating her with antibiotics. Nothing improved. Finally, before sending Summer off to an infectious disease specialist, her doctor performed a biopsy to rule out anything significant. They weren’t worried, they said, but they wanted to cover their bases.

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Smiling Summer presents a pretty picture worthy of her name

As Summer sat alone in a parking lot on her way to work the Friday before Thanksgiving, the call came. Summer, at 42 years of age, had stage 3C triple-negative breast cancer – and it was aggressive. Further testing revealed she also had the BRCA mutation. Treatment, she was told, could not wait. Within two weeks, Summer had begun her first round of chemotherapy.

A triple-negative diagnosis and the BRCA gene mutation

Triple-negative breast cancer is more common in younger patients, and more common still in women with the BRCA gene. The three typical receptors that fuel breast cancer – estrogen, progesterone, and the HER-2 gene – are not present in these types of tumors. The result is that common treatment methods – hormone therapy and other drugs – that target those receptors can’t be used. This cancer tends to be more aggressive, though still responsive to chemotherapy.

A BRCA mutation is a change in either of two genes – BRCA1 or BRCA2 – that prevents that gene from working properly. Both BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppressor genes. Summer is the only woman in her family with the mutation.

All this adds up to a complicated diagnosis, and a long and grueling treatment plan utilizing a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. That would be difficult for any patient to hear. For Summer, coming from a background rooted in holistic medicine, her choice was made even harder.

Mother of all healing

Summer’s mother, Vijaya Stern, teaches and practices Ayurvedic medicine in Laguna Beach. Ayurveda is one of the world’s oldest holistic healing systems, developed approximately 5,000 years ago in India. It’s based on the belief that health and wellness depend on a delicate balance between the mind, body, and spirit. 

“When the soul is hindered by the divisive nature of the ego, ‘dis-ease’ begins to manifest,” says Vijaya Stern on her website, www.livingrasa.com. 

Vijaya has studied this ancient healing practice since the late 1970s, when Summer was a toddler. At her Living Rasa studio, she offers healing, yoga, classes, and retreats. Vijaya’s patients are treated with herbs, not pharmaceutical drugs. Health is managed with diet, meditation, yoga, and other natural practices. 

Western medicine – particularly aggressive and invasive treatments like chemotherapy – is obviously in direct opposition to Ayurveda’s philosophy. Even the antibiotics Summer took for that initial knee infection were her first experience with Western medicine. Vijaya’s beliefs are clear: “Ayurveda sees all of creation as the Mother herself.” 

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Summer finds meditation calming, and combines Western and holistic/ayurvedic approaches to help her heal

“Going through chemo is not what she would have wanted [for me],” Summer says. “I told her, This is what I’m doing, and you have to accept my choice. She does, but she struggles with it.”

Summer’s diagnosis has been an amazing teacher for both mother and daughter, she says. “I thought we were so close, and we are, but we’re getting challenged. I don’t invite her to chemo. I can’t expect her to watch that happen. But I’ve found the places where she can be of assistance: dietary help, or just giving me attention and love.”

East meets west

Summer is embracing both ends of the medical spectrum on her journey to recovery. Perhaps that’s not uncommon. But, in Summer’s case, it feels a bit more urgent and necessary. She draws strength from her mother’s practice, following a strict diet as best she can, incorporating yoga and other spiritual practices. 

Summer works with an integrative medicine specialist, receiving Vitamin C infusions, weekly B12 shots, and other alternative supplements and strategies. She uses an app called “Insight Timer” for guided meditations and relaxing music, which I went home to download and now use myself. 

But she’s also enduring the debilitating rounds of chemotherapy (including a particularly aggressive regimen of a drug called “The Red Devil,” which is even worse than it sounds). And she’s planning ahead for a future full of more chemo, radiation, and surgery. 

“When I was diagnosed my first thought was, I’m going to be so inspirational to people. I’m going to show everyone how to cook. I’m going to stick to the Keto diet my doctor wants me on. I was going to show everyone how you can be so amazing during cancer. But chemo kicked my ass. Most days, I’m just trying to get any food in,” Summer says.

“Now I’m giving myself some grace. That plan didn’t happen, and it’s okay. I’m getting out of bed, getting dressed, and saying ‘yes’ to things. Just getting through is a victory.”

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Summer finds comfort in the natural beauty surrounding her mother’s home

As Summer tells this story, I find her authenticity far more inspirational than her original plan. Strength in the face of crisis takes many different forms, and “success” has shifting definitions. Discovering our limitations, accepting them with grace, and finding new ways to accommodate them…that strikes me as success.

A healing circle: the defining moment

About a month back, Vijaya held a healing circle for Summer. Thirty two women spanning several generations (from their 30s to their 70s), some close to Summer and some close to her mother, gathered in Vijaya’s home. They shared their hopes for her, as well as their observations of how Summer impacts their lives.

One friend told Summer she was the chain in their friendship necklace, gathering beads of women and stringing them together to create something unique and beautiful. “It’s the most incredible thing I’ve ever experienced,” Summer says.

A friend of Vijaya’s performed Reiki, a Japanese practice that promotes physical wellbeing through the laying on of hands, using touch to activate the body’s natural healing process. “Because of the Reiki, I was so incredibly present,” says Summer. She describes the music, the incense, the whipping of an eagle feather over her head, transporting herself back to the moment as she’s describing it.

“I’d never been that present in my life,” she says. “Six months ago, I don’t know if I could have taken that in. Now I was able to look in every woman’s eyes and listen. Before, I would have been self-deprecating. Now I need it. I need the love and energy. How else will I get through this?”

It’s clear, in our time together, that this moment marked a defining change in Summer’s life. “I didn’t know an experience like this existed,” she said. “And now I want more. I want to live in that moment.” 

Meaningful conversations: A Soulful Project

Summer also wants more meaningful conversations. Before her diagnosis, she’d been working with Summer Meek from Soul Project on ways to forge deeper connections with women. Summer is part of what she laughingly calls a coven – 13 girlfriends whom she’s carefully strung on her friendship chain. 

The dinners are intended to gather women together for meaningful discussions about soulful topics. In other words, not your typical ladies-night-out-wine-and-gossip. It’s a chance to be real with each other – vulnerable, authentic, and honest.

Summer looks forward to the day when she’s strong enough to make those dinners happen. In the meantime, she stays close to her coven. The women all show up for her in different and important ways. I ask how her diagnosis has changed her relationships with friends. “It’s just exaggerated things that were already there,” she says. For the good and the bad.

Summer’s Backyard Barbecue

In the meantime, before the Soul Project dinners and intense conversations, Summer is celebrating life with a Backyard Barbecue intended to raise money for her treatments. On Sunday, May 20 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., friends, family and anyone interested can join in at the Blinking Owl Distillery in Santa Ana. Ed’s band, Jamestown Revival, will play. Nirvana Grille will support the event (Summer’s sister, Lindsay, is the chef and co-owner of Nirvana). 

To learn more about how to attend or participate, visit www.youcaring.com/summertarango-1171518.

A life being lived, a story being rewritten

Not every narrative has an easy ending, and Summer’s story is still in progress, a new page written each day. There are a lot of unknowns. But there are also a few beautiful certainties. 

“I don’t see the point of working my way through this just to go back to a mundane life. What’s the point?” she says. “This is really hard. Chemo is hard. Here’s the chance to work through relationships, create the life I want, and explore my wildest dreams. What brings me deep joy? How can I bring these experiences that I’ve had to other women? I won’t finish this and go back to life as it was. I’m already seeing glimpses of it. It already looks totally different.”

Now and again, life forces us into a wormhole. Challenges arise that push us through some painful portal that changes us forever. Looking back from the other side – 

with the perspective gained from an intense experience, instead of the inevitable slow roll of time – our old lives can almost seem unrecognizable. Call it wisdom, call it personal growth, call it a gift. Not everyone gets it. 

It’s not easy to learn vicariously through others’ obstacles. But it’s worth reminding ourselves to pay attention, and to stop accepting the status quo if it’s no longer serving us. Other ways of living are within reach, if only we’re willing to stretch ourselves, take risks, and seize opportunities. That seemed to be the lesson embedded in Summer’s story. 

As Summer faces life’s biggest question – What’s the point? – I’m certain she won’t stop until she finds her answer. In many ways, maybe she already has.


Larry Ricci: Embedded in Laguna’s LGBTQ culture, then and now

Story by DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

During the time Larry Ricci owned his interior design firm, he was known as the “Spaceman,” because when he walked into a space, he knew, “It’s my canvas, I see what it’s going to be, and I execute it.”

Odd, and yet an apt nickname. In 1972, when he came to Laguna Beach, it’s as if he decided this would be the space, the canvas upon which he was going to design and build his life; one that included being an artist, musician, singer, songwriter, producer, original member of the Board of Directors for the Orange County Chapterof ISID, original board member of The Heritage and Culture Committee, and founder of Club Q. (And more endeavors that he didn’t get around to talking about during our interview.)

Creation of Club Q

We meet at Susi Q, where almost five years ago, he presented the idea of a club for LGBTQ seniors, a now thriving group, Club Q, whose slogan is, “A social club for the LGBTQ community and friends.” 

When I first interviewed Larry, a year ago, a monumental event had just taken place, one that affected him deeply. On May 9, 2017, the Laguna Beach City Council proclaimed June as LGBT Heritage and Culture Month. Larry says that as the last sentence of the proclamation was read, “Forever the month of June is recognized as LGBT month…” it was very emotional. The forever did it for him. “It was the first time I felt respected for who I am instead of being discriminated against for who I am.” 

And it’s apparent the words still resonate with him. He’s been waiting to hear them for a long time.

Arriving in Laguna Beach in 1972

Larry landed in Laguna after moving from his birthplace, Seattle, WA, to Huntington Beach in 1971, arriving here a year later. “This is where I came out in my adult gay life,” he says. “I met all these wonderful people and a huge community and within it, magnificent art and artists.” During the 1970s and 1980s, he was very involved in the art world and knew most of the LGBTQ artists. 

Recently, he found a way to celebrate them, with the first exhibition to feature art provided by LGBTQ artisans, “Harmony Art Exhibit.” 

Larry says, “I approached Susi Q when I knew the exhibit’s theme would be harmony, peace and unity. A lot of LGBTQ artists certainly helped shape the art culture in Laguna Beach. The idea was extremely well accepted by Susi Q and Gallery Q. The exhibit will feature current pieces, as well as historical works, from LGBTQ artists in the community. I was able to acquire many pieces from the 1960s forward to honor those decades in which the LGBTQ artists really did help shape the art colony as it exists today.” 

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Larry gets snacks ready for Club Q’s Movie Day

Scheduled in conjunction with Laguna’s Pride Month, “Harmony Art Exhibit” will be presented by Gallery Q at Susi Q (in the multi-purpose room) from May 7 - June 29, with the official reception on Friday, May 11 from 5 - 6:30 p.m. 

Three pieces from Larry’s own collection – by artists Pegi Wear, Barbara Brown, and Orlando Botero – will be included in the exhibit. His close friends, Wear and Brown (who are both now deceased), owned Contemporary Arts Gallery on the corner of Myrtle and PCH (the A-frame building) in the 1970s. Larry admits he drove by there not long ago, and thought, “Well, girls, we have one more show to do.”

Time now measured in decades

“I talk of time now in decades,” Larry says. And admittedly, he’s done quite a lot in over four of them.

During the ‘80s, he painted abstract mixed-media pieces that were shown in two galleries. As if that’s not enough, every Friday and Saturday for four years in the mid-‘80s, Larry and Jim Harding performed at Main Street Café, which was a piano bar at the time, sporting a grand piano, no less. Larry played the piano and sang, and Jim played the bass guitar and sang. “We did cover music from the ‘80s and some of my original songs,” Larry says. “I can still picture the crowd around the piano.”

In the ‘90s, he was a production designer on a short film and a feature film (for which he wrote the title song). 

For 25 years, he owned an interior design firm in Corona del Mar, and traveled all around the country designing: shopping malls, gourmet markets, funeral homes, retirement homes, yachts, and corporate buses. He freelanced for another 10 years after that, and while on a lengthy assignment in Alabama, he owned a 26,000 square foot Antique Mall and Consignment store. He now consults, proving true the adage he relates, “Designers never quit, they die.”

Stepping away as facilitator of Club Q

Now he’s embarking on yet another chapter. As of June 1, the fifth anniversary of Club Q, Larry has decided to “step away” from his position as full time facilitator. “Due to new commitments with work responsibilities,” he says. “It was an extremely difficult decision to make, because I’ve had this up and running for five years. And having been its founder, it’s hard to let go.”

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Club Q Movie Day, the third Friday of each month

Larry explains the plan for Club Q after he steps aside, “There have been multiple conversations and networking with other LGBTQ organizations. Three other groups, Shanti OC, LGBTQ Center OC, and the LGBTQ Heritage and Culture Committee, will be involved in upcoming gatherings of the Club. In co-partnering with these other organizations and services, each will take over one of the designated time periods a month. We have the first and third Friday afternoons of the month, and these groups will be woven in at these times to bring in more people. They will rotate in on the first Friday, and the third Friday will still be Club Q movie day. Susi Q will facilitate until a new steering committee is created.” 

He says of the new format, “It’s the arms and fingers of five years of networking, bringing these organizations in to Susi Q to be with LGBTQ family and friends.”

The Club Q members look forward to new and exciting adventures with Club Q, but, of course, they will miss the leadership they had with Larry. 

And, yes, he will still be part of Club Q, but as a member.

A time of celebration, a time of sorrow

The more one learns about Laguna’s rich gay culture of the past 40 plus years, the more it appears to embody periods of absolute joy or absolute grief. As described by Larry, it was a dizzying and dazzling life in Laguna in the ‘70s, a mecca of energy and artistry, and then came the impenetrable sorrow of the ‘80s and ‘90s.

Larry recalls those times, “In 1984, along with Ed Smith, Jim Reed, and Rick Hernandez, we put on a musical review in Jim Reed’s house from 11 p.m. to midnight and raised $26,000 as seed money for AIDS Services Foundation (ASF). The next year, we held it at the Woman’s Club and raised $100,000 for ASF. We skipped a year, and then in 1987, we raised $150,000 for them.”

An unforgettable walk

On December 1, 2017, I had the privilege of going on an unforgettable walk with Larry and members of Club Q to the police station to deliver toys for Spark of Love, and then to Main Beach for the commemoration of World AIDS Day. The day and evening, (which also included Hospitality Night), involved a strange juxtaposition of emotions. In the amount of time it took to reach the cobblestones at the beach, joy melded into sadness, as Larry and Ric Uggs related the stories of what it was like back then. 

Larry said, “I’ll never forget that 10-15 years of constant loss. In the early 1980s, we worried when someone said they weren’t feeling well. Because it seemed to happen quickly after that. They’d be gone in 30, 60 or 90 days. I was in the interior design business and many of design shops closed because the proprietors died. We’re here to celebrate those lives and grieve their deaths.”

Attendees at the ceremony were asked to write the names of friends and family members who died from AIDS on small pink hearts. 

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On June 1, Larry steps away as Club Q facilitator

Visibly shaken, Larry told me, “I started writing down the names of my friends, and I got to six, and I couldn’t go on. Back when they started dying, and the number got to 30, I said I don’t know what to do. A friend gave me some good advice. ‘Larry, stop counting.’”

Then a group of four people read the names of those who died, and a small bell rang after each name. And then the moderator asked for people to call out the names of those they knew who hadn’t been mentioned. Between Larry and Ric, they called out another 30 or more names. 

“These were sons, children, husbands, and wives. It’s not just a gay disease and never was,” Larry said.

Since 1972, Larry has both lived as part of and been witness to the LGBTQ culture in Laguna, a historian of the times. And his achievements – the founding of Club Q and now the co-partnering with other LGBTQ organizations, the first exhibition of LGBTQ art, and his role as one of the original board members of the Heritage Culture Committee – speak to the multifaceted life he’s led, the joy and grief of it all. 

In every case, he saw what could be, and he made it happen.


Pastor Rod Echols: Raised in Memphis, he loves Laguna and the Neighborhood Congregational Church

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Just when Pastor Rod Echols decided he was ready to become a full time pastor, Laguna’s Neighborhood Congregational Church reached out to him. “I was approached by this church right when I started my search,” recounts Pastor Rod. Not intimately familiar with Laguna Beach, Pastor Rod says it did check one of his non-negotiable boxes: it was in southern California. So he did some research. “I started looking into the community. It was so strong, so progressive...It was evolving onto everything I wanted to be as a pastor. I was honored to be hired.” 

Finding the right place to make a big change

Now, with almost a year of full-time ministry behind him, Pastor Rod is nothing if not enthusiastic about the future. “I feel, especially being so new in my role, like a kid in a candy store.” He has embraced the city’s quirks, and is delighted to be in a community that is so close-knit. “I’ve never served in a town like Laguna. It’s a town that values conservation, healthy living; it has strong connections and values. You can feel it here; it’s so strong. I really love that.”

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Pastor Rod Echols of the Neighborhood Congregational Church

Finding it easy to honor his mother’s wishes

Pastor Rod is a member of the United Church of Christ (UCC). The UCC is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination. It is known for being socially progressive with an emphasis on interfaith efforts. As for how he came to be a pastor, he says with a laugh, “I was toldI was going to be a pastor.” Raised in Memphis, Echols says his mother had plans for her son. Those plans included him being part of the church, albeit a different church than the one he represents now, and not just as member of the congregation. It didn’t take long for his mother’s wishes to take root. “I had the desire very early,” he recalls. 

Leaving Memphis for Brown University

Another one of his mother’s wishes was that he seize his opportunities. This meant leaving Memphis to attend Brown University in Rhode Island. Echols originally planned on becoming a doctor. However, once there he says his eyes were opened to a wider world-view. All of this newness profoundly affected him. “There were so many different people and beliefs. I found myself going back to where I started.” He became an informal, in-house pastor to his fellow classmates, and this planted the seed. 

Seeing religion through a new lens

What helped the seed flourish were some of Echols’ professors at Brown. “They blew my mind,” he remembers. “They exploded the categories. Christ, salvation, love, grace…they made them more inclusive, more colorful.” This inspired him to go to Boston University for graduate school where he received a Master of Divinity. “Without them, without their persistence – and it was very strong persistence – I would not be here now,” he says with a laugh.

Despite his faith and the calling to serve, Echols’ paying job was that of a professional fundraiser. He has worked for universities and non-profits, like the United Way. A job with the University of California San Diego brought him west. 

Seeking counsel to take a very big step

Then he had an epiphany, of sorts. “In 2010 I shared my heart with the pastor at Fairview Church in Costa Mesa,” he says. He had been a volunteer pastor there for many years. “I opened up to her and expressed my feelings and my story to her. I started as a conservative, fundamentalist, black preacher and had become an open, affirming man of faith.” And he wanted to preach. “I knew my calling was to make this step.”

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Inside the lovely Neighborhood Congregational Church at 340 St. Ann’s Drive

A love for something greater, kindness and social justice

He believes he is well-suited to make an impact as a church leader because of his focus on three things: one is a “proactive” commitment to loving and worshipping something greater than one’s self; the second is a focus on kindness; and the third is a fierce belief in social justice. “I feel strongly for people who don’t have the built-in advantages that other people have. People of color, the homeless, the LGBQT community…I want to help people searching for wholeness. These are the things that drew me into being a pastor as opposed to staying where I was.”

These tenets of his belief fuel his ambitions for the Neighborhood Congregational Church. “I want this church to be an indispensable part of the community. I want our kids to have a safe place for nurturing. Here, we are seeking wisdom together.”

The World Peace and Justice Weekend, June 9-10

To that end, the weekend of June 9 and 10, the church is hosting its first World Peace and Justice weekend. Pastor Rod describes the weekend as “an embodiment of seeking wisdom. It’s active. You are embodying peace in action.” There will be interfaith dialogue and meditation, a hands-on justice initiative and a concert benefitting world causes, as well as a presentation on compassionate parenting.

A deep gratitude for his parents

Pastor Rod speaks devotedly about his own parents. “My mom is so proud of me. Her strong faith is now my strong faith. Her passion for helping others is my passion, Her kind soul is what I’m trying to be for the church,” he says. He is equally grateful to his father. “He has been a real rock for me. He is my practical guide. He has been so tremendous.” Pastor Rod hopes to pass on their example to his own family someday, but first he needs to find the right woman. And it would be a plus if she loved IMAX movies and comic books, as he does, though it’s certainly not a requirement.

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Historic plaque welcomes congregants to the Neighborhood Congregational Church

Making the NCC a vibrant part of the community

In the meantime, Pastor Rod will put his considerable energy into growing the Neighborhood Congregational Church and making it a vibrant part of the community.

When I ask him to describe the United Church of Christ he says this, “An old pastor friend of mine used to tell this joke: UCC stands for Unitarians Considering Christ.’” Pastor Rod insists that it’s funny (my religious ignorance made glaringly obvious by the fact that he had to assure me of its humor). But he went on to explain that while we could debate the joke’s humor, it was a fairly accurate description of the UCC. 

“It’s not rigid or closed off. It speaks to the idea that Christ is a unifying force. Some call it Buddha, some call it a spirit, some call it light. We call it Christ.” 

This is what Pastor Rod believes. He also believes in the power of his church to be a unifying voice in these fractured times. “What we are seeking to do, our goal, is to orient ourselves as the sacred gathering space for seeking wisdom in Laguna Beach and the wider community,” he explains. An ambitious goal, to be sure, but one to which Pastor Rod is committed.


Corwin Allard (10), calm and confident kid extraordinaire, is a TV and baseball star

Story by DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

There’s never been a more dauntless and collected kid than Corwin Allard in my view. During our conversation, I was tempted to ask his mother if she’s certain that he’s not really a small adult masquerading as a ten-year-old. Corwin juggles two demanding pursuits, as a TV actor and as an award-winning pitcher on Big West BPA Travel Baseball Team, while at the same time maintaining straight As in his fourth-grade subjects at Top of the World Elementary. 

All these responsibilities would put even an adult into a tizzy, but Corwin handles them as if it’s life as usual. And for him, it is. Nothing ruffles him, it seems. Just the weekend before, his Travel Baseball Team won the Big West 10U Elite DI Triple Crown Spring Championship Arizona Tournament (a three-day national tournament). 

But he had no time to rest on his laurels.

On the road again

After the tournament ended on Sunday at 6:30 p.m., he and his parents, Chris and Diane Allard, packed up and rushed back to Laguna, arriving after 12:30 a.m. With only time for a quick bit of shuteye, he and his mom then got back on the road at 6:30 a.m. for an 8:30 a.m. call for a guest shot on the finale of the long-running (nine seasons) ABC sitcom, The Middle.Whew!

How he got started on this-fast paced acting track began with a much younger Corwin sitting in front of the television watching live action shows on Nickelodeon and the Disney Channel, and deciding, “I can do that.” It appears that once he sets his mind to something, it happens.

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With the support of his parents, Chris and Diane, Corwin does it all

Soon after, he got an agent (he still has the same agent and manager). He then appeared in the 2014 movie, All I Want for Christmas, in 2017 as Decker Jr in the Cartoon Network series Decker, and then as Peter Gardiner, neighbor to the Huang family in the ABC sitcom Fresh Off the Boat.

“What television series would you most like to be on?” I ask.

“Stranger Things,” he says. “It never gets old. I’ve watched it over and over again.”

Even though Stranger Things is obviously not a comedy, Corwin admits that, as an actor, comedy is his favorite genre. And some funny unscripted things have happened on set.

“What’s the funniest thing that’s ever happened during filming?” I ask.

“During a Firestone Tire commercial, my fake mom was in the car, and she was supposed to pop out of the sunroof with a cake and a piñata, but she spilled the cake all over the windshield and ruined the piñata.” Retake!

Fun on the set

Recently, Corwin finished filming his role as Ben Rogers in The Adventures of Thomasina Sawyer, the story of Tom Sawyer told from a female perspective. The movie was made by USC film grad students and is currently in post-production. 

When you get a bunch of kids together, interesting things occur, it seems.  “Anything weird ever happen during filming?” I ask.

“During a break in filming The Adventures of Thomasina, my friend Jaden was eating a donut, and we were called back on set, and he said his line while chewing the donut.” Another retake?

Jaden has turned out to be a friend Corwin sees outside of acting, though sometimes, as Diane says, “They might be up for the same part.”

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A ring on every finger, Corwin sports his many baseball rings

“Are you ever nervous or get stage fright?” I ask him.

“No,” he says. 

Diane adds, “He doesn’t when he pitches and plays baseball either.”

Without a doubt, “unflappable” is a good quality for both acting and baseball.

Although there are no actors in his family, there must be a sprinkling of performance and athletic genes in Corwin’s makeup. Dad Chris played volleyball on scholarship for USC and went on to play on the AVP (Association of Volleyball Professionals) and MPVA (Midwest Professional Volleyball Association) tours for over 10 years before settling into a management role within the corporate world. 

From fitness/figure competitions, Diane segued into a UFC sponsored infomercial and marketing program promoting a set of instructional workout DVDs featured in Shape magazine. A few years back, she also appeared on The Price is Right with Corwin’s older brother, Blake, 22, who is a guitarist with the band Joyous Wolf. 

It’s a big age difference, but brothers still fight, don’t they? 

“There’s not that much to fight about,” Corwin says.

Diane adds. “And they’re both very mature.”

Corwin recalls memories of playing chess, Banjo 1996, and video games on his first Xbox with his brother.

Now Corwin plays the interactive baseball video game “MLB The Show 18” with his baseball coach, Pac Gutierrez, which apparently is helping Corwin with his game. Not only is he a star pitcher, he plays third base as well.

Baseball treasures

Although Corwin’s room is filled with baseball memorabilia, there are two things (or rather 38 things) he’s especially proud of; his 10 baseball championship rings —awarded for being either tournament champions or finalists (second place) — and his 28 bats. “None of the bats are wood,” Corwin says. “You can’t use those until college.”

With all that’s going on, one wonders if there is anything typical about his life. Well, his fourth-grade class studied Missions (haven’t fourth graders been doing this forever), and his San Pedro Mission was made of colored beans. But, what’s not typical, is that to maintain his grades, when he’s filming, he works with a teacher for three hours a day between takes. His favorite subjects are math and history. 

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A roomful of baseball memorabilia

Along with school, either of his pursuits would keep any kid and his parents hopping. Yet the family appears to seamlessly interweave these two demanding activities. 

If there is a baseball tournament, “We book-out with the agent, so he won’t schedule any auditions for him,” Diane says. “Sometimes he does have to miss baseball practice because of auditions and call backs, but then on weekends, he puts in the work.”

The logistics of two demanding pursuits

Of course, none of this could be accomplished without the support of his parents. The logistics of keeping all these tops spinning requires a substantial amount of planning and driving. Traveling to auditions (which can involve multiple auditions with directors, producers, and writers for one part), and then back again for callbacks isn’t unusual. 

(And that’s not even factoring in the anxiety of waiting for callbacks and “an avail,” which is the step after a callback to determine the actor’s availability.)

Further, by the very nature of being on a Travel Baseball Team, there’s a lot of traveling involved with that too. Sometimes acting and baseball very nearly conflict, but the Allards seem to work that out. On one occasion, they had to leave a baseball tournament in Hacienda Heights to go for an acting call back, but returned for the next game, picking right up where they left off.

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Ready to swing

On March 31, Corwin and his parents were off to the USSSA (the national governing body for elite level players) All-American Showcase in Santee. It was the national tryouts for the Far West Region, in which 25 top elite players are chosen to compete in Florida during the summer. 

Diane reports, “The showcase for the USSSA All-American went very well, we think Corwin definitely has a good chance of making the team! We will not know for sure until June 21. We do know that Corwin had the highest corner infield velocity (60 mph) out of the entire Far West region (which included kids from the Mesa district, the Mira Loma district and the San Diego district) for his work at third base. He also had the second highest fastball pitch speed (58 mph) out of the district that he tried out in (San Diego).”

As competitive as Corwin is, it’s apparent there’s no competition between acting and baseball in his mind. He says, “I want to be a professional baseball player.” His favorite baseball player is José Altuve.

No limits in the future

Whatever he decides, the sky is the limit for Corwin, whether it be acting or baseball (or maybe there will be a third or fourth endeavor). Undaunted, this multi-talented kid extraordinaire can handle it all. And I wouldn’t be surprised if he one day appears on his favorite television series, since once Corwin sets his mind to something, it materializes. 

Stranger things have happened.


Thea Walsh: Water polo dreams

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by MARY HURLBUT

Laguna Beach High School senior Thea Walsh is, like many of her fellow seniors, filled with mixed emotions. There is reluctance to close the chapter on her high school years along with excitement and anticipation for what is to come next. For Walsh, her next chapter officially begins when she realizes her dream and starts as a freshman at Stanford in the fall. “I’m so excited. It was a dream of mine to go to Stanford,” she says. “I didn’t realize I could actually get there until about 11th grade,” she says, still seeming a bit surprised at her good fortune.

A goal of many, realized by very few

As one of the best water polo players in the country, Walsh will play for the Cardinals and be reunited with her fellow Breakers Aria Fischer and Bella Baldridge. Walsh says she has wanted to attend Stanford ever since she played her first Junior Olympics there when she was 12. In that, she is not alone.

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LBHS senior Thea Walsh will take her water polo skills to Stanford in the fall

In age group water polo, the Junior Olympics alternate every other year between southern California and northern California. When they are held in northern California some of the games are held at Stanford’s pool. This experience translates into almost every young polo player declaring at some point, “I want to go to Stanford.” Alas, with a less than five percent acceptance rate, the dream becomes reality for only a very few.

An academic interest in science

Walsh says she hopes to study bio-medical engineering or human biology at Stanford. Clearly, her abilities aren’t just limited to the pool. “I’m excited to get to Stanford because I know I will get the best education and the best treatment (as an athlete),” enthuses Walsh. And her excitement is well-deserved. Her road to get there, and the schedule she has endured to make it a reality, have not been easy.

Surviving the grind

“With water polo you’re always grinding,” she says good-naturedly. “For the high school we have morning practice three times a week so I get up around 5 a.m. Then there’s school from 7:30 to usually around 1:30. Then practice after school every day for two to three hours. Then you have you find time to eat, sleep and do homework.” 

Finding time wherever possible

During club water polo season, the times may be different but the hours put in are the same, even more when you factor in the driving to and from practice. “Those days it’s like a four-hour practice,” she says. “I realized that those were four hours I could have been doing homework,” she says. “So I tried to find the one or two classes where I could do my homework when I didn’t have to do anything,” she admits. 

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The LBHS pool is practically a home away from home for Thea Walsh

The Junior National Team is another commitment

Walsh’s water polo is not confined to just high school and club. She plays on the Junior National Team, as well. Luckily, LBHS girls coach Ethan Damato just so happens to be one of her national team coaches. “If he had to miss something, I had to miss something,” she says of her overlapping commitments to her many teams. “Last year we missed three weeks in December, but other than that I haven’t missed too much of high school (polo).” During those three weeks she competed in the FINA Youth World Championships in New Zealand where the team finished fifth.

Rising to the competition

It is clear Walsh relishes the competition of the national team. “I love the national team because it takes me to the next level. They elevate my play. Every person there is the best from their high school or club,” she says enthusiastically. Plus it has broadened her horizons with trips like the one to New Zealand as well as the chance to play against college teams like UCLA and UCSB. This summer she says her goal is to again make the national team and go to the Youth World Championships in Serbia.

A band of sisters on the LBHS team

That being said, Walsh is equally devoted to her high school team. “Socially, I love the girls on the high school team.” She has played with most of the seniors on her team since she began playing when she was 12 years old. 

Trying just about every other sport before finding water polo

Walsh says she came to polo after playing almost every other sport there was. She was at the pool as part of the swim team when Laguna Beach parent Scott Baldridge began his recruiting. Baldridge, a former collegiate water polo player, along with Erich Fischer, a former Olympic water polo player, can be credited for helping build Laguna Beach into a girls’ water polo powerhouse.

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The encouragement of her community and peers means a lot

A persuasive parent gets credit

“I was on swim team and Scott Baldridge kept pushing (me to try water polo),” she remembers with a laugh.  Back then, Baldridge and Fischer encouraged, cajoled and occasionally begged their daughters’ friends to give the sport, which they coached through the city, a try. 

Two persuasive parents help create a dynasty

The two dads proved to be good coaches and excellent recruiters as many of the girls they coached have gone on to play collegiate water polo, including their own daughters who all went on to play at Stanford. Makenzie and Aria Fischer took it one step further by not only playing in the Olympics, but winning gold medals.  

Finding her place in the goal

For Walsh, once she found polo, she found her sport. “I started out as a field player and I was really bad,” she recalls. “On our 12 and under team we took turns being the goalie. I was pretty good at it and I just stayed there,” recalls Walsh. “I hated swim. I begged not to go. When I started polo I actually wanted to go to practice. That’s why I made the decision to play polo.”

Blocking penalties becomes her “thing”

Saying there was “no question” she was going to play in high school, Walsh got her first taste of big time success when her 14 and under team won the Junior Olympics. “I got MVP of the tournament. We went into a shoot out and I blocked some shots. I realized I liked that. Goalies aren’t really expected to do that and so that kind of became my thing,” she remembers. She adds, “A bunch of other girls could have gotten MVP at that tournament.”

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Walsh hopes to hang another banner, of the Olympic Gold Medal kind, at the LBHS pool someday

Knowing the value of waiting – and learning

Walsh is quick to credit her teammates, both past and present. Her freshman and sophomore years she played behind LBHS goalie Holly Parker. Some girls with Walsh’s pedigree and talent might have complained or transferred to a school where they could get immediate varsity experience. Walsh saw the wait as a positive thing. “I was able to get a handle on things. Holly is really good and she pushed me to compete. She is a big role model for me.” Parker currently plays for USC. 

Looking on the bright side

This year the team didn’t have the season they expected. Admitting that the pressure to keep their undefeated streak alive and win every game “sometimes sucked,” Walsh still sees the her final high school season’s glass as half full. “We overcame obstacles and ended on a positive note,” she says. When asked what she will miss most about leaving LBHS she doesn’t hesitate. “The girls,” she answers emphatically. “They’re like a second family to me now.”

Not afraid to go for her dreams

With her high school days winding down, Walsh can look ahead to a summer filled with “a bunch of different trainings.” And while getting to Stanford checked the box for one of her dreams, there is another one, an even bigger one, out there waiting. “Making the Olympic team is one of my biggest goals right now,” she says. Currently, there are three banners hanging at the LBHS pool in honor of the three LBHS water polo players who became Olympians. Here’s hoping Walsh can make it four.


The Honorable Paul W. Egly 

Story by MARRIE STONE

“Honorable” was the word conferred on Paul W. Egly in 1963 by Governor Ronald Reagan when he was appointed to the Superior Court of Los Angeles. But being declared honorable by judicial appointment is one thing. Being an honorable man is quite another. It comes from within. The decisions Judge Egly has made throughout his life, both on the bench and off, are consistently one thing…honorable.

Born in 1921 in Covina, a small town then ripe with oranges and discrimination, Judge Egly remembered the days of segregated swimming pools – no Latinos or African Americans allowed. The town had an ordinance making it illegal for black people to stay over night. 

Growing up steeped in racial intolerance and well-versed in history (he obtained a bachelor’s degree in history from UCLA), Judge Egly had strong opinions about discrimination. Those opinions would become the subject of excruciating controversy later in his career. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

The sacrifices required of war

Judge Egly was drafted into WWII and sent to Germany during the war’s climax, though he rarely speaks of his time there. “A few days ago I asked Paul, ‘Don’t you want to tell me more about it?’” his wife of 34 years, and former Mayor of Laguna Beach, Jane Egly, tells me as we all sit together in their north Laguna home. “He was sitting in his chair. He bent way over, faced the floor, and said, No.” Jane pats her husband’s arm. “You can stick with that, dear.”

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Photo courtesy of Jane Egly

Paul Egly – a handsome young man in uniform

There was, however, one war story that stood out. Judge Egly was tasked with evacuating all the Americans from an East German hospital shortly after the war ended. A Russian general in charge of the operation ordered that no American would leave the hospital until everyone else had been evacuated. “He didn’t even raise his head when he said it,” Jane says. It took Paul nearly four weeks, working alone, to get everyone out. By the time he finished his job, Russians were outside, hanging people from the lampposts. He told Jane there was nothing to do but walk away.

Judge Egly listens to his wife tell this story before saying, “It’s more fun when we get back to California.”

But it took Judge Egly a while to return to California. First, there was law school at George Washington University (GW). Then he returned to Europe after the war, working in the US Occupation Courts in Germany, before opening a practice in Covina.  

A heart for justice, a mind for law

Judge Egly’s superior reputation on the Superior Court was no surprise. He took to the law instantly, knowing within two days of arriving at GW he’d landed on the right career. Jane says Judge Egly was known for his ability to distill massive amounts of material, absorb all the arguments made by opposing sides, and quickly hone in on the central issue. He applied his legal mind to a variety of cases, as he was willing and able to tackle anything that came through his door.

In a 2013 interview for La Verne Magazine, Judge Egly recounts a story from his early years practicing law. “In those days, people expected you to know what you were doing regardless of the kind of case. It was fun. There was a case that came in at four in the afternoon,” he said. “A woman wanted a will, and I had no gas for the car ride home. She asked me how much I would charge her, and I said $2. In that time, gas was 17 cents a gallon, so that $2 got me far.” Judge Egly even took criminal cases on a pro bono basis. “I didn’t make any money, but I enjoyed every minute of it.”

After a decade practicing law, Paul Egly was appointed by Governor Pat Brown to the Municipal Court in 1963 and, later that year, by Governor Ronald Reagan to the Superior Court of Los Angeles. He would serve on the bench until 1981.

The bus stopped here:

Crawford v. Los Angeles Unified School District

 Arguably the most seminal, and tragic, case of Judge Egly’s career came nearly a quarter of a century after Brown v. Board of Education. He was about to embark on a painful life lesson: doing the right thing would not always be rewarded. 

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Photo courtesy of UCLA/Photo by Joe Kennedy

Paul Egly seen through a school bus window

In the early 1970s, Egly successfully ordered the San Bernardino school district to align itself with the Brown decision and desegregate its schools. Several aspects of Judge Egly’s desegregation ruling in that case still stand: magnet schools, incentive pay for bilingual teachers, and year-round instruction were all part of that order. 

But a decade later, and 60 miles away, things wouldn’t go so smoothly. White Angelinos were loath to put their children on buses. As Patt Morrison wrote in an LA Times article in 1997 reflecting on the case: “It was an unlovely time in this lovely place, the shrieking suburbs vs. the shouting city, aggrieved white vs. angry black vs. out-of-the-loop Latino, armed school guards put on patrol the first day that thousands of kids stepped aboard buses, death threats and recall threats, the tragicomic effort to halt busing as a pollution risk.”

Judge Egly recounts the hundreds of threatening letters he received over the four years he worked on the case. He remembers a man who sat in the front row of his courtroom each day, wearing a sign saying, “Recall Egly.” His name, it was said, became the most popular four-letter word in Los Angeles. The turmoil claimed the health, and life, of his second wife. It took a dramatic toll on his psyche, if not his career. And the whole matter ended in a whimper, instead of a bang, as busing ceased when Proposition 1 passed, declaring his ruling unconstitutional. Segregation seeped back in. “Like some sort of embarrassing love affair: it ends—pfft—and nobody wants to talk about it,” Morrison’s LA Times article reported.

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Photo courtesy of Jane Egly

Paul Egly – Superior Court Judge

Egly came to think about the Crawford case as a kind of death, requiring post-mortems and autopsies, trying to diagnose precisely what happened. Doing what he felt was right, and being demonized for it, was difficult to accept. In its aftermath, he left the bench. “All that stuff about noble decisions. It’s BS. It’s the law of the land that changed me. Black is beautiful to me now. It’s that simple,” Egly said in a 1981 interview with the Claremont Courier

Egly sensed discomfort even among his colleagues who disagreed with him, as though their moral compasses may have covertly pointed in directions different from their stated opinions. “What does it mean, I’ve sacrificed my career? My career is in my head. Right?” 

That statement strikes me as the very definition of honor.

Making a case for service

Judge Egly’s career didn’t end with Crawford. He continued teaching, which was arguably his first passion. The U.S. Constitution, he said, had become his religion. Egly founded the University of La Verne College of Law in 1970 while still serving on the bench. He acted as its dean and taught constitutional law for 34 years. He loved nothing more than watching students’ eyes light up when they hit on some understanding. “It’s like a blossom blooming into a flower, seeing them begin to understand the cases,” he said in his La Verne Magazine interview. “You enjoy it with them; you learn with them and try to make it more interesting.”

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Photo courtesy of L. Gilbert Lopez

Judge Paul Egly with L. Gilbert Lopez

Egly also co-founded Judicial Dispute Resolution, Inc. in 1990, an independent, neutral panel of private judges hired to hear cases outside the court system. He took a wide variety of civil cases over the years. He also worked tirelessly in Laguna alongside James Dilley and others to preserve the city’s greenbelts.

Never losing sight of what’s important: 

The judge’s battle with macular degeneration

Judge Egly began his battle with macular degeneration just after retiring from the bench in the early 1980s. He lost his sight over the course of years, the world slipping away slowly over time. And, with it, his freedom. By the late 80s, he could neither read nor write, but he moved with Jane to Barcelona for a year, enjoying his final time with vision. “I know no one who adapted to that problem the way Paul did,” says Jane. “It was just remarkable.” Judge Egly sought out Braille and books on tape. “He still reads more than most of us,” says Jane. She shows me his tape recorder, saying he’s always got a book going.

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Photo courtesy of Jane Egly

Paul Egly at play

After 34 years together, their marriage still feels playful. “I think he married me because I could drive,” Jane laughs. Given that her husband has said she “was the luckiest thing that ever happened to me,” I’m guessing it’s more than Jane’s driving that kept them together. She remains in awe of his many accomplishments and proud of the legacy he’s leaving both on the bench and in Laguna’s greenbelts. 

Hard lessons learned from the bench

More than once during our interview, I reflected on the many battles Judge Egly fought over his storied career, and wondered aloud whether we’d made as much headway as I’d once hoped for. But Jane was quick to remind me of our country’s progress, particularly for women.

I returned home and sat with an article Judge Egly wrote nearly a decade ago, after being asked by the late Donald Dunn, dean of La Verne’s College of Law, to pen a post-mortem piece about the Crawford case. “The following pages will help with the understanding of the rocky marriage between politics and the court in public policy matters,” Egly wrote. What followed were 55 pages of long lament by an honorable man still – 26 years later – struggling to make sense of what had happened. 

He concluded the piece by saying, “It has taken me a while to understand that the best of legal principles can never become public policy unless embraced by a substantial segment of public opinion.”

I reflected on a few of the best legal principles our courts have upheld in the last decades – reproductive rights, marriage equality, immigration laws –often without the full support of public opinion. Honorable roads aren’t easy ones, but they’re unquestionably worth the fight. 

It’s unclear to me whether Judge Egly ultimately found solace in his decision. Maybe solace is less important than the legacy left behind. Progress, after all, is rarely a straight line, but more often a string of circuitous paths blazed by brave men like the Honorable Paul Egly.


Dr. Gregg DeNicola of Caduceus takes great care of patients, including many gallery owners and artists

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Dr. Gregg DeNicola looks at his overall medical career like a basketball game. For the first half of his career he practiced in Yorba Linda. After 19 years there, he says he wanted to change things up for his second half. As a kid growing up in Covina, for Gregg, Laguna was a regular destination. 

“The first year we came down was 1969; it was the first year we had cars. We stumbled onto the Sawdust Festival, it was much more hippie-ish back then, more our age people. We loved it,” remembers DeNicola. So when it came time to decide where to begin his second half, he found an office near Three Arch Bay and rented it month to month, until 2007 when he found the place where he practices now: Caduceus on Thalia. 

Finding Caduceus on Thalia

Caduceus is a family practice. Originally, Dr. DeNicola says he thought he was going to be a pediatrician, but when it came time to put that choice on paper during the “match” process (where med students select their field and top choices for residency) he balked, feeling it was too limiting. He was an obstetrician for his first 19 years in practice. Now, as a family practitioner, he gets to see the whole family.

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Dr. Gregg DeNicola at his medical practice, Caduceus on Thalia

“Why would you want to retire?”

“Back when we were in our mid-40’s my friends were always saying, ‘We’re going to retire by the time we’re 55.’ I never really got that. Why would you want to retire?” he asks. Even now he says people ask him almost daily when he’s going to leave the hustle and bustle of his medical practice behind. “I say, ‘Why? That’s silly! I’m a block from the beach. I have the best patients. Why would I want to retire?”

Fundamental changes in health care that are not for the better

That’s not to say that there aren’t some things about practicing medicine that he wouldn’t like to alter. In a change he calls “disturbing,” DeNicola laments the turn away from the idea that the patient comes first to that of the payer coming first. 

“Whether it’s a PPO, an HMO, or a concierge service, with every patient the first question is ‘How are you paying for this?’ When I started out, five, ten, even 20 years ago we didn’t worry so much about getting paid. Now, if you have a 15-minute office visit, half of that time is committed to satisfying the paperwork. It used to be all the time went into the patient.”

Another example DeNicola gives regarding these changes is that his office now has three full time certified “coders” who assist in ensuring the charting the insurance companies demand is done correctly. “This is just one example of how money that used to be spent on patient care is now going towards the business end of things.”

Finding Laguna to be a special place to practice medicine

And that’s just one more reason, perhaps the biggest reason, DeNicola loves to practice medicine in Laguna Beach. “My practice works out really well in Laguna Beach,” explains DeNicola. “We take (all forms of insurance and payment), even Medicaid. We see gallery owners and artists gratis and are grateful to be able to do that.” Yes, you read that correctly. Dr. DeNicola sees artists and gallery owners for free.

Part of the reason is because DeNicola is a huge art fan. “I love art. I can’t draw at all, but I love art. I always have,” he says enthusiastically. He got into the local art scene by going downtown and walking through the galleries, the fairs and festivals.

“Then it evolved into artists bringing their work in. All of it is for my patients. I love having them come in here so we can talk about art,” he says. Which is how he came up with the idea to treat artists and gallery owners for free.

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Paintings by local artists are prominently displayed at Caduceus

Giving back to artists and gallery owners with free medical care

“I realized by talking to the artists that if they had a cold they couldn’t afford to see a doctor. I thought it would be an easy thing to do to help them out. I have never bartered for art,” he adds definitively. “But, I am a business man as well as a doctor.

“And by doing right it has also paid off in other ways when the artists’ families and friends come in. We only ask that they be a local artist or gallery owner. I couldn’t afford to help every artist in Orange County,” he says. 

As for why gallery owners, he says they struggle, too. “They can go weeks and weeks without a sale. I’ve lost a lot of gallery owners who have had to move out of town. Of course, they’re in it to make money but they all love art. That’s a tough field,” he says appreciatively.

A resident of Orange, but a life made in Laguna

Appreciation is something DeNicola has a lot of for Laguna Beach. Although he lives in Orange, he says he spends more time here than many people who live here. “My life is here”, he says. He’s so entrenched, he is the president of the Laguna Beach Historical Society. He came to become involved in the organization when he stopped in to see the Murphy Bungalow, which serves as the Historical Society’s headquarters.  “They had a form and it asked ‘Are you willing to help us out?’” DeNicola remembers. He marked “yes” and they promptly called him and asked him to sit on the Board. That was 12 years ago. 

The more things change, the more they stay the same

DeNicola says that the thing that surprises him most about how Laguna has changed over the years is how much things have stayed the same. “I’m shocked by how much it hasn’t changed. Laguna is so united. It’s a very traditional community,” except, he adds with a laugh, “Not its politics.” 

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Dr. DeNicola’s examination room is quintessentially “Laguna”

A true appreciation of Laguna Beach and its history

By learning the town’s history, DeNicola says he has a deeper appreciation of what makes Laguna special. “It’s really a unique place. I don’t know another community like it…maybe back east?” 

That’s the reason why, if you come to see Dr. DeNicola, you will find his waiting room chairs set in a circle. “I did it that way so people could talk to each other. You can hear people strike up a conversation, ‘Are you going to the Patriots Day Parade this year?’ Things like that. It just doesn’t happen in most other cities.”

Of course, DeNicola acknowledges that even in this special place, things aren’t perfect. “Even though we have our trials, I know as a community people are trying to get things fixed,” he says. 

DeNicola says it bothers him to see the empty theater and Hotel Laguna, among others. “It’s very disconcerting,” he says. But not enough to diminish his appreciation for his (almost) hometown. 

“We have a gem here,” he says. “It’s such a special place, and has such a special feeling. It’s a wonderful place to work, live, shop.” Dr. DeNicola’s enthusiasm for Laguna is only matched by his enthusiasm for practicing medicine…in Laguna.


Lenny Vincent: Laguna’s Spiderman and much more

Story by DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Entomologist, tango enthusiast, professor, photographer, archivist; which word doesn’t fit? Sounds like a question on a test. But for Lenny Vincent, they all fit. These are just a few fascinating facets of his life, and to those who read Creature Features, he’s Spiderman, the expert source of endless information on insects. 

“Perhaps you may be interested in writing a story on the, unfortunately, maligned yet beneficial spiders of either Orange County or Laguna Beach,” Lenny wrote in an email last summer. And I was. Now, because of him, residents know about several local species of spiders, where to find them (if one so desires), their various webs, and their titillating and complicated courtships. 

A debunker of insect myths

Graciously, upon request, he continues to debunk the myths and mysteries of the insect world.

A resident of Laguna Beach for over 30 years, he knows his spiders and he knows Laguna, especially the wilderness areas. Lenny has been teaching entomology and biology for 36 years; at University of California, Berkeley from 1974-81 (part time), Georgia Southern University from 1981-86, and at Fullerton College from 1986-2015. He is now a Professor Emeritus at Fullerton College, and teaches part time, although not this term.

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Lenny with Silas and Charlie

With a stunning view of Catalina and San Clemente Islands, Lenny has lived in his South Laguna home for 21 years. Curiously, it’s absent of the expected framed insect collections. Instead, it houses two other species; two dogs, a Beagle named Charlie and a Shar-pei mix (Lenny thinks), the handsome Silas, and two desert tortoises currently in hibernation under the house, Ompahpah and Bristowe, gifts from a student in 1993. 

“Tortoises live to be 100 to 150 years old,” Lenny says, “so I’ve had to find someone to take them over.”

No gallery of insects to be seen

Out of sight, but not out of mind (mine anyway), his spiders are confined to another room that serves as the lab. And in place of those anticipated assemblages on his walls, is a display of his beautiful photographs of insects and plant life. 

Surprisingly, one area is filled with black and white pictures (not taken by him) of tango dancers from a tango tour he went on. But that will come later in the story.

Lenny’s stepson, Matthew Haim, a student at San Diego State, walks through the living room on his way to school for exams. No, he’s not studying entomology, but something of the spider world must have rubbed off on him, because he did write an article on the brown widow spider that was published. Matt’s a business major (and writer) and has a local connection. He works at the Front Desk at Hotel La Casa de Camino.

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Collection of spiders in Lenny’s lab

As we wait for the dogs to howl at a passing fire engine, which Lenny says is quite a spectacular show, but sadly doesn’t materialize, the question of how and when Lenny decided to devote his life to insects and make it a career, comes up. “While I was in high school in Cleveland, Ohio, I would collect and curate insects and sell them to other students for biology. I did that for a couple of years.

Interest in spiders peaks at graduate school

“Then I majored in biology at California State University at Northridge and took courses in entomology and liked it. When I went to grad school at University of California, Davis, I was interested in Medical Entomology, but when people would ask about spiders, I was drawn to that, so I switched to arachnology,” he says.

He then went on to get his Ph.D. in Entomology at UC Berkeley.

And his enchantment with insects never waned. Just last summer, he and a former student made quite a find. He frequently hikes in Laguna Wilderness Park to search out and photograph spiders, and during one of these treks, they found an undescribed species of jumping spider. 

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In-house lab

“It will take a specialist in jumping spiders to describe a new species, and that could be a long process,” says Lenny.

A longtime wilderness supporter, he’s been on the Board of Directors of Laguna Greenbelt since 1995. He is also the President of the Board of Directors of the Schlinger Foundation, and has been on the board since 1998. A non-profit founded by a former Entomology Professor at UC Berkeley, the Schlinger Foundation just recently provided a grant to aid construction of the new Laguna Canyon Foundation headquarters. 

Hopes children will reconnect with nature

Lenny says, “By bringing children into the wilderness, I hope they’ll gain a connection with nature that’s been lost.”

If all that isn’t enough to keep him busy, for the last 10 years, he’s served as archivist for the American Arachnology Society, which entails, as he explains, “Archiving letters from retiring arachnologists for the Smithsonian Institute.”

During Lenny’s unrelenting study of spiders, he has compiled a remarkable and extensive OC Spider website, and it’s in the process of becoming a pictorial guide through a grant (for printing costs) from the Schlinger Foundation. Although it won’t be finished for a year, the guides could be a resource in places like Nix Center.

One imagines an entomologist to be sequestered in his lab all hours of the day and night cataloging insects and who knows what else (and I don’t mean the activities of the scientist in The Fly). Yet seldom does one picture “a man of the insects” out tangoing. But Lenny’s not your average entomologist (if there is such a thing). 

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Does that smile mean Lenny is dreaming of the next night out tangoing?

When he turned 50, he started taking West Coast Swing lessons, which led to ballroom, and then the tango. Every few days, he goes to Avant Garde Ball Room or Atomic Ballroom to dance. About 10 years ago, he went to Buenos Aires on a tour of tango clubs, which he says, “Aren’t too flamboyant.” Although in the pictures on his wall, the women do have roses in their mouths.

As if all this weren’t enough, Lenny finds the time to lecture a few times a year at The Audubon Society, the Environmental and Nature Center, and other organizations on subjects such as the biology of spiders or insects.

It’s endlessly intriguing why someone devotes an entire life to the study of one thing. When asked what other profession he might have wanted to take up, without hesitation, Lenny says, “If I had the skill, a cellist, but I have zero musical talent. I know, I took voice lessons for two years.”

Well, it might have been impressive to add that to his list of accomplishments, but right now, the “unfortunately maligned” spiders of Laguna, and the supporters of the Laguna Wilderness are glad he didn’t become a cellist.

For all you ever wanted to know about spiders, go to Lenny’s spider guide website, ocspiderguide.com.


Captain Jeff Calvert: Happy to serve Laguna Beach

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Many young boys say they want to become police officers when they grow up. Laguna Beach Police Captain Jeff Calvert is one of the few who actually followed through with his boyhood dream. “I still have a report from when I was in fourth or fifth grade when I interviewed a police officer,” explains Captain Calvert. That first interview may have planted the seed, but a career day encounter with a law enforcement officer during his senior year at Laguna Hills High School, grew the seed into an emphatic career decision. “After that I knew what I wanted to do,” he says.

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Captain Jeff Calvert, a 22-year veteran on the Laguna Beach Police Department

When an enthusiastic Calvert went home that day to share his career of choice with his father, his father wasn’t nearly as excited. “He said, ‘You’re not doing that,’ remembers Calvert. His father was a businessman and he assumed his son would follow suit. But fate intervened.

A well-timed ride along

“When I was 20 my friend got a job with the Sheriff. He asked me if I wanted to go on a ride-along. Well, he got called on a Code Three and we got to drive with the sirens on, on the opposite side of the road…when it was all over I knew it was exactly what I wanted to do,” remembers Calvert. He broke the news to his dad and enrolled in the Police Academy. His dad eventually came around. “When I graduated, I had never seen my dad so proud,” he says.

An “eye-opener” for a first job

Calvert’s first job was with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. He worked in Norwalk. “That was an eye opener for a kid from south Orange County,” he says. Eventually, he came to the Orange County Sheriff’s Department and worked at the Intake Release Center (IRC) for three years. The IRC is a maximum-security custody facility. “I learned all there is to learn about running a custody facility,” he says. And then fate intervened again.

Making his way to Laguna

“My heart was always in Laguna,” he explains. He even applied for a job with the LBPD right out of the Academy, even though there weren’t any openings. Finally, in 1996 he had his chance – a position became available at the LBPD. Taking that job has led to a 22-year career in a myriad of positions from patrol officer to undercover narcotics to sergeant to lieutenant and now captain. And Captain Calvert couldn’t be more pleased. 

An unusual partnership with the community

“I’ve always had a strong desire to help people,” he says. Helping them in Laguna is particularly rewarding. “Generally, the relationship between the police and the community ebbs and flows,” he explains. “I haven’t seen that here. The community here has always supported the police department.” And that support isn’t something Calvert, or the department, takes for granted, as witnessed by the department’s commitment to community outreach, in addition to trying to provide the best service possible.

Innovation is encouraged

Calvert leads the Investigations and Support Services Divisions. Field Services, led by Captain Jason Kravetz, and Civilian Services, led by Jim Beres, are the other divisions within the department. Under Captain Calvert’s leadership a Homeland Security Maritime Team, an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) program, K-9 program, a Know-Your-Limits program and many other innovative programs have been implemented. Listening to Captain Calvert explain each of these programs, it is clear how much he relishes his job. “Everyday I’m energized to come to work,” he says earnestly.

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Captain Calvert in the Dispatch Room at the Laguna Beach Police Department

An appreciation for learning – and Trojan football

Captain Calvert is also motivated to expanding his skill set. He received his Masters in Executive Leadership from USC Price School of Public Policy. “I drank the Kool-Aid,” he says with a laugh about his passion for USC – and its football team. Calvert is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy. “That was an unbelievable experience,” he says enthusiastically. “I was never one to really love school, but as I’ve gotten older I’ve come to really love learning and being part of something that is bigger than myself.”

A small town with a relatively sizable police force

Now, I, probably like many Laguna Beach residents, wrongly assumed the LBPD was a small organization (small town = small police department). Captain Calvert helped disabuse me of that idea. Despite a residential population of 24,000 people, Laguna’s police force of 52 sworn officers is considered relatively robust. The average force nationwide is made up of 10 sworn officers or less. 

A “well-rounded” crew

The reason for Laguna’s sizable force is the six million annual visitors we host. However, despite its size, Captain Calvert insists that the force is “well-rounded.” He uses the dispatch center as an example, “They do police, fire and marine safety,” he says. “They are a very talented crew down there…their skills are unique.”

New ways to keep unsafe drivers off the road

Additionally, the 133 drinking establishments within the city’s nine-mile limits can keep the officers busy on any given night. “Laguna Beach has more DUI arrests per capita than any other agency in the state of California,” explains Calvert. So programs like Know-Your-Limits, where officers enter bars and gently and unobtrusively ask people if they want to test their blood alcohol level, are a proactive way to help prevent a tragedy (or at least a DUI). “Thirty three percent of people who think they’re not at a DUI (level) are,” says Calvert. The participants in the “test” are given a $20 Uber credit to help make sure they get home safely.

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Captain Calvert in the driver’s seat with Chief Farinella in the Patriot’s Day Parade

Facebook as a crime fighter

Another thing Captain Calvert oversees is the department’s social media team. Its purpose is two-fold. Most obviously, it serves to humanize the department. “We use humor and the community has really responded,” says Calvert. “The Instagram account is more ‘life behind the badge,’” he explains. Their Facebook page communicates about crimes and things going on in the community. “We have solved three to four crimes with our Facebook page,” says Calvert with a chuckle. “It’s a terrific investigative tool for us.”

A deep appreciation for the community he serves

He again credits the community for stepping in and making a difference, as well as the people he works with. “It’s a team effort. It’s the amazing people I work with who care about their profession and the community. As for the community he serves? “I’ve had an amazing career here,” he says. “I have friends all over the country who just don’t have the community support that we do (in Laguna).”


Glori Fickling: The woman behind (and inside) the 

1950s private detective series Honey West 

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

This year, Gloria (Glori) Fickling again turns the age she’s always turned…29. Now, she says, you only have to hold that number up to the mirror. 

If ever a woman could convince you age is only a number, it’s Glori. She still exudes the same sense of fun adventure and daring flair for fashion she had 70 years ago when she met her late husband, Skip, while crawling backwards out of a hotel window wearing nothing more than a bikini. (Stay tuned for more on that story later.)

Best known for their collaboration on the first female private detective series, Honey West, that debuted in the 1950s, Glori and Skip celebrated a storied career.

We sit for a few hours – outside the home she and Skip built together in 1953, overlooking Laguna’s village with the church bells ringing below and the sun setting across the Pacific – and hold up that magical mirror on all the “29” glorious years of Glori’s life. 

Fashion first, fashion always

Fashion and a sense of style may be woven into Glori’s DNA. Born in Brooklyn and raised in Queens, fashion had been on her brain since she could remember. “Ever since I was a little kid, in my head I would be designing clothes,” Glori says. Before meeting Skip, Glori’s early career revolved around apparel. She worked for Women’s Wear Daily, the bible of the industry at that time. 

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The always-glamorous Glori in her library

Glori also became a fashion consultant for May Company, choosing all the clothing for their photo shoots. “In fact, I designed the first line of maternity clothes,” she says. Glori’s boss at the time grew jealous of her early and swift success, giving her only a small line in the magazine for her progressive designs.

Fashion became a theme of Glori’s life, influencing not only the concept and character of Honey West, but defining Glori’s sense of presence in everyday life. She’s known for her big-brimmed hats and trendy outfits, vogue jewelry and enviable shoes. Glori will never be caught looking anything less than the best dressed.

Except that one time…

Seventy years ago, still single and on a Catalina Island adventure with friends, Glori got locked inside her hotel room. With no other means of escape, and wearing only a rainbow-striped bikini, she took matters into her own hands. The window was low to the ground, but navigating it in a bathing suit made an entertaining scene. 

Skip Fickling sat on a railing outside her room, watching her progress. “Well, aren’t you cute,” Glori said once she made it to the ground. Skip asked her out on the spot, but Glori already had a date. 

Fortunately for Skip, Glori’s date turned into a disaster. Like a scene straight out of their later Honey West novels, Glori had to physically fight the man off. “The guy tried to nail me on the table,” Glori recalls. “I took my two feet, threw him across the room, and ran like hell back to the inn.” 

Skip was there waiting.

They spent a sweet weekend together. And, on Sunday, Skip accompanied Glori to church. He held her hand throughout the service. In a later 1959 appearance on the show “You Bet Your Life,” calling up this story, Groucho Marx asked Glori, “Why was that? Didn’t he trust you when the collection plate came around?”

The two eventually eloped to Las Vegas, getting married at one of those little chapels on the Strip. “The lady who stood up for us…she was only wearing a bathrobe, for crying out loud,” says Glori. “I asked her name. Skip thought that was so funny I wanted to know her name. But it was very sentimental to me. For god’s sake, I was getting married.”

A peach of a pair

Glori and Skip may have modeled their marriage after Glori’s parents. Glori talks about her father, Frank Gautraud, with some of the same reverence she has for Skip. “He was God’s gift to mankind,” Glori says about her father. “He had such a sense of humor. Mom and Dad were always laughing.” 

Her own marriage felt full of that same fun love. Skip and Glori loved travel, they loved Las Vegas, they loved working together. “A peach of a pair.” That’s what she called them.

“When you have parents who love each other all the time, you know you’ve got a chosen life,” says Glori. And Glori’s life has felt chosen.

How Honey was born

Twenty-first century women know the strength of being both smart and sensual. But in the 1950s, women who survived on bravery and wits, with more than a little sex appeal on the side, were a new breed. Skip and Glori were the perfect couple to usher that woman into the mainstream.

Honey West was based on Glori’s vivacious personality, Marilyn Monroe’s classic looks, and a Mike Hammer style hardboiled detective. A blue-eyed blonde bombshell with curves that wouldn’t quit, not to mention wit and wiles, Honey West was the first female private eye in American crime fiction. Named after the common and relatable pet name “Honey,” and “West” because, well, she lived in southern California. Out to avenge her father’s death, Honey was known to be “the sexiest private eye ever to pull a trigger.”

Writing under the gender-ambiguous penname G.G. Fickling (a nod to Glori’s maiden name Gloria Gautraud), the couple wrote 11 novels. Titles like “A Kiss for a Killer,” “Girl on the Prowl” and “Honey in the Flesh” all were born before the feminist movement took off across the country. 

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Honey West: “the sexiest private eye ever to pull the trigger”

This led to the eventual launch of a 1960s television show directed by Aaron Spelling and starring Anne Francis, who sported a tight black jumpsuit and sleek sunglasses, and kept company with a pet ocelot named Bruce. While the program only lasted one season, it became the precursor to later shows like Charlie’s Angels, Cagney & Lacey and Police Woman. 

Glori’s office is a shrine to Honey. Bookcases are crammed with copies in several foreign languages. Posters, dolls, memorabilia, and a long line of hotel room keys collected from their book tours line the shelves and walls.

“Her bravado, her great spirit, that’s what Skip saw in making me the role model,” Glori said in an interview last year with the Orange County Register

Glori’s great spirit

I ask Glori about her great spirit, and what she believes sets her apart. “I’ve always been so outgoing,” she says. “If I ever see anyone sitting alone, I always ask them to join me.” 

But, she tells me, there was one time she did not, and this led to one of her greatest life regrets. Once, Glori and Skip were having lunch and happened to see Marilyn Monroe sitting alone. “Almost any other time, I would have invited her to join us, but I was so humbled. She was gorgeous, like a glass doll.” Monroe felt untouchable and intimidating. It seemed too much of a stretch to ask.

Glori feels if she would have reached out to Monroe, told her that Honey West was based on her image, it might have made her day. As she recounts the story, it’s as though Glori feels the weight of responsibility in not alleviating some of Marilyn Monroe’s pain. “If I’d done that,” she says. “It would have been so cheering. What a foolish thing. Every other time, I would always ask.”

Not everything is easy

Glori forever looks on the bright side. But life doesn’t always offer its brightest sides, no matter how lucky you are. And in the mirror of her 29 years, there were some rough times.

At 14, Glori contracted a virulent case of rheumatic fever, forcing her to leave her home in New York, move away from her parents, and live with family in California. “The doctor said I had to get to some warm climate. I had relatives who lived here, and my mother sent me out.” 

It was a childhood illness that took her away from friends and family, but it led her west, to the great state where she’d meet her husband and make Laguna Beach her final happy home.

The hardships didn’t end there. Glori and Skip lost their first child shortly after his birth. The hospital made a mistake, sending Glori home when they shouldn’t have, resulting in complications they couldn’t control. This sunk her into a deep depression, one she wasn’t certain she’d crawl out from. But, she says, this heartbreak prevented Skip from having to fight in the Korean War. He knew Glori might not make it without him home. The couple went on to have three sons, three grandsons, and now a great-granddaughter. 

Years later, they would have lost their home in the 1993 Laguna fire, but for Skip’s training in World War II. He knew the roads, how to drive at night with the lights off, how to crawl through the brush and sneak back to the house when it was surrounded by police presence. That decision saved their home. Skip saw a hot-spot building next door and was able to contact the fire department in time to squelch it. Another lucky break, Glori tells me.

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Glori displays some foreign editions of the Honey West series

But Glori’s greatest loss was Skip, who passed in 1998. Skip had prostate cancer that he opted not to treat and, ultimately, it spread to his brain. “Meeting Skip was the great blessing,” she says. 

This is Glori’s way – turning every misfortune on its head to see the happy sides. Even as she tells me she doesn’t know why she’s lived this long, feeling like she should “give others their turn,” she recognizes she still has more life to live, and more to give the world.

Laguna’s latest grand marshal

At five o’clock, when the bells ring again and I think I should go home, Glori goes in the house to fetch us white wine, and we talk some more. Because with a life lived like Glori’s, there’s a lot to say. 

Glori is Laguna’s latest grand marshal. She’ll march at the head of the annual Patriot’s Day parade. This seems like an ideal choice. Forever the fashionista, the eternal life of the party, still dressed to kill, it’s little wonder Glori is Laguna’s darling. “This is my biggest honor,” she tells me. 

The road ahead

Always ahead of her time, Glori keeps facing forward, looking toward the future – to the possibility of bringing Honey West to the big screen and excited about her role as grand marshal. She’s still writing, anxious to contribute her talents wherever she can, still attending Thursday art walks and local events.

Like Honey, Glori is unstoppable. She’s a force of beauty and brains, style and ability. Her nails are perfectly painted, her makeup impeccably applied, her words carefully chosen. Nothing about Glori is left to chance. 

But what strikes me most is Glori’s warm acceptance, her willingness to say “yes” to life, to take in the stranger at the next table, and to turn every tragedy into an optimistic opportunity. Maybe that’s the secret to eternally turning “29.”


Patrick Fetzer: A childhood paper route takes an unexpected turn and lands him at Laguna Cyclery

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Patrick Fetzer, owner of Laguna Cyclery, speaks eloquently about the feelings he had as a kid in Texas when he got his first bike, and the freedom it granted. But it was a love of music or, more specifically, a desire to become a member of the Columbia Records Club that really first launched his passion for riding. 

“The only way I could get the money to join (the Records Club) was to earn it so I got a paper route. I threw papers seven days a week using my mom’s ten speed bike,” he recalls.

Necessity breeds a lifelong love

Because the papers were heavy and balancing was tricky, Fetzer says he “crashed a lot.” So he found himself at the local bike shop – a lot. Hanging around there waiting for his bike to be fixed he says he became fascinated by the posters of the Tour de France riders on the shop’s walls. “I was a BMX kid. I thought people who rode ten speeds were dorky. But I was struck by the intensity of the Tour riders (in the posters).”

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Patrick Fetzer, owner of Laguna Cyclery, and his trademark dreadlocks

A paper route leads to a love of racing

Eventually, Fetzer says, he’d deliver his papers and then continue on with his trusty ten-speed going on longer and longer rides. “I was 12-13 years old. My friends are sitting around doing nothing. I’m out riding 30 miles and I’m really feeling my independence,” remembers Fetzer. His dad took notice, bringing home a flyer for a bike race. Fetzer says he entered it and finished fourth. 

“All these guys had these really fancy bikes. I was so intimidated, there with my cheap bike. But I was bitten by the bug.” And the bug has yet to release its jaws.

A trip to California leads to a surprising conclusion

Fetzer came out to California in 1996 to attend a bike convention. “I had just graduated from college, the University of Texas. I was working in a bike shop, but I had a college degree and didn’t want to keep turning wrenches,” he says. His boss encouraged Fetzer to go with him to Anaheim to attend the convention. With resume in hand, Fetzer made the trip west. 

A romance leads to Laguna

While the convention was the reason Fetzer came to California, it was a romance that got him to stay. During his stay, Fetzer met a woman who would eventually become his wife. She settled in Laguna, which is how he came to settle in Laguna, on Agate. “We left Texas in a record-breaking snow storm,” he recalls. “I thought that was a good sign.”

Still hanging out at the bike shop

Fetzer did a lot of odd jobs in the beginning of his life in California, but he was still involved in riding. This involvement introduced him to the bike shop on Thalia, housed in a big red barn, next to The Stand. The owners of the shop were a husband and wife team who had previously owned and successfully sold two other bike shops. “It surprised me there was no bike scene in Laguna,” says Fetzer. “The owners, they struggled with it. Laguna is a peculiar community.” The owners mentioned their intention to sell the business. Fetzer didn’t have the money to buy it and things went along as before.

Some prodding, a loan and no more cubicles

Then, a year later, his wife was inspired. She wanted him to own that bike shop. “She calls me and says, ‘You can do it!’ At the time, I was working for a civil engineer, in a cubicle, hating it…so I set out to get an SBA loan which wasn’t very easy.” One of the requirements was that Fetzer had to take an eight-week business course. “I learned more in those eight weeks than I did in four years of college,” he says with a laugh. May 1, 1999 the business was his. 

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Patrick Fetzer with his kids, Luke and Lauren; Luke rides and both are fixtures in the shop

This bike shop has some serious history behind it

With almost 20 years in business under his belt in the big red barn, it would be understandable if Patrick just concerned himself with his own tenure there. However, he is quite a historian of the space his shop inhabits. 

Laguna Cyclery has operated as a bike shop since 1971. Originally built as a meat and produce market in the 40’s, it then operated as the place where Have’ A Corn Chips were made, then a restaurant, finally a bike shop by way of a Peugeot bike distributorship. 

Fetzer says he’s the fifth owner of a bike shop in the space. “I’ve lasted the longest, obviously.” He remarks with a smile: “Although after two years I wasn’t sure I was going to survive.” Clearly, his fears were unfounded.

Replacing one team with another

As the shop became more established, Fetzer did his best to create the bike scene he thought the town deserved. In 2004 Fetzer sponsored a road racing team. “It was at the highest level of USA-based racing,” he says proudly. “That was a great period in my life. It was so much fun.” That lasted three years and then the team was sold off. He has since followed that with his involvement in the Thurston and Laguna Beach High School mountain bike riding teams, officially called Laguna Beach Interscholastic Team.

Working to keep high school kids on the team

The team is overwhelmingly made up of middle schoolers, his seventh grade son being one of them, although it’s a sixth to twelfth grade squad. “There are thousands of kids at these races,” says Fetzer. “It can be a bit intimidating at first, but once everyone gets sorted out it’s good.” 

The team competes in the National Interscholastic Cycling Association. “It’s great. There’s a place for everyone,” he says enthusiastically. “It’s for the kid who isn’t a baseball kid or a surfer kid, but we also have kids who do it all.” Fetzer says they’d like to recruit (or keep) more high school kids on the team. “There are more and more scholarships for riding. Schools like UC Davis, UCI, Berkeley, Boulder all offer riding scholarships,” according to Fetzer.

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Fetzer behind the counter at Laguna Cyclery still “turning wrenches”

A shift to the mountains

The enthusiasm that the team was met with speaks to the devoted mountain biking fan base in Laguna. With the abundance of trails surrounding us it’s certainly not a surprise. As a result, Fetzer says he has geared (no pun intended) his shop towards mountain bikes. “We are focused on mountain biking,” he says. “We’re all scared of cars and traffic. I’ve seen a huge shift to the mountains for riding.”

And while Fetzer certainly rides in the hills, he hasn’t abandoned the road. He is riding in a 100-mile road race that starts at the George Washington Bridge in New York. “I’ve never been to New York. For 100 miles there will be no cars, no traffic.  I’m really looking forward to it.” And after almost 20 years it’s likely the shop will survive without him for a few days, although when I met him there it was pretty much non-stop customers from the time he opened his doors to when I left.

Learning to adapt to whatever comes next

“It has never been easy,” says Fetzer of his business. “First it was catalogs, now it’s the internet. But I think it’s a love affair with this corner that keeps this shop open,” he says. “The town continues to support this business which is a testament to its love of biking and an active lifestyle.” 

A younger Fetzer, the one just out of college who didn’t want to “turn wrenches” anymore, might be surprised to find his older self still doing just that. However, it undoubtedly makes all the difference when the wrenches are your own.


Al Treviño: The visionary landscape architect attributes much of his success to “lucky breaks, and the people you meet”

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Sitting in the Bluebird Canyon home he designed and built almost 60 years ago –the home he nearly lost in the 2005 landslide – Alberto (Al) Treviño, 86, is eager to tell me about the new nonprofit website, www.seniors2seniors.com, that he is hoping to launch. 

The website will connect high school seniors with the elderly. “The goal is to help senior citizens while fulfilling community service hours for high schools,” he explains. The young are tasked with teaching technology to the old, giving them lessons on their smart phones, tablets and other devices. “I want to reach the administrators from each California school district, and get them familiar with the website,” says Al. 

A big project for a man who claims he’s retired. 

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Al has a great smile

No question in my mind that this new project will succeed. Al’s vision and accomplishments are legendary in Orange County. As a landscape architect, Al pushed the boundaries of conventional design. As a Hispanic, he pushed Orange County’s boundaries of discrimination. His professional legacy can be seen throughout Orange County and his influence extends well beyond. His personal legacy will last for generations. From 60 years of marriage to his beloved wife, Dolores, came 11 children, 22 grandchildren, and a collection of memories that seemingly have no end.

Out of Al’s imagination sprung the designs for Fashion Island and Linda Isle in Newport, and University Park and Turtle Rock in Irvine. His hand guided the path of the 405 freeway. His vision inspired Epcot Center in Florida. He served under three U.S. presidents as Assistant Secretary of HUD.

Humble, Al claims things were different with his generation. He felt less spoiled, more serious, and in tune with the generations before. He says luck played a role, and the people he met along the way made all the difference.

People like Frank Gehry, George Argyros, Howard Bolzt and even Joseph Kleitsch, though the latter’s influence occurred via a painting rather than a serendipitous meeting.

More about those serendipitous meetings later. But first, I ask Al to fill me in on the 

winding road of his life. 

Born into both distinction and the Great Depression

Al was born in Inglewood in 1931, at the height of the Great Depression. When business dried up in California, his father (who owned a chain of shoe stores) moved their family to El Paso, Texas. 

Al’s mother, Adelina, was from the Escajeda family. The Escajedas had a long history of power and influence in El Paso, and were the earliest pioneers of the town. King Ferdinand VII of Spain gave the Escajedas a land grant in 1818 and they settled San Elizario and Ysleta. Adelina’s name is still encrusted in the stained glass of the Ysleta mission.

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Al in front of a favorite painting

In contrast, his father’s family settled in Mexico in 1480. “The Treviños were known as Jews in Spain,” Al tells me. “The king, during the Spanish Inquisition, made a decision to throw out the Jews. They gave my family a choice: stay and be killed, or set sail for the New World.” Today, the Treviños still have a stronghold in Monterrey, Mexico, remaining a rich and powerful family.

Although the family returned to southern California during Al’s high school years, these earliest influences were, perhaps, instrumental to Al’s own destiny. Al was one of Orange County’s initial and significant settlers. He came to Laguna Beach in the 1960s, before any of the modern-day industries or businesses were built. His was the first house built in his Bluebird Canyon neighborhood. But Al arrived with vision – and degrees from both UC Berkeley and Harvard in landscape architecture. The Depression gave Al drive, and his history gave him confidence. 

The circuitous path to success

When Al began his academic career, he’d never heard of ‘landscape architecture.’ But he did like plants and trees. So, after graduating from Saint Francis in La Cañada Flintridge, Al set off to Cal Poly Pomona to study horticulture. During a design class, a professor saw his drawings and the head of the department pulled him aside. “You should become a landscape architect,” Howard Boltz told him. “You could get into Berkeley.” This single comment changed the course of Al’s life.

But Berkley nearly rejected his already approved application because of one stark ‘C’ on his transcript – in Spanish. “There was discrimination against Hispanics then, and I didn’t give a damn about the class. My mother spoke perfect Spanish. My sisters, to this day, speak Spanish. But I didn’t care about it.” Leland Vaughan, the head of the department and a prominent California architect, looked at Al. “Aren’t you Spanish?” he said, while signing Al’s admissions slip.

The interruption of war

Being a student wasn’t enough to spare Al from war. In the middle of his academic career at Berkeley, he was drafted into the Korean War. But because he tested well, he was sent to medical school in Fort Benning, Georgia. “I was attached to a tank battalion,” says Al. “We’d go out on maneuvers and people were always getting hurt. It was something I never expected to do.”

One night, while on maneuvers near the Alabama border, the lead tank ran over a civilian’s vehicle. “The fellow was pinned in the car. He was moaning, but there was no blood,” says Al. The man’s injuries were entirely internal. His stomach and chest had been crushed. “There was nothing we could do ourselves, so we called an ambulance.” When the ambulance arrived and took out their stretcher, they saw the man. “’You’ll have to call a black ambulance,’” they told Al. “’We only treat white patients.’” It took over an hour for the black ambulance to arrive. Too long, as it turned out. “That kind of thing was prevalent,” says Al. “And it really hit me.”

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Al contemplates his past

But the war brought Al nice surprises, too. One day, a starred general showed up asking about Al. He’d heard about Al’s talents in landscape architecture and decided it was time to improve the base. Al was transferred to special services. He was given a staff, a Jeep, and – eventually – a mission to improve all the officers’ facilities across several states throughout the southeast. 

“I walked into the Corps of Engineers looking for help. I yelled out, ‘Are there any architects here?’” Al recalls. “This little guy in the back raised his hand. He said his name was Frank.” Frank’s last name turned out to be Gehry. 

Al helped Frank Gehry get a transfer to Special Services, before leaving the army himself and attending Harvard. 

The house where dreams were made

Al returned to California after Harvard. But Pasadena, where his parents resettled, held no pull for him. Dolores suffered asthma, and the ocean proved better for her health. When Al discovered Laguna Beach – the tiny town that, at the time, held few professional opportunities – his father nearly lost his mind. He’d offered to help Al and Dolores buy their first home, but insisted that home had to be in Pasadena or San Marino. 

The owner knew Al’s reputation and talent. He agreed to give the property to Al for whatever he could afford. “I was only making $6.50 an hour.” Frank, his new friend and fellow architect, was jealous. He was only making $4.50.

Al remains in that same house today. In many ways, the house itself is a metaphor for Al’s life. Beautiful but impossible, perched precariously on the side of the hill. Its 1960s style is quirky, but enduring. The design is bold and ambitious, and the views are beautiful. 

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A wonderful view from Al’s house

When he brought his bride to the property nearly 60 years ago, he said, “Pretty nice view isn’t it, Dolores.” Al gets choked up recalling it. Dolores has been gone for over two years, but her absence still feels palpable to Al. “I haven’t really been happy since,” he says.

How Joseph Kleitsch rescued Al Treviño

The 2005 Bluebird Canyon landslide hit the Treviños hard. Their house was red/black-tagged. They had 30 minutes to remove a few personal items. Al’s son grabbed his mother’s favorite painting. To Dolores, it had only sentimental value, depicting the San Juan mission she loved. Al picked it up at a garage sale for twenty bucks some years before.

When the Treviños discovered insurance didn’t cover landslides, they feared they would lose the home. That’s when their neighbor discovered that the salvaged garage sale painting was, instead, “Evening Shadow,” an original oil from famed plein air painter Joseph Kleitsch (1885-1931). When the painting sold for $500,000 in a private auction, the Treviños were able to rebuild their home.

A dining table, cardboard and Polaroids –

The birth of Fashion Island

Around Orange County circles, Al is famous for his progressive vision that shaped Fashion Island. The original concept was a conventionally designed indoor mall. But Al didn’t like it. “There’s no need to have an enclosed mall by the ocean,” he told the developers. 

Basing his design on the Old Orchard mall in Skokie, Illinois, Al spread some cardboard cutouts across a dining room table to show investors his vision. The mall would be open-air, incorporating European-style piazzas and lush landscaping. The design would take advantage of the nearby Pacific and the Mediterranean climate. There would be sky bridges across to the surrounding office buildings with outdoor coffee shops and flower stands. 

When Al proposed high-rise office buildings in a county that had little more than dirt roads and orange groves, he said, “People thought I was smoking something.” But it all came to pass, just as Al envisioned it – minus the sky bridges, which Donald Bren decided would block visual access to storefront signage.

A county still mired in discrimination

This was the 1960s. Talent, intelligence and experience still weren’t enough to spare a man from the sting of discrimination. When Fashion Island was close to completion, the Irvine Company decided it didn’t want a Hispanic face on the front of its project. A white planner would be hired over Al to give all the presentations pertaining to the project. 

Al was well aware of the prejudice that existed against Jews and Hispanics in Orange County. The California Club, a country club in Los Angeles infamous for its discriminatory practices, had several prominent Orange County members. He knew it was time to take his leave. 

Life beyond the Orange County curtain

Although Al never left Laguna Beach, he took a lucrative offer from General Electric (GE) and continued his storied career, taking on large projects mostly on the east coast. Over the coming decades, he would work for GE and Walt Disney, then as Assistant Secretary at the Department of Housing and Urban Development under Presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and George W. Bush and, later, as Assistant Secretary of Policy Development and Research.

Shortly after September 11, the White House flew Al to Madrid in an effort to build good relations with Spain. As Al prepared to deliver a speech on urban planning, he discovered George Argyros, famed Orange County real estate investor and U.S. Ambassador to Spain, was in town. The two spent their time together, traveling to Toledo Spain and to Eli Broad’s opening at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.

“My life has just been events like that,” says Al. 

Still conquering new horizons

I ask the question: Are men like this born or made? 

Al would say it’s all about lucky breaks. He credits meeting a long series of smart, engaged and talented people for many of the good fortunes he’s experienced. “Argyros, many of these people, we were all very poor young men. We’ve just been very nice to each other.”

As I pull away from Al’s home, watching him take his two caged birds inside for the night and turn off the living room lights, I can relate. I, too, feel lucky. These people we meet along the way – they make all the difference.


Lexi McKeown: the scholar/athlete with deserved honors and a bright and sunny future

By MAGGI HENRIKSON

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Laguna Beach High School senior, Lexi McKeown may only be a teenager, but her accomplishments are a lifetime’s worth. She’s a kind-hearted superstar volleyball player as well as a stellar student – and she’s just getting started.

Lexi McKeown

Lexi is a fourth generation Lagunan. Her grandpa is widely remembered in this town as McKeown Plumbing. Her mom, Kathy, laughs as she tells me that when people hear the name, they invariably ask oh, that McKeown? “I say, ‘It depends on whether you had a good plumbing experience.’” Lexi’s grandpa is known as Poppy, and she adores his sense of humor. “He was born on April Fool’s Day,” she says with a smile.

Lexi and her mom are very close, particularly as it was just the two of them – Lexi has not seen her father since she was three years old. Kathy and Lexi share the genetics of good humor, dedication to education (mom is a school principal in Irvine), and a passion for volleyball. Kathy played back when she was at LBHS, and went on to play at University of Notre Dame. Lexi’s volleyball future is looking very bright as she heads off to Florida State in the fall.

How do you pick a college?

She might have had her pick of colleges, with an academic record including Advance Placement (AP) awards and a 4.5 GPA. And then there’s her volleyball achievements, including being a four-year varsity starter, earning league MVP twice, and All CIF First Team awards. But Lexi’s choice of Florida State was a multi-faceted decision.

“I talked to six schools. I thought of UCLA, Cal, Stanford, but my coach suggested visiting Florida State,” she said. “I wanted something different from Laguna. I loved Florida as a state. I had this ‘aha moment’ walking on the campus. I love trees and brick buildings – that old-timey feeling.” 

She visited three more times and got to really appreciate the volleyball team and the coach. Florida’s Division One team is ranked number four in the nation. It all added up to the perfect fit for Lexi.

Dedication and commitment

The busy life as scholar/athlete started somewhere around age 11. Lexi was playing club soccer, but relented to mom’s suggestion that she try volleyball. “I originally rebelled against doing the same thing as my mom. I tried it more to appease her,” she said. “Then I found out I’m actually kind of good at it.” 

She was hooked.

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The journey commenced with age-group club play after school and on weekends. “You have to love it,” she says. “It’s a huge commitment. You give up a lot.” 

Kathy agrees, “That’s why she never skied till last week!” Her “Ski Weeks” were tournament times. Alas, Lexi found out last week that skiing is “not my thing!”

The athlete

These days the busy life includes strength training at the Rock in Newport Beach, beach volleyball at Main Beach or Doheny, with weekends and all summers dedicated to tournaments up and down the coast. Beach volleyball (vs indoor) is Lexi’s favorite, and she’s achieved a triple-A women’s ranking.

“I’ve always been kind of tall, so [with indoor] you don’t get to serve, just hit,” she says. “Whereas, in beach volleyball you get to do it all.” 

She pairs up with several different partners. “It’s fun because you get to learn everyone’s different aspects. 

“People come for summer tournaments from all over,” she continued. “Florida, Texas, California… The sport is really growing across the nation.”

Her favorite tournament is at Hermosa Beach. “There’s a lot of space and I really like it. It’s where the Junior Olympics and the Nationals are held.” 

Among her tournament awards are two first-place winnings in College Showcase Tournaments, and a third place medal in the National Volleyball League Women’s Pro Open Tournament.

The scholar 

A big part of what makes Lexi such a success is her level of commitment. She demonstrates that in volleyball and in the classroom. Her favorite subjects in school are also the ones that give most folks anxiety attacks – science and math.

“My favorite is AP Calculus with Miss Quigley,” she says with a smile. 

She was named AP Chemistry Scientist of the Month in Mr. Sogo’s class, and has also won awards in US History, World History, and the Orange Coast League’s Academic Achievement Award for three years. An impressive resume, to be sure, but Lexi handles it all with calm sensibility and humility. And she gives back of her time and talents, with the LBHS Athletic Leadership Team.

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Selected as a founding member of the Athletic Leadership Team in 2016, Lexi has helped younger kids as a positive role model. The program is designed to promote good sportsmanship, school spirit, respectful behavior, and personal accountability. 

“I mentor and help,” she says, simply.

Her warmth and kindness make her a perfect role model, and will no doubt serve her well in the future as she is planning to go into emergency medicine. She’d like to learn more by working with an ER doctor.

“I really like helping people,” she says. “You see a little bit of everything. I like the excitement!”

And when she has spare time, she enjoys the ER action on TV. “I love Grey’s Anatomy!” she beams.

With a bright future ahead of her, Lexi McKeown is ready for that leap from one coast to the next. We look forward to hearing about that journey as she trades the LBHS maroon for the garnet and gold as a Florida State Seminole.


Paula Arnold: Fiercely committed to the B&GC

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

As with so many parents who are faced with the proverbial “empty nest,” Paula Arnold found herself, in her words, “looking for a purpose” when her youngest daughter went away to college 11 years ago. She considered volunteering for CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates), an organization that promotes court-appointed advocates for abused or neglected children. However, after thinking long and hard, Arnold decided against it. She was still a little raw from her daughter leaving and felt “it was too soon” to take on such an emotionally demanding role.

It all started with a friend

Fortunately for all concerned, a friend, Milt Naylor, suggested Arnold look into the Boys and Girls Club of Laguna Beach (the Club). “Milt took me to meet (longtime Club supporter) Donnie Crevier and I signed on,” she recalls. Naylor knew what he was doing when he recruited Arnold. Since then she has repeatedly chaired the Club’s Gala and the Girls Night Out events, in addition to serving as the Club’s first female president. 

Making an impact from the start

Arnold made her presence in the organization known right away. “Within in six months of joining the Board I was chairing committees,” she says. It’s not hard to imagine. Arnold exudes energy and charisma. “It was fun. I was single then, and I would come in with dating stories. I’d have a committee of 12 women, and we always had something going on.” 

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Paula Arnold, the first female president of The Boys and Girls Club of Laguna Beach, among many other roles at the Club.

Not one to shy away from a challenge, after some time chairing committees, Arnold says knew what she wanted to do next. “I said, ‘I’m the next president’. I’m very alpha,” she adds with a laugh.

Spending money to make money

By then she had definitely earned the respect of her fellow Board members. “I took the Gala, which had previously raised $200,000-300,000 and at least doubled that. I told them we had to spend money to make money. It was scary for them,” says Arnold. 

If the Board was nervous, Arnold was not. Relying on her former skills as a Director of Marketing for a hotel/casino in Las Vegas, Arnold was not unfamiliar with how to put on a gala. “I wasn’t an event planner in Vegas, but I certainly did a lot of event planning,” she explains.

Everyone is a fundraiser, whether they like it or not

Besides elevating the Club’s gala, Arnold says another change she fostered as president was the idea that the Board’s members needed to raise money. “I told everybody, whether you like it or not, you’re a fundraiser. I was one of them. When I first joined I said I didn’t want to ask people for money. But once they realized they were already doing it, by talking to people they knew, about what they and the Club were doing, they realized it was pretty easy.”

70 cents of every dollar comes from the community

And fundraising is a critical part of the Boys and Girls Club. “We fundraise for 70 cents of every dollar. People find that shocking. We get very little in grants, although we do get some from the school district and some from arts programs. But the rest comes from the community,” she explains.

Embracing county-wide responsibilities, as well

More recently, Arnold has taken on a role with the Orange County Area Council for the Boys and Girls Club. Not surprisingly, she is president of that group. “I have 15 clubs,” she says. “It’s all volunteer. It’s more of a bylaws type of position, but it has evolved into an idea exchange meeting. We want idea sharing (among the Clubs). Take the Tustin Club, they just had their first Girls Night Out event after seeing ours.” 

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Paula Arnold with Michelle Ray-Fortezzo, Development Director of the Boys and Girls Club of Laguna Beach, talk Art of Giving Gala

Spreading the success of Laguna’s Girls Night Out

There have been nine Girls Night Out events in Laguna, all at the fabulous home of Laguna Beach residents Holly and David Wilson. At the event, women get together, eat, drink and socialize while shopping at booths set up throughout the property. All proceeds benefit the Club. It’s an event that could (and should) definitely be replicated by other Clubs. Arnold’s enthusiasm and encouragement undoubtedly motivated the Tustin Club’s Board to give it a try.

Still committed chairing the Club’s events

 With her new county-wide responsibilities it would be reasonable to assume Arnold has backed off her commitments to the Laguna Club – reasonable, but not accurate. Arnold is still chairing the Gala (May 12 at Montage, Laguna Beach) and Girls Night Out. “I like standing up there and saying, ‘How about…?’ I’m clearly passionate about it. I see the lives we enhance, even change. We have so many kids at who are at risk.”

Working for a teen center

With so much accomplished, Arnold is still committed to doing more. “I would love to see our endowment get to $5 million. We need a fully functioning teen center. It has to be open and free,” she says. The challenges of creating a teen center that teens will want to hang out in is not lost on her, but neither is the reality that providing teens with safe, supervised a place they can go can greatly reduce reckless behavior. 

Celebrating a first grandchild on the way

The only thing that might hamper her mission is the upcoming arrival of her first grandchild. Arnold is taking a month to be in Hong Kong with her daughter as they await the big day. Beyond that, there is always the Boys and Girls Club of America, the national umbrella organization for the Boys and Girls Clubs. Arnold, while not actively seeking out a position with the group, says she is also not opposed to accepting such a position. Time will tell.

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Paula Arnold and Michelle Ray-Fortezzo outside the Club where they spend so much time working to advance the organization’s mission

Giving and getting back

In the meantime, she has more than enough going on with her current Club responsibilities. And while she has given so much, as with all giving, she has received much in return. Coming to Laguna from Las Vegas in 2003 as a divorced mother of two, it took awhile for Laguna to feel like home.  Getting involved with the Club helped that. Arnold says it provided her with her first “heart friend” way back when. The friend, Karen Jaffe, remains a dear friend to this day. “Now I go to the grocery store and I know half the people there. Las Vegas will always have my heart, but Laguna is home now,” she says.

The Club is always open to new volunteers

And if anyone out there is looking for a “purpose” or just wants to get involved with a really wonderful organization, Arnold says there is room at the Boys and Girls Club. “If anyone is interested in understanding what being a Board member is about we are always looking for our replacements. Until you get into one of these meetings and see these really smart, dynamic people, you can’t understand how inspiring it is.” After meeting Paula Arnold, I have a pretty good idea.


Mark Chamberlain: Photographer, gallery owner,

artivist, arteologist - one of Laguna’s great treasures

Story by MARRIE STONE

In 1969, after his discharge from the war, Mark Chamberlain drove west. He packed his 1963 MG Midget with cameras and optimism. Dubuque, Iowa faded in the rearview mirror. Mark drove away from a childhood battle with polio and a year spent in Korea during the Vietnam War that had profoundly changed the trajectory of his life. Ahead was Laguna Beach, the town that would become not only his lifelong home, but the inspiration for a career in environmental activism and a literal canvas for his photography.

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Photo by Mary Hurlbut

Mark Chamberlain, 2018

 “Meaningful art,” Mark says, “always has an autobiographical connection.” I spend the next hours with Mark, along with his partner and art journalist Liz Goldner, unspooling those long threads of connections. We travel through his childhood and the war, from his 1970s retrospective on his hometown, Dubuque Passages, to his current book, The Laguna Canyon Project: Refining Artivism, due out this year.

Mark calls himself an “arteologist” and an “artivist.” He uses his camera to excavate truth and to document humanity’s devastating impact on the environment. In one notable project, he photographed “Future Fossils” – those modern-day objects in our contemporary culture he imagines will soon be extinct: gas stations, automobiles, glitzy steel buildings and billboards, the gaudy super-color sprawl of urban landscapes. 

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Photo by Mark Chamberlain

Photographer: Last Boxcar to Dubuque, from Mark’s Passages series

But I’m interested in a different kind of study with Mark. And so, together, we embark on a conversational dig of our own, excavating the roots of Mark’s past and chronicling all the artistic fruits that emerged. 

How a childhood disease led to an enduring desire

Mark contracted polio when he was in the fifth grade. His mother, not one to accept common fate, employed unconventional (and controversial) methods to help her son. The therapy was arduous and painful, but it worked. Mark credits his mother’s strength and dedication for his full recovery, and for his feminist attitudes today. 

Still, Mark was bedridden for a year. During that time he read... and read... and read. He discovered Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn and, specifically, riverboats. From this came a lifelong passion to own a riverboat and traverse the Mississippi River.

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Photo courtesy BC Space

Adventurer: Mississippi River Queen, 1959

Mark emerged from his recovery stronger than his peers. He learned to swim in the mighty Mississippi that, of course, flowed right through Dubuque. His father had little choice but to buy Mark what he calls his first “magic carpet,” a 15 1/2-foot flatboat.  

To date, Mark has made his way down one-third of the Mississippi. He owns a 1959 shallow draft steel-hulled 25-foot houseboat with an outboard motor that can carry him through 12 inches of silted water. “Most people can’t even find the places I go,” Mark says. “It takes knowledge, which I have. And maps, which I also have.” Many hidden areas have been sealed off because railroads destroyed river traffic, Mark tells me. The currents silted them in, making the river impossible to navigate. But Mark has winches and tools – and determination.

Mark uses his boat as a shooting platform, giving him access to very tight and isolated river communities. “People tell me their stories. I have videos and photographs.” He anticipates this will make an incredible project. 

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Photo by Mark Chamberlain

Photographer: Mrs. Pillard, 1973, from Dubuque Passages

His desire to finish the final two-thirds is palpable. “Would you say you have any regrets in life?” his partner, Liz, asks. “Not finishing the Mississippi,” he says. “That would be my one.”

The unexpected blessings of Vietnam

Two days after Mark received his master’s degree in Operations Research from the University of Iowa, he was drafted. Though, through a series of lucky breaks, he was deployed to Korea instead of Vietnam. There he taught himself the language, as well as Korean culture and history, which ingratiated him to the locals. 

“I watched these 17 and 18-year old kids come in. They drank, gambled and whored.” Because the United States used Korea as a way station back to civilian life, many men were broken from time spent in Vietnam. “You could watch their lives change dramatically.” Mark was 24, on the older side of the draft, and a little wiser about life. He used that year as an opportunity, discovering photography and finding a Korean mentor to hone his craft. He had access to a Jeep and little need for sleep. In his free time, Mark documented his experiences, touring the country, talking to locals, and giving himself an education far more valuable than the one he received at home.

By the time he returned to Dubuque, Mark found himself deeply changed. His father had passed while he was away. “I didn’t have a home there anymore,” Mark says. “I didn’t agree with anything I was seeing.” Mark’s degree felt like a vestigial remnant of a life he no longer recognized. And so, camera in hand, Mark set out west to reinvent himself.

A partnership becomes a brotherhood

A few years after Mark arrived in Laguna, he met Jerry Burchfield. The two became instant friends. “Encountering Jerry under the circumstances I did was a meaningful passage,” Mark says. Jerry was an only child, Mark an only son. The two forged a kind of brotherhood they each were missing. Mark says Jerry is one of the only friends to whom he gave his early photographs from Korea. Although they were quite different, they shared a passion for photography, an interest in activism, and both felt changed by the war.

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Photo by Damon Nicholson

Jerry & Mark at the Nix Interpretive Center. On the left, an image from The Tell mural, leading into the trail. As part of their 25th anniversary celebration, the Nix Center will host a book signing of Laguna Canyon Project: Refining Artivism.

Together they co-founded The Laguna Canyon Project, The Legacy Project and BC Space Gallery, perhaps one of the longest continually running fine art photography galleries in the United States.

Although Jerry passed in 2009, there almost seems a soulful residue imprinted on Mark. He sometimes speaks of Jerry as if he’s still alive, at one point saying, “Jerry has a photograph from those days.” It makes me think, as I listen to Mark talk about Jerry, that’s how brotherhood should be – each absorbing the best of the other, and allowing them to live on.

Saving Laguna Canyon, one photo at a time

Longtime Laguna locals know Mark’s work well, even if they don’t realize it. Mark and Jerry were instrumental in saving Laguna Canyon from development by the Irvine Company. The Laguna Canyon Project spanned 30 years, and included one of Mark’s most ambitious projects to date: The Tell. 

Stretching 636 feet and rising 34 feet into the canyon sky, The Tell was a massive installation of photographs gathered from hundreds of community members in 1989. “No photograph was censored,” Mark smiles. “Though some had to be placed up high.” 

Its shape was meant to mirror the surrounding landscape, although it had a definitive head (representing Easter Island, and the inhabitants destruction of their own civilization) and a tail that trailed to the ground. The mural in many ways represented both the land and the creatures that roamed it. More important, it called people into the canyon. First, to search for their own photos. Then to commune with nature. And, finally, to take an active role in saving it.

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Photo courtesy BC Space

Artivist: The Tell overview, 1989

As the sun scorched the project and the hostile environment invaded, something new appeared. Where once the focus was on individual pictures and people, Mark and Jerry designed the mural so images of animals would emerge when the photographs faded – a dinosaur, a giant deer, people feuding inside the belly of a beast. 

“That’s part of the deceit of the piece,” says Mark. “If art isn’t entertaining to the artist, why do it?” They drew on the power of myths, archeological principles, and the history of Easter Island to play with the art and make a broader statement about the environment. “At the dedication ceremony, we had horsemen from Leisure World walk out from the throat. Men delivered speeches on scrolls of parchment. We tapped into every myth we could.” 

Mark calls his work a tricky seduction, his art operating on every part of the viewer’s conscious and unconscious mind. That’s the power of both myth and scale.

The Tell was dismantled in 1990. The skin came off first, Mark tells me. Then the skeleton came down. “Then the cross members were removed, so it became like Tellhenge for another two weeks.” Much of its remains were destroyed in the 1993 fire. Mark confesses it felt like a relief, the project almost a burden to keep alive. It died in much the way it was born – mythologically.

When asked if he would do it again, Mark says he’s guided by the principle that a project done once is art, and a project repeated is product.

The Great Picture – living life on a large canvas

Inspired by the success of the Laguna Canyon Project, Mark and Jerry turned their attention to the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, and to documenting the 4,700 acres of contiguous space in Irvine that would become Orange County’s Great Park. From that, The Great Picture arose. 

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Photo courtesy BC Space

Historian: The Great Picture

Three stories tall and 11 stories wide, the Great Picture is the world’s largest photograph made as a single seam image. By converting a jet maintenance hanger into a camera obscura, they achieved the exposure by creating a 6-millimeter pinhole lens projected onto a muslin canvas. Following a 35-minute exposure, the crew captured a black-and-white image that they processed in a pool-sized developing tray. The gelatin silver print portrays the control tower structures, tarmac and the distant San Joaquin Hills.

Breaking the Guinness World Record, and shown around the world, the image remains both a wonder and a masterpiece.

BC Space – the mouse that roared

As our time wraps up, we discover we haven’t discussed the gallery. BC Space, nestled beside the Candy Baron and above Violet’s Boutique on Forest Avenue, is hard to spot even if you know it’s there. There’s no advertising, barely a sign of any kind. 

Sometime after buying the gallery, Mark discovered the space used to be owned by the Masons. “The interesting thing about the Masons,” says Mark, “you had to ask to join. They didn’t invite you. You had to want to know more.” That’s the guiding philosophy behind BC Space. “I prefer to talk to people who know where they’re going,” he says. “You don’t walk in here by accident. If you make it up the stairs, you want to be here.”

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Photo by Mary Hurlbut

BC Space: “If you make it up the stairs, you want to be here”

Like everything in Mark’s life, he continues to have big ambitions for the space. “There are so many things I want to do here,” he says. “Every show has been curated from here, generated from here. Usually in response to some current event, or long-term recurring situation.” 

Self-invention or self-discovery?

“I don’t think we invent anything,” Mark says as we conclude our time. “Instead I think we discover things.” 

I consider this long after I leave. 

Then there are the words of his partner, Liz, who seems so moved by Mark that it’s her reaction to him, as much as the man himself, that leaves a lasting impression. 

“Over our years together, I keep asking him, ‘What makes you, you?’ ‘How did you get to be this person?’” 

Mark smiles and shrugs as Liz asks again. 

“With all these insights, and passions, and emotional and intellectual understandings. How did that happen?” Liz keeps looking at him, as though waiting for an answer. “To have the confidence to do the crazy things you did. To have the confidence to save the canyon.” 

Mark sits silent. 

“I guess it’s just his DNA”

“I guess it’s just his DNA,” she finally concludes. 

So maybe it’s true of people too: we don’t invent ourselves, but rather discover ourselves. We’re there all along, living fossils waiting to be excavated. 

Perhaps that’s why art feels so gratifying and so personal. By creating something, we’re really discovering something about ourselves. We’re shining a light on those profound parts of our soul, digging them up and bringing ourselves to the surface, letting others see inside. 

Looking at the long arc of Mark’s work – across distance and time, and almost always larger than life – that’s just how it feels. Profound.


John and Tyler Stanaland: A father and son flying high in the real estate industry 

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

John Stanaland knows Laguna Beach. Not only is he one of Laguna Beach’s top residential real estate agents, he was born and raised here. His family’s tenure stretches back to his grandparents who arrived in Laguna from Long Beach back when land was plentiful. 

“They were developers who moved into the trailer park that is now Montage [Resort],” explains Stanaland. “They developed Portafina, subdivided it and sold those for an oceanfront house in Victoria.” 

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John and Tyler Stanaland

Stanaland’s son, Tyler, is now working with his father fulltime, takes in the family history. “They lived at the trailer park?” he asks with surprise as Stanaland nods. From the grandparents on down, four generations of Stanalands have been involved in real estate. 

Leaving sports behind for a “real job”

Stanaland says that “After dabbling in a sports background I went into real estate at 27. I decided to give it a shot and see if I liked it.” Selling his first home almost immediately for $500,000 undoubtedly helped him decide it was a career he wanted to pursue. The “sports background” Stanaland decided to leave behind was as a professional beach volleyball player (and a third degree black belt). “I wanted to be a sports star until I realized I needed to get a real job,” he says smiling.

Like father, like son

Tyler is following in his father’s footsteps. A former professional surfer, Tyler says, “Real estate was always going to happen after surfing. I was always around the office when I was younger, doing stuff like bringing him cups of water,” he remembers with a laugh. “I got my license at 19.” 

Now at 28, Tyler says he’s ready to give real estate his full attention. “I had a lot of fun surfing, but this is not a bad work place,” he says as we look out the window of the spectacular oceanfront home he and his dad are charged with selling. “I have some big shoes to fill, but he’s a good teacher.”

A “go for it” attitude

Stanaland has been selling homes for 22 years. During that time he says he has been ranked first or second every year for the last 17 years. “I am very disciplined,” he says. I think it’s from my sports background. Like Tyler, anything we approach we’re going to go for it.”

Breaking records in Newport Beach

This “go for it” attitude runs deep. There is a thirst for adrenaline that seems to be hereditary. Selling the most expensive home ever in Newport Beach, 1 Pelican Hill Road North, as Stanaland did for nearly $40 million in November, would certainly get the heart racing, especially when it took only four days. However, the Stanalands seem to require even more stimulation. 

Skydiving and big wave surfing take care of the adrenaline fix

“I’ve jumped out of a few hundred planes,” admits Stanaland. He says he’s “just shy” of 300 jumps. “I got into it with my younger son (who is a Santa Ana police officer). He talked me into it and now I’m a class C jumper.” There is only one class higher. 

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John Stanaland

Even Tyler, who admits he prefers getting his adrenaline rush in the ocean riding big waves, has jumped out of four planes. It’s clear, however, that Tyler is not as sold on the activity as his father and younger brother, likening the experience to “falling.”

Stanaland takes issue with that description, insisting it’s more like “flying.” Father and son then launch into a good-natured debate on the matter. Whatever it’s like, it’s not for the faint of heart.

Success born from hard work

How much this love of adrenaline-inducing activities contributes to Stanaland’s success is debatable. What is not is his work ethic and commitment to his clients. According to Stanaland, “Residential real estate is emotional, it’s not just a business transaction. I try to figure out what my clients’ needs are. You can’t do it every time, but I have a pretty good success rate.”

Learning from the master of hard work

“He’s the hardest worker I’ve ever seen,” adds Tyler. “If you text him at midnight he responds in the same time frame if you text him at one in the afternoon. This is something I want to emulate.” When I raise the question as to whether or not he discourages midnight texts from clients, he dismisses the idea. “I always have a sense of urgency. My clients know if they reach out to me and don’t hear back from me I’ve been kidnapped,” he says with a laugh. 

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Tyler Stanaland

On those rare occasions when he can’t take the call, like maybe he’s jumping out of a plane (or fishing or surfing, two other activities he will make time for) Stanaland says there is always someone who will. “And as soon as I touch ground I will respond,” he says assuredly.

Loving Laguna Beach makes it easy to sell

Work ethic aside, it always helps if you like what you do, and both Stanalands genuinely seem to love their work. “I love the business,” he explains. “I like people. I like the houses I get to sell. I sell everywhere, but I love where we live.” Tyler echoes the sentiment. “I’ve been fortunate enough to travel everywhere a surfer would want to go, beautiful places. But Laguna is always home. This stretch of coast is something I’ve always wanted to come home to.” 

As we look out at the majestic stretch of Victoria Beach with unimpeded views both north and south from this stunning home, it is very easy to understand why.


Roxanna Ward: A life of music and song. And laughter.

By MAGGI HENRIKSON

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Roxanna Ward is the consummate performer. She manages to do it all – sing, tell jokes, teach, compose, arrange and conduct – and she even takes it on the road.

This past summer, she brought her own brand of irreverent, hilarious, often raunchy, self-parody-set-to-music to the cabaret stage in such far away places as Provincetown, Boston, and Rhode Island. We are lucky enough here in Laguna to catch her live act this month, at the No Square Theatre, from Jan 26 – 28.

Actually, Roxanna’s shows are coveted as private and corporate gigs all over the world.

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Roxanna Ward

She started out from her hometown in California, “I wanted to get to the east coast. I didn’t appreciate the Central Valley at the time,” she says.

Roxanna landed in Chicago, working for Williams/Gerard, a business and event production company. They sent her out to venues, writing music and conducting shows. 

“That was the first 15 years of my career.”

She worked with Tennessee Ernie Ford, and the group Brothers & Sisters. She did event shows for Shaklee Corporation. Then, a women specialty travel company was started, and for one of their cruises, Roxanna was asked to perform aboard on the trip tailored for 1,200 women. It was life changing, as Roxanna made close friends with the other performers from all over the world. 

“Musicians, performers, artists I didn’t know were working there too,” she remembers. “Now, 26 years later, I’m doing gigs all around the world, two to three times a year.”

Two of the friends she made on that ship, Lisa Koch and Vickie Shaw, will be performing with her at the No Square Theatre gig, a continuance of her “tour de force” show. 

During the summer and on holidays, her traveling show is featured on riverboat cruises all over Europe, on safaris in Africa, even in Antarctica, “Everything I could imagine!” she says with a smile.

A place to call home

Roxanna had been the full-time traveling entertainer for long enough, when a producer friend introduced her to Laguna Beach. She was residing in Manhattan Beach at the time, and she thought, what am I doing up there?

“I was doing studio work in LA, but this felt like the small town I love. One thing led to another.”

She made Laguna her home, and The Little Shrimp her home away from home.

A friend asked her to brunch at The Little Shrimp, and then said, “Get up on the piano and play something.” The owners followed up with a phone call asking her to start working there. 

“I didn’t have enough material, so I could stall with jokes, making parodies,” she says. “Three weeks turned into 13 years.” 

So, every Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the comedy came out to stretch the musical material, like self-preservation. “So much comedy comes out of fear!” Roxanna explains. 

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Roxanna says her students know her by her car

Roxanna and Bree Burgess Rosen, another Laguna musical icon, became friends at The Little Shrimp. It was a mutual admiration society. “I died when I saw her show,” Roxanna says of Bree’s Lagunatics. “I’m just amazed at what she’s done.”

The two continue to come up with ideas for shows together. Planning some No Square events, the two were talking. “She was picking my brain,” says Roxanna, “and she said, ‘Why don’t you do a show?’

“I made her promise – as it got closer, I’m going to try to pull out (there’s too much going on) – don’t let me!”

The show centers around the interesting and crazy life and times of Roxanna Ward. “It’s stream of consciousness. I just tell a story of how I got here, as a kid, what led me to this, what led to that… I have funny bits, and fly by the seat of the pants. I read the audience.” 

So, get in the audience and give her your feedback – but it’s not a show for the kiddos. Roxanna calls it R-rated.

Sharing her gifts with the next generation

As delightful as her shows are, this Laguna Beach tour de force is a dedicated teacher as well. She is the much-loved choral director and vocal coach at Thurston Middle and Laguna Beach High School. “Teaching is like doing five comedy shows,” she laughs.

The aspect of music plus teaching comes from a family legacy. Roxanna’s mom worked for the local school district in Modesto, and her dad was a professional musician, playing country music every night. 

“At age four, I begged for lessons. At age five, my mom said okay,” she says.

 As her music prowess progressed, the performer in her awakened. When neighbors started saying hi to Roxanna by name, her mother wondered how she knew so many people. Little did mom know, her daughter was doing private concerts. “I’d go around the neighborhood and ask people if they had a piano – and I’d play!”

In college at University of the Pacific, vocal coach William Dehning turned her on to vocals. Now, she’s put it all together. 

“I love musical theater,” she says. “It kind of combines it all.”

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Bree Burgess Rosen was the one who contacted Roxanna back 16 years ago, when there was an opening at the high school for a choral director. At the time, Roxanna’s son, Jake, was four years old and it was a good time to settle in and stay put for a bit. Since then, Roxanna’s made her mark on countless exceptional school plays, including “Nunsense” (in which she also performed as Mother Superior), “Gypsy”, and “Annie”. Her busy schedule includes rehearsals just started for “All Shook Up” coming up next.

When there’s free time

Roxanna likes the idea of driving around the country, sometime in the future, with her dog – that is, if she ever has free time. “I could probably ask people if they have a piano, and get a meal out of it. And something for the dog!”

Music has a deep-rooted significance in the life of Roxanna Ward, and she truly believes it brings out the best in the world. It can be a great unifier. “What would happen if everyone came out, at the same time, and sang the same note – like the common A?” 

She is thinking about the way a common point can bring humanity together, an especially important thing in these discordant times. Music and the arts have healing and teaching potential. 

“The arts bring people together,” she says. “We come together collectively and we can all have different feelings about it. It helps us access emotions. It transforms us.

“And, God, we need comedy! We need to laugh, especially now.”

We do. Laughter is the best medicine, and can be found right here at home thanks to Roxanna Ward sharing her gifts.


Jason Watson: Now part-owner, he sees Laguna Surf and Sport as a “second home” for local surfers

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Certain businesses become part of the fabric of the community they service. It helps if they’ve been around for a while, but it takes more than longevity to achieve this kind of status. These businesses are somehow able to reflect at least some portion of their community’s culture. 

One local business that has achieved such status is Laguna Surf and Sport (LS&S). Since 1982 it has operated as the quintessential local surf shop.  The store, like all businesses, has gone through some different iterations through the years. One person who has seen – and contributed to -- a lot of these changes in a very intimate way is Jason Watson. 

A true Laguna local

A Lagunan since the age of two, Watson is a true local. He went through Laguna schools, surfed Laguna waves and, since the age of 17, has worked at LS&S, first as a clerk and then as manager.  “I stayed in Laguna the whole way through,” he says.

However, while Laguna is definitely home, Watson has definitely seen much of the world. “I had a small time, casual career as a professional surfer,” he says. This allowed him to travel, but when he came home, he would pick up where he left off at Laguna Surf and Sport. And he stayed, no matter how many times it changed hands. 

2016 was the last time LS&S changed hands. And, as usual, Watson stayed on.  This time, however, his title changed from manager to owner. 

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Jason Watson, longtime manager, now part-owner of Laguna Surf and Sport

A former boss becomes a partner

His commitment to the store and his longevity were not part of some grand master plan. “When you’re 19-20 it’s a pretty confusing time,” admits Watson. But what helped clarify things was his former boss, now partner, Eric John, the founder of Laguna Surf and Sport. “I met him when I was 17,” explains Watson. “I showed him I was a good worker. I was able to manage surfing and the job…When I think about all that he has done for me I can only hope to do that for someone else.” 

As for what John “did” for Watson, he acted as a mentor. “He gave me a platform. He brought me to meetings that I probably shouldn’t have been brought to. And he helped me figure it out from the ground up,” says Watson. This allowed Watson to become an invaluable part of the business – no matter who owned it. 

It’s hard to let LS&S go 

John has sold and bought back LS&S several times. He first sold it to Swell, only to buy it back. Then in 2008 he sold it again, this time to Volcom, only to again buy it back in 2016 with partners Jason Steris, former CEO of Volcom and Watson. For Watson, the leap from manager to owner was more dramatic than he imagined it would be.

Going from manager to owner is a surprisingly big change

 “It took me a solid year to wrap my head around that change,” says Watson. “The way you run things as an owner is different (than as an employee). Even though I was as committed as a manager as I thought it possible to be…this place is a home to me. It’s so much a second family. But no matter what, when you’re an owner that feeling of having the power to make changes is something I’ve been really feeling these last four to six months. I’m really excited about it.”

The Shop is the first for the family

Laguna Surf and Sport is not the only retail establishment Watson has a stake in. The other one is just a few doors down. Watson’s wife, Jessica, opened The Shop in 2013. She, too, worked under the tutelage of Eric John and, although the stores are different (The Shop is a woman’s boutique), there are, not surprisingly, similarities in business philosophy. The most evident is each store’s knack for capturing a local vibe.

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Inside The Shop, the first store owned by Watson and his wife, Jessica, who opened the store in 2013

 “I leveraged who I was and so did she and so did Eric,” Watson says about getting The Shop off to a good start. Location was also critical. “I thought I have to be able to see it,’” remembers Watson. “These are some of the best blocks in Laguna. To be able to walk a customer out of LS&S and say ‘There (The Shop) is.’ That is definitely one of the biggest things (aiding the The Shop’s growth).”

Making LS&S part of the community beyond the store’s walls

Both retail establishments are bona fide successes. But Watson isn’t sitting back with his feet up on his desk. For him it is critical that LS&S offers more than just “stuff.”

So they are out in the community putting on surf contests, offering surf lessons, sponsoring both the Thurston and Laguna Beach High School surf teams, as well as their own LS&S surf team. Watson feels just as strongly about these things as he does about what is offered inside the store. “I want the guys and girls who are passionate about surfing to feel like this is a second home, like I did,” says Watson.

A real pride in the staff at LS&S

Another way LS&S does this is by hiring really good people, something Watson admits that has not always been the case. Now, however, he gushes like a proud parent about his employees. “I get compliments on my staff all the time. They’re all talented surfers or skaters who leave whatever ego they have at the door when they come to work. They’re just kids learning the ropes, learning customer service. But they learn. They learn how to talk and sell and that’s a big deal to a lot of the companies we work with. They love surf shop employees. They take notes,” says Watson.

 These notes can lead to future employment beyond LS&S, something that clearly pleases Watson and his quest to pay it forward.

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Jason Watson, his wife Jessica and their two children, ages three and one

Hard work, more hard work and dad mode

It also mirrors his own path. “I just hoped through hard work it would work out,” he says when he thinks back to his younger days. “There are a lot of distractions.”  Now, with things pretty well settled, there are still things that shift his focus. These things are a force more powerful than anything: his children, ages one and three. The no sleep, all hands on deck phase of very young children is a life changing event.  With two bustling businesses, in addition to young children to take care of, things like surfing have definitely taken a back seat. “I’m in full dad mode. It’s pretty painful right now,” he says grinning. “I’m enjoying the kids.” 

Surfing hasn’t been entirely abandoned, however.  Offering profuse praise for his wife, Watson says he still gets in a few surf trips a year, although he has become much more discerning about those trips. “I don’t go anywhere when it’s flat,” he says with a laugh. 

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Watson in a place he knows intimately, behind the counter at Laguna Surf and Sport

Bringing LS&S “back on”

“Flat” is a dirty word in surfing and in retail. For the former, only Mother Nature can rectify a no waves day. In retail, however, there is a bit more control. Still, it’s not an easy business. But Watson is philosophical about his chosen field. “Everything is hard,” he says. “I talk to my friends. Everyone is doing different things and we all complain,” he says with a laugh. But whatever complaints Watson may have, he is now in a position to deal with them head on, at least as they relate to Laguna Surf and Sport. 

“It’s good. We have this great surf community. The kids are feeling it. LS&S is back on. It feels a lot better and a lot different that it’s ours again.”


Diana Neff: She loves to live, work, and play to the fullest at her Glennwood House home

By DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

“I wanted to be independent like my sister,” says Diana Neff, as we talk on the patio of Glennwood House, a 42 room independent living facility in Laguna serving special needs adults 18 through 59 years of age.

Behind Diana, the wind ruffles the ocean into peaks in the distance. Almost four years ago, when Diana was barely into her thirties, that wish to be independent was the catalyst that sent her parents in search of a place to satisfy her desire for autonomy. She says, “We looked at other places, but I liked this place.” 

And, not surprisingly, it appears to be a perfect fit. Glennwood’s vision for its residents is an atmosphere in which they can “live, work, play,” and Diana is certainly the embodiment of that vision. Evidently, it’s the right soil in which the seeds of independence bud and flourish. Her days are filled to the brim with friends, work, volunteering, sports, art, exercising, walking, and yoga. With an emphasis on friends.

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Diana enjoys the sun on the Glennwood patio 

As for the “living” part of Glennwood’s mission, the facility provides beautiful and peaceful surroundings, yet it has a community feeling, welcoming and friendly. Diana’s self-reliance also extends to her living conditions, as she has her own room (and an ocean view), and she keeps her own hours. And the location is ideal for walking to the beach or the coffee shop down the street. 

But her schedule doesn’t leave much time for strolling. Not only does she work at Ralph’s Grocery four days a week, she volunteers at the Woman’s Club, for which she received an award for Volunteer of the Year. 

A packed schedule of work, volunteering, and fun

Sherry Neff, her mother, says, “She attended an eight-week serving course at Glennwood put on by the Woman’s Club, and was then invited to serve at events. She’s been doing that on and off for three years.” 

Sometimes these two worlds collide, but in a good way.

Members of the Woman’s Club come to visit Diana at work, and her mother says that when the two of them go walking together, people on the street frequently greet them. One of the reasons Diana loves working at Ralphs is the interaction with customers, where she says, “Almost everyone knows me.”

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Guest Services…Diana happily bagging and talking with local Cindy Fletcher

Aside from being autonomous, having friends appears to be of utmost importance to Diana. “I didn’t have very many friends before, but since living here, I have a lot of friends.”

Her best friend, Tina Cassani, passes us briefly in the hallway.

Sherry explains further, “When Diana was young, it was hard on children with disabilities. They were sent to a school that had a class appropriate for the children, and it was never her home school. She didn’t have friends. The children in her class didn’t live in the neighborhood.”

Diana gains a large network of friends

But now, Sherry says, “She has a few close friends, and the other residents are like an extended family. They all watch out for each other.”

Glennwood also has a bevy of people who assist residents in various endeavors. Since working is encouraged, they facilitate the process by providing a job coach. Diana’s job coach takes her to work, picks her up, and oversees any new assignments or necessary paperwork.

Although Diana is transported to work and back, she does have the opportunity to use the ACCESS bus available through OC Transit Authority. This comes in handy when she goes to Aliso Viejo to do one of her favorite things; help her sister with her nephews (six-month old twins and a two-year old). And three boys under two years of age seems like a situation in which a helping hand is needed. She’s very much looking forward to spending the holidays with them. 

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Dave and Sherry Neff with Diana’s nephews, Thomas, Bryan and Scott

Her mother says that Diana always loved exercise, but aside from skiing with her parents in Mammoth and (encouraged by her sister) running 5ks, she didn’t participate in team sports until she arrived at Glennwood.  And here’s where more friends come in. She’s now a member of the baseball team and plays every Saturday. And she does yoga once a week and spends a half-hour a day on the treadmill in the gym. 

However, there is an artistic side to her as well. Every two weeks, artists from LOCA visit the facility, and now Diana’s parents are the proud recipients of many of her drawings and paintings. And she uses this talent to make cards for her friends and family. Assistant Director Rachel Landers, who has been at Glennwood since its opening, says, “I have three of them on my desk right now.”

Sherry attests to the changes in Diana since she arrived at Glennwood. “She’s grown as an individual. When she was living at home, she didn’t think for herself. She’d ask, ‘Mom, should I do this?’ Now when she’s faced with a decision, she says, ‘Let me think about it.’”

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Gorgeous blossom in the patio garden

Even the neighbors on her parents’ street have noticed a change. “We’ve lived in the same house for 32 years, and the neighbors see how she’s matured,” Sherry says. “And when we’re together or out to dinner, she has so much to talk about now.”

Although it seems as if there is much to like of her new life here, Diana answers the next question without a moment’s hesitation. When asked about what she likes best at Glennwood, she says, “Being independent and having friends. Glennwood has been a good place for me to live. I’ve grown so much. And my parents know I’m safe.” 

Sherry claims that Diana’s time at Glennwood has been a life changer, and allowed Diana to live to the fullest. “I really appreciate the support Laguna Beach has for Glennwood, and how they address those with special needs.”

Living a full life has been hard-won for Diana. But she’s packing about as much as anyone could fit into a day, and it obviously agrees with her. Glennwood has provided an atmosphere in which she canthrive and blossom, and now she’s not wasting any time in that “live, work, play” scenario. Our lovely conversation must wind to an end, as Diana has places to go and people to see.


Meldie Moore: Making a difference for families

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Meldie Moore always wanted to work with children. When she was in college she thought her future would be in child psychology or in teaching. However, her parents had other ideas. “My mom and dad pushed me to thinking about becoming a lawyer,” she says. Not opposed to the idea, but not completely convinced either, Moore says she decided to take both the LSAT and the GRE. As luck would have it, the LSAT test date was first. Moore says she scored very well on the test, “So, I just applied to law school, even though I wasn’t sure I wanted to be a lawyer.”

County Counsel provides a great start to Moore’s career

Moore chose Pepperdine for law school. This meant leaving her east coast roots (she grew up in Ireland and New York) for the unfamiliar land of California. Eventually, Moore merged her interest in helping children and the law when she interned with the County Counsel in Los Angeles. “It was a big test. I wondered if it would be too hard emotionally,” she says. That’s because attorneys in that division work on child abuse, domestic violence and other traumatic incidents. It was a great training ground. Moore was in court every day and this gave her a first hand look at what that kind of advocacy for children looked like.  

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Meldie Moore of Moore Law for Children at her office in Laguna Beach

A “dream job” with the OC District Attorney

Once she graduated law school and it came time to get a “real job,” Moore decided she didn’t want to make a career at County Counsel. “There was this one family who was on their 12th drug baby, or something like that. I was so…I just wanted to put the parents in jail,” she says. So when she got an offer to work for the Orange County District Attorney’s office she jumped at the chance. “It was hard to get a job with the DA’s office,” she says. “And people said Orange County was nice so I snapped it up. It was my dream job.” 

A feeling of fellowship over a 16-year career

For 16 years Moore worked as an Orange County District Attorney. “I felt like I was making a difference. I’m very much about justice and doing what’s right,” she says. “I was only working on cases I believed in.” Not to mention, Moore says she finds being in a trial “very exciting.” There was a bond among all involved in the trial process: the police department, the public defenders and the district attorneys. “There is a feeling of fellowship. You really get to know people, and they were all a really great group of legal professionals.”

Having children changes puts a new perspective on things

About eight years into her career with the DA, Moore says she started trying to have a child. Eventually, Moore and her husband adopted a child and, later, had another child with the help of infertility treatments. With two children at home, Moore decided to take a year off work. When her year hiatus was up, she returned to the job she loved only to find that either it had changed, or she had. “I saw it through different eyes,” she explains. “I now found it a little depressing.” Additionally, working such a rigid job with children at home was proving to be highly stressful. “I wanted more time,” she says.

Making a change that felt right for her family

So when a friend proposed the two team up and start their own firm, Moore says it gave her a lot to consider. “It took me about three months of hard soul searching,” she remembers. “I really loved being a DA, but I had waited so long to have children that I thought this was the best thing for my family.” 

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Moore lives and works in Laguna which makes her life a lot easier

Focusing on children

When she made her decision to leave the DA’s office and go out on her own, Moore says it was tough going at first. She and her partner decided to focus on working with families with special needs children. “I asked if we could do adoptions. She (Moore’s partner) didn’t want to, but said it was OK if I did it.” So Moore did pro bono adoption cases, as well. “I had to learn (a new area of) law and I didn’t really know anyone. It was a very difficult first couple of years.” 

Helping families of special needs children

A cornerstone of their new practice was students with a 504 plan. A 504 plan is part of the civil rights law that serves to prohibit discrimination based on a disability. According to Moore, some of these kids have behavioral problems. This can lead to them eventually getting expelled from school.  Helping the families navigate this is “a good 25 percent of my practice,” says Moore. 

Going solo presents an opportunity to focus on “happy law”

About five and a half years ago Moore’s partner decided to retire. Moore promptly moved her office from Irvine to Laguna where she currently hangs her shingle. 

Location was not the only change that took place.

 “I really started focusing on building up the fertility and adoption side of my practice.” Additionally, the education side of her practice has continued to grow as well, prompting her to hire two more lawyers. She calls this side of her practice “happy law.” “We are helping make people’s dreams come true, expanding their families.” The “schools” side of her practice is not quite as happy, although she finds it equally meaningful. “People only hire attorneys in these situations when things have gotten bad. But it’s still very rewarding. I help families with the most important issue in their lives: their child.”

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Meldie Moore with two associates. She hopes to hire one more in the near future

The ever-elusive work-life balance

Another important issue Moore says she finds personally very challenging is attaining balance. Like most working parents, Moore has a lot on her plate. “I’m trying to be a lawyer, market my business, run my business and be there for my family. I’m certainly not balanced, but I know it’s important, and I try!” 

Living and working in Laguna helps – a lot

Having other attorneys has helped. “They give me more flexibility,” she says. However, her days have her running from one thing to another. The day we met she was heading off to her son’s performance and then running into a meeting immediately after. “Living and working in Laguna allows me to do that,” she says.

And why Laguna? “When I first came to Orange County people said Newport Beach is nice. I lived there, and I liked it. Then I moved to CdM (Corona del Mar) and I liked it. But then my friend and I came to Laguna and we said, ‘We’re going to live here one day.’ I just fell in love with it.” She says her friend never made it, but clearly Meldie Moore has.


Jessica Byrne: From Paintbox to pastries to PedalBox, a new high-concept gym, it’s all about hospitality – which is in her DNA

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photos by Mary Hurlbut and Drew Fuerstman

Welcome to the season of calories, cocktails and holiday stress. It’s the month when even the strongest among us can lose her resolve. Fortunately, there’s an amazing new way to pay for December’s indulgences. And it’s delivered by a woman who has hospitality—and all the hallmarks of exceptional service—written into her DNA. 

PedalBox Gym, now open in Dana Point, is owned and operated by Jessica Fuerstman Byrne and her husband, Duncan Byrne. It’s the first gym in Orange County to combine the Schwinn Airdyne bike with boxing and other HIIT exercises to create a high intensity, low impact workout that will blast both stress and calories without taking a toll on the joints. It’s tailored to accommodate every age and workout level, and it will kick your bootie while leaving you begging for more (I say this from personal experience).

A history of hospitality

Hospitality has been handed down through the generations in the Fuerstman family. Jessica is the daughter of Alan Fuerstman, founder and CEO of Montage Hotel group. 

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Photo by Mary Hurlbut

Hospitality is in their DNA, whether at a hotel or boxing gym

Alan began in the hospitality business when he was in high school. His father was a dentist, a profession that requires the utmost care and client support. “My parents were strong role models,” says Alan. “I grew up watching how they dealt with people. They were very nurturing and gracious, and provided a great example of how to treat those who worked for them.” 

Alan has spent his life in the luxury hotel industry, starting as a doorman in the Marriott when he was a senior in high school. Through the years, he worked as the president and managing director of The Phoenician resort in Arizona, and was recruited by Steve Wynn to open the Bellagio. 

Montage Resort first opened in Laguna in 2002. The concept was to create a gracious and humble approach to luxury. “Many of these hotels are too pretentious and stuffy,” says Alan. “I wanted our clients to feel as comfortable wearing jeans as wearing suits.”

Alan passed along that humble mentality to his own children, instilling a sense of casual elegance and grace, coupled with the ability to be highly attuned to people’s needs. The result is a daughter who’s driven to succeed, and completely comfortable in her own skin. 

Jessica works hard. She isn’t afraid to take risks. And she’s well-positioned to bring her father’s style and level of service into her gym. 

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Photo by Mary Hurlbut

Jessica works hard and isn’t afraid to take risks

“No one wants to feel out of place or look stupid,” says Jessica. “If you can get someone to shrug that off, it’s amazing.”

“That’s similar to fine dining,” adds Alan. “Everyone wants to feel like they belong.” Worrying about which fork to use isn’t conducive to a good experience. Removing that intimidation factor is something father and daughter do best.

From Paintbox to Pedalbox—growing up Montage

Jessica started working at Montage Resort when she was only 17. She began as a counselor at Paintbox, the children’s program offered by the resort. She also worked at the pool as a hostess before heading to college at the University of Arizona. 

Ultimately, Jessica found her passion in pastries. She studied at both the Loft and the Studio restaurants at the Montage before getting her culinary degree at Le Cordon Bleu in London. “I wanted to learn the science behind the pastries,” she says. That desire to achieve mastery over every detail and chemical combination in cooking carries through to her approach at the gym. She’s a perfectionist about form and technique.

A match made in . . . the gym

Jessica met Duncan in London. In a gym, of course. “I’d always been active,” she says. “Fitness had been an important part of my life.” So, during the course of her culinary training at Le Cordon Bleu, Jessica joined a gym.

Husband Duncan has worked as a strength and conditioning coach for over a decade. He has extensive experience in boxing, CrossFit, weightlifting, personal training, and strength and conditioning training. 

Once they decided to get married, Jessica turned her full attention toward getting in shape for the wedding. Duncan wooed her away from desserts and now she dedicates her days to PedalBox.

The PedalBox difference

It’s difficult for gyms to distinguish themselves. Especially in southern Orange County, where it seems there are as many trainers as there are clients. So when I first heard the concept, I was skeptical. What could be so different?

The unique (and grueling) combination of the bike and boxing is the first thing to note. The Schwinn Airdyne bike, different from spin bikes and other cycling training, is designed to increase its resistance in direct proportion to how hard you’re working. The harder you work, the harder it gets. It also incorporates your arms, giving you a fuller body workout. The best part? The bike generates a powerful fan that cools you off as you go. After 40 seconds going all out, you’ll appreciate the breeze. And you’ll get an intense cardio workout in record-fast time. 

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Photo by Drew Fuerstman

The combination of bikes and boxing sets PedalBox apart

From the bike, you’ll begin to box. Boxing had me worried. I’d never boxed, and coordination isn’t my strong suit. This is where Jessica and Duncan bring their unique skillset to the PedalBox experience with flawless technique, endless patience, and serious motivation. Even after a few minutes spent with them, I began picking up the basic techniques. (At least they said I did, so let’s go with that.)

Coming off the CrossFit craze, Jessica and Duncan found they loved the high intensity workouts, but didn’t love how hard it was on the body. It’s easy to get hurt. CrossFit workouts are hard on the joints, and the risk of injury from combining strength with speed is high. So Jessica and Duncan found a new way to maintain that intensity while removing the risks.

The proof is in the pedaling … and boxing

Even for the most seasoned gym rat, a new workout is intimidating. Boxing, to me, sounded synonymous with feeling foolish. “Think of it like dancing,” Duncan told me. That definitely didn’t help this uncoordinated client. But one thing Duncan and Jessica have down is quality instruction, service and training. They’re motivating. They’re encouraging. And at no point did I feel self-conscious. 

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Photo by Mary Hurlbut

Father and daughter hold impromptu business meeting following the photoshoot

Jessica and Duncan meet you where you are. Every workout is scaled for every skill-level and ability. Class sizes are small to maximize personal attention and ensure proper form.

More important, the workout is intense. And fun! The mental energy required in boxing takes your mind off how hard you’re working. Time passes exponentially faster when all your concentration is on a series of steps, instead of the clock. The music is motivating—always something with a strong beat because boxing is a rhythmic sport.

“Boxing is empowering,” says Jessica. “It’s something I don’t get from weightlifting or cardio. It makes me feel like a badass.”

Indeed, it does.

A gift to yourself this season

We’re entering into the season of resolutions. After all the indulgences, it’s time to do something good for yourself. Jessica and Duncan make that as easy in the gym as Alan makes it in his resorts. The key is creating an experience that makes clients want to come back by being attuned to every customer’s needs. Jessica has been cultivating that skill for a lifetime. It makes PedalBox an inspiring place to discover how much you have in you. You’ll be surprised . . . it’s more than you think.

PedalBox is located at 24470 Del Prado Ave, Dana Point, CA 92629, inside Rado’s Fitness. In addition to 60-minute circuit training classes, they offer personal training sessions and a lunchtime bootcamp. Visit their website, www.pedalboxgym.com, for more information.


Laura Linsenmayer: Back to her ROOTS, and driven by the moon to find her “magical vortex”

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by: Mary Hurlbut

Laura Linsenmayer, owner of ROOTS the Beauty Underground, says she finds it “hilarious” that Laguna is where she ended up. After moving here in sixth grade she says when she graduated from Laguna Beach High School, “I was the classic case of ‘I’m leaving my hometown and I’m never coming back!’” So she set out to “find herself” by living in Florida, Park City, Los Angeles and Connecticut. The plan was to move every two years because, as she explains it, “that gave me ample time to build roots there. I just kept doing that.”

A surprise homecoming

“That” stopped when she decided she had learned enough from running other people’s businesses and was ready to open her own. “I never even considered coming back home,” she says. Rather, it was her family’s suggestion. They must have been persuasive because Linsenmayer opened her shop in the Lumberyard Plaza on August 1, 2012. 

A good omen helps launch ROOTS the Beauty Underground

“From the date of conception until I opened my doors it was nine months,” she says, completely grasping the symbolism. “When I fully committed in my soul it was a divine lead. Everything presented itself really smoothly; everything unfolded so flawlessly I knew it was the right thing to do.” The fact that August 1 happened to be a full moon was one more good omen. “I’m driven by the moon,” she says.

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Laura Linsenmayer, owner of ROOTS the Beauty Underground in Laguna Beach

13 binders full of research provide the blueprint

Linsenmayer is also driven by a desire to help people. Her enthusiasm for her business is sincere and infectious. However, it was not necessarily part of a grand master plan. “I always knew I’d be in the beauty industry,” she says. She went to beauty school at 18 and has worked in some facet of the industry ever since. Every job she took she considered “research” for her future business, whatever that might be. She was so committed she wrote down things she thought worked and, more importantly, things she didn’t, eventually filling 13 binders. These binders became the blueprint for ROOTS the Beauty Underground.

Enlightenment leads to a business idea

While she was methodical with her experiences, the actual idea for her business was more happenstance. She had moved to LA and was walking her neighborhood looking for work. She walked into an organic hair salon. “I was just drawn to these girls,” she says. She listened and learned. “Once you’ve been enlightened you can never go back. I just got deeper into it.” The idea of natural, non-toxic beauty products took hold. “It was important for me to find a niche that required depth. This was it,” she explains. So she dove in, learned all she could and launched ROOTS the Beauty Underground.

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The “magical vortex” where ROOTS has been for six years

SIx years ago the idea of all natural beauty products, while not new, was not nearly as ubiquitous as it is now. There was enough of a market, however, that customers sought her out in her tucked away location, a “magical vortex,” she calls it. She made sure the products she carried had a store locator list on their website. “That was the root of how people started to find me,” she says. (Sidenote, Linsenmayer uses the word “root” a lot in her conversation. Just one more example of how connected she is to her business.)

Providing customer service that is unparalleled

Now, with her customers being split an even 50/50 locals and out of towners, Linsenmayer says her concern isn’t so much raising awareness about the store, it’s battling the Amazon effect. “We need to provide an experience they can’t,” she says. “The depth we go to is unparalleled. We won’t stop until we get you your perfect program.”

It’s all about the education

Linsenmayer and her team do that with education. “We’re educators first and foremost,” she says emphatically. “I want people to know they can come in here and just learn. There’s no pressure to buy anything. Come in for the education and leave feeling better about yourself.”

An area where education is making huge inroads is with her hair salon. People used to think organic hair color didn’t work effectively. “Now,” she says, “the word is out that it does work and it’s fabulous. It’s so fun to watch the graph go up in that area of the business.” 

The importance of what we wear is comparable to what we eat

Like all businesses, Linsenmayer has had to make adjustments to her inventory. One that has been a surprise is her now minimal kids section. “When I opened I had a really extensive kids section,” she says. “I have been surprised over the years that parents weren’t more enthusiastic about buying these (non-toxic) products for their kids,” she says. As more information comes out about what is in much of that we put on our body, this may change. “These products,” explains Linsenmayer, “hold just as much power (over our health) as food does.”

Non-toxic beauty products will eventually become “the norm”

That’s why she believes the idea of natural, non-toxic beauty products is going to become the norm in the future. “The toxic products industry won’t last much longer,” she says confidently. Her goal is to spread the word about non-toxic products across the country. And she’d love to help others do the same.

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Laura Linsenmayer works her magic with her non-toxic products on a client

Hoping to help others by providing them with her plan

It took Linsenmayer 20 years of research to learn what she needed to learn to open her business and keep it thriving. “I couldn’t have done it if I had a kid or a husband,” she says. A future goal is to put everything she has learned, from products to procedures, into a business plan so that others can do what she has done, albeit under their own name. “I would love for people from all over to say ‘I want to open a store like yours’ and I could provide the business plans and systems operations and they can put their name on it.” That speaks to her passion for what has clearly become a mission.

Striving to help Mom feel good

And passion is something Linsenmayer has a lot of. Not just for her business, but for the natural products industry as a whole. She also really, really, really wants to help people look and feel their best. “My favorite thing is making people feel good about themselves. That’s where it’s at. When Mom feels good everybody wins. That is so cool!” she says excitedly.

Six years in and feeling like she’s just getting started

So if you’re in the market for a cleanser or a lip gloss or need a new hair stylist, Linsenmayer and her staff are here to help. For someone who never intended to return home, Linsenmayer chuckles at the fact that she now attends city council meetings. She has also now has a new appreciation for her hometown. “I didn’t understand how special it was being from a small town.” And even though she is back in that small town for awhile now, there are still people who haven’t found her shop yet. “People come in and say, ‘How did I not know you were here?’ I love that! I feel like I’m just getting started.”


Jim Beres: Dedicated to staying connected to community concerns

Story by DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

What do Laguna Beach residents and visitors complain most about? Not a tough question. Parking. And Jim Beres, Civilian Services Administrator for the Laguna Beach Police Department, and one of three Division Commanders, is the man who fields all the complaints, questions, and concerns regarding this touchy and sometimes volatile topic. 

But that’s only one of the many hats he wears. In addition to managing Parking Services, he is also in charge of the Chaplain Program, Beach Patrol, Police Aides, Citizens on Patrol, and Animal Services. 

That’s a lot of hats.

And he’s been wearing them for quite a while. Jim has been with the LBPD for eight years this January, after positions in civilian law enforcement beginning in Orange (where he started as a police cadet), Stanton, Costa Mesa, and most recently before joining LBPD, El Monte, where he worked for sixteen years.

“On my days off in El Monte, for two and a half years, I worked part time in Costa Mesa. El Monte was very different from Laguna,” Jim says. “It’s a much larger city with 121,000 residents.”

It may have been larger, but few cities have the influx of people each year that Laguna does, a number that he says averages 6.3 million a year. With the overwhelming goal of accommodating both residents and visitors, the services that he manages ensure the city runs efficiently. That’s a gargantuan job, not one that many would want to tackle.

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Jim manages six different divisions

However, Jim appears to approach it with firm resolve (and a jar of pistachios on his desk though I would think it might be aspirin instead). It’s just business as usual.

A major factor in this “business as usual,” is outreach, based on the community policing efforts Chief Laura Farinella instituted in 2015.

Jim explains, “We go out to talk to our customers – our residents, visitors and employees of the city – to find out if we’re meeting their needs. You need to go out periodically into the community and ask, rather than waiting for them to come to you. Otherwise, sometimes the problem metastasizes. Part of contemporary community policing is going proactively out into the field.” 

They accomplish this in a variety of ways. Some of the meetings address specific issues with residents (such as coyotes), others are free form in which the audience brings up concerns, and then there are the traditional meet and greets. Several Coffee with Cops have taken place, the most recent at Moulin Bistro, a few at private homes. As with other members of the LBPD, Jim has a high visibility factor in town.

New member of Parking Services

On this beautiful day before Thanksgiving, we start on a light note and another highly visible representative of the LBPD. Jim is particularly proud and happy to show us (our photographer Mary and me) the new Hyundai Ioniq car, the first to replace one of the parking services older Prius models. He did quite a bit of research before settling on this make and model as the best replacement option. 

 “It has better performance,” Jim says. “And the amenities were all included.”

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Jim during a brief respite  

Parking Services employs four full-time parking officers and one full-time senior parking service officer, who provide service seven days a week. Next Jim will go to the City Council to get the second car approved, and eventually hopes to replace all the older vehicles.

Discussing parking vehicles migrates into the issue of parking. Because he’s the man in charge, he receives 30-40 emails a day, a high number of them addressing parking; from complaints about parking citations (which he must investigate), to a neighborhood dispute about someone bringing home a work truck or multiple cars parking on the street, or the receipt of a ticket in a parking structure because the permit was not in view. One can imagine the emails are mostly negative, but Jim says there are the benign inquiries from summer visitors regarding parking regulations and questions such as, “Do the meters take credit cards?”

Three common misconceptions

And this brings up a misconception that Jim quickly debunks.

“There is no quota on parking tickets,” Jim says. “It’s illegal per state law, a misdemeanor, for the city to establish a quota.”

First myth exposed. But there are more. Do residents know where the parking fine monies go? 

 “We work differently than other cities. All parking fine revenue goes into a capital improvement fund,” Jim says, “for public work projects, such as street improvements and tennis court reconstruction. No one likes to get a parking ticket, but maybe there’s a pothole out there with your name on it.” 

Jim emphasizes the benefits of residents using parking permits (particularly the shopper permit, which is a bargain at $40 a year, bought every two years for $80), but cautions that even though there are five different kinds, the posted time limits still apply.

“This doesn’t have to do with Civilian Services, but we frequently ask participants at meetings if they know how many officers are on patrol at one time,” Jim continues. “Usually the answer is much higher, but on a typical day there are four to five sworn officers on duty.” Which he further explains makes it necessary to prioritize and make realistic choices regarding calls.

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New Hyundai Ioniq replacement vehicle for Parking Services

However, one of the biggest misconceptions that he demystified pertains to neighborhood street parking permits, which is a major topic of discussion among North Laguna residents living close to restaurants. Jim sets me straight on the subject. 

There is one residential parking permit district, the quiet zone, in place near Mozambique, but the City’s hands are tied granting additional ones. “The California Coastal Commission states that Laguna Beach is not allowed to establish any new permit zones,” he says. “Their mission is to maintain access to the coast for all, residents and non-residents alike. Anything that impacts non-residents’ ability to access the coast in an equal manner is problematic for them.” And this is the case with all coastal cities in CA.

Unfortunate news for residents in North Laguna, Alta Laguna, South Laguna (around 8th and 9th streets), and those who live near the high school, who have rallied for parking permit districts. 

Value of Police Aides and Citizens Patrol

However, there are issues, such as traffic, that have been addressed in ways that should please residents and visitors alike.

If you’ve ever tried to navigate the downtown area on a summer weekend, you must give kudos to the Police Aides in the bright yellow vests who direct traffic and keep the traffic flowing. These young men and women, some in the process of getting their degrees, are looking to get into law enforcement. This is a grueling job. Not only do they stand on their feet for six to seven hours a day, they must maintain complete focus, and constantly communicate with the other aides in the area to safely keep cars moving.

“It’s a really valuable program,” Jim says. “It helps the traffic flow smoother than it otherwise would. It’s tough because Laguna Beach isn’t designed for the volume of traffic that goes through. There’s not much we can do. Given the nature of the city, it’s not as if we can widen the streets or put in more turn lanes. It is what it is, and we just have to make it work the best we can.”

 Another area Jim oversees, is Citizens on Patrol, or sometimes known as Seniors on Patrol, though he emphasizes that recruits need not be seniors, but must be over 18 years of age. Volunteers complete an eight-week training program and are then qualified to apply to be a COP and participate in various support tasks (vacation home checks, meet the public, assist with traffic and parking enforcement, and fire/flood watch). COPs wear uniforms and drive city cars. They also transport various items (DNA samples, for example) to the crime lab. Currently, the COP has 12-14 volunteers.

They are indispensable to the force, but Jim says, ‘They are never in harm’s way.”

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An antidote for stress

Another of the services, Beach Patrol, that Jim oversees, was established after meetings with South Laguna residents, who were concerned about the nuisance activity caused by increased visitors to beaches (West St, Thousand Steps) whose popularity has spread via social media. 

As an outcome of these community meetings, two Beach patrol officers were hired, and, after the voters approved Measure LL, two more were added. There are also several part-time Beach Patrol Officers during the summer season. The feedback from the residents in that area is that the problems were reduced.

Most of citations they issue are for alcohol, (active consumption, open containers, minors in possession, or glass containers on the beach). In addition to beaches, they also patrol parks and the wilderness.

Counseling and emotional support

In addition, Jim manages the Chaplain Program, which currently has two volunteers. The LBPD relies on the faith based community to provide support and assist the Police Department on a volunteer basis, providing emotional support and counseling to victims of crimes and their families, as well as Department personnel and their families.

Pastor George Sabolick has been a volunteer with LBPD for over 15 years and provides counseling to officers on call.

The senior pastor for Calvary Chapel Seaside, Kurt Shonheinz, has been with the Department for 10 years. He can be seen in the police department almost weekly.

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The emails never ends

And certainly, the last two of Jim’s responsibilities are dear to my heart – the Animal Shelter and the Dog Park. Serving Laguna Beach and Laguna Woods, the shelter offers temporary care of sick, injured, and stray or abandoned animals rescued by the animal service officers.

The City employs three full-time animal service officers, who provide animal control services seven days a week. Their job is to enforce animal related laws, rules, and regulations in Laguna Beach and Laguna Woods. However, they also assist in incidents involving coyotes, marine mammals, rattlesnakes, and other animal related matters.

Partnership with the community

As stated on the LBPD website, “The mission of the Laguna Beach Police Department is to preserve human rights and enhance the quality of life through equitable law enforcement and responsive public service, in partnership with the community.”

It’s difficult to believe that all the departments mentioned above are maintained by one person, Jim Beres. He oversees a wide spectrum of services, seemingly switching hats as required. After spending only an hour with him, I realize just how big a role “partnership with the community” truly plays in his management acumen, and just how much the residents of Laguna Beach have benefited from that vision.

For further information on the LBPD, go to www.lagunabeachcity.net/cityhall/police.


Retain Laguna’s tradition with chic new twists: That’s the goal of sisters Hasty Honarkar and Nikki Bostwick

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

There are some longtime residents who lament the loss of old Laguna. The town isn’t the same, they say, since the 1960s and 70s. Gone are the hippies and bohemians. Gone are some iconic spots—the Boom Boom Room, the Cottage, the movie theater. The battle is on between commercialism and charm, between locals and tourists, between the old and new. The nostalgists will tell you the greatest generation is fading away, and the younger population can’t afford to live here. They will tell you fewer and fewer people get the town. They long for the good ol’ days, while trying to remain optimistic about the future.

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Sisters Nikki Bostwick and Hasty Honarkar

Nikki Bostwick (27) and Hasty Honarkar (29) may represent Laguna’s strongest bridge between the generations. They’re passionate about preserving the charm of the town while injecting a chic and vibrant twist. These two sisters—with their sense of millennial style and creative design—are reimagining Laguna’s traditional roots one space at a time. 

A culture of caring, a head for hard work

Hasty and Nikki were brought up on hard work, imagination and gratitude. Their father, Mo Honarkar, moved to the United States from Iran when he was 20. He’d come to California before the Iranian revolution and then realized there was no reasonable path back. “He worked three jobs and went to UCI,” says Nikki. “A bus driver, an ice cream vendor, there’s nothing he wouldn’t do.” Their father made it possible for his whole family to immigrate—his wife, four of his five siblings, his parents, cousins, nieces and nephews all came to Orange County because of Mo. “He built everything all on his own,” says Nikki. 

The extended family stays tight. They see each other every week. Holidays are spent at the Royal Hawaiian (which Mo owns), or picnics at Heisler Park. “It always looks like a scene out of My Big Fat Greek Wedding,” laughs Hasty. The Honarkars have an open-door policy when it comes to celebrations. “If someone doesn’t have somewhere to go,” says Hasty, “they’re with us.” 

The strength of sisterhood

The sisters say they’re opposites, yet similar, at the same time. “We’re better sisters when we don’t work together,” they both say. But that doesn’t mean they don’t bounce ideas off each other, and come to each other for support.

Their affection for each other is clear. Hasty and Nikki sit close on the couch. One will finish a sentence the other started. They seem in sync, one often seeming to know the other better than she knows herself. 

When Nikki talks about marrying Eric, her high school sweetheart, Hasty’s face lights up. Her sister’s joy is also her own. 

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The sisters in Nikki’s store, The Fullest

They talk about raising their dogs like raising their future children. Hasty has two—a French bulldog and a puggle—who she describes as “plump and old.” Nikki has a Siberian husky named Cessna, who has all the envied energy of youth. “I keep looking for a pet psychic or therapist for Nikki’s dog,” says Hasty. She’s that invested in the canine cousins getting along.

Hasty’s head for business and passion for urban planning 

Hasty has worked with her father since she was a teen. She has a head for business and a heart that’s always belonged in Laguna. She tested out of high school when she was 15, moving briefly to Arizona to start her college career. “I cried every time I drove away. I came back after a year,” says Hasty. “Laguna is so cool. It’s fun and quirky and hippy, and yet so beautiful. It’s no wonder no one wants to leave.”

“Though you appreciate it more when you go and come back,” says Nikki, who spent some time in Oregon for college.

Hasty is fascinated by culture, geography and business. She changed her majors several times, studying environmental studies, product development, urban planning and more at UCLA. All these fields have helped in her current role as Vice President of 4G Ventures, a real estate development and hospitality business she runs with her father. Together they manage a portfolio of businesses—restaurants, hotels, residential properties, office spaces and venues that include Seven Degrees, the Royal Hawaiian, 14 West Boutique Hotel and many more. The company began after the Honarkars sold 4G Wireless, Verizon’s largest retailer on the west coast.

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Hasty Honarkar knows quality and creativity, in clothes and at work

“Laguna has a long history of being an incubator for creative minds,” says Hasty. “I want to build roots here for my family and my business. I want to raise children here, and watch my dad do what he loves in the community he loves. There’s nowhere else we want to go.”

Hasty says the danger for many local Laguna Beach businesses is their focus on revenue and making the steep rent. “It’s easy to forget the soul of the town when you’re caught up in revenue.” Her goal is to bring back these old projects that represent the heart and history of Laguna.

The Royal Hawaiian’s past, present and future

The Royal Hawaiian might be the best embodiment of the Honarkars’ vision to retain Laguna’s traditions while offering chic new twists. The island-inspired restaurant and bar has been an iconic Laguna staple since 1947, offering their famous (and dangerous) Lapu Lapus and transporting Orange County guests on a quick Hawaiian getaway. Over time, though, the place began to look tired. High rents, music restrictions, and a downturn in the economy forced the restaurant to close its doors in 2012. 

Three years later, Mo and Hasty arrived to save the day. They’ve revitalized the space, retaining all the traditions—banana leaves, pineapples, tiki torches and, of course, the beloved Lapu Lapu—while offering updated elements that allow the space to feel contemporary and relevant to new generations. The result, they say, is “tiki chic.”

For example, the old Lapu Lapu recipe called for canned juices from concentrate (which translated to a heck of a hangover). Now the local favorite is made from all freshly squeezed juices. Voila! The same . . . but better. They also showcase local artists who both represent the upcoming talent of the town while keeping with the artistic traditions of the past.

The goal is to give Laguna locals a place to feel nostalgic while also giving the next generation a chance to make new memories.

How Nikki’s obsession with wellness led to the Fullest

Nikki’s endeavors tend more toward lifestyle and wellness than business. Nikki is the founder of the Fullest, an online and bi-annual print magazine, and now a pop-up boutique shop in North Laguna. 

Nikki confesses she was a bit of a wild child at Laguna Beach High. But then she found yoga, specifically Bikram, and it helped her through a hard time. “I did a 180 degree turn in life,” she says. “Yoga changed everything for me.” It led her to culinary school to study raw food, vegan cooking, and wellness principles. Now she wants to bring that knowledge to her clients. 

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Nikki’s The Fullest magazine

Nikki’s recently launched pop-up boutique reflects the ideas of the Fullest. The space mirrors the website and the magazine—clean, light and airy—a place where clients can come to clear their minds and rejuvenate. She offers a sparse inventory of clothing, accessories, skincare, and home décor that follows this theme. Linens, teas, serums—items intended to promote a clean lifestyle.

The shop has a big comfy couch and chairs you can sink into all afternoon (I know this from personal experience). “I want a space where people feel comfortable just sitting, reading, or talking,” Nikki says. “I want this to be a place where we can build community, not just buy things.”

The Fullest offers yoga classes several times a week. Kundalini yoga focuses primarily on the breath. “It’s more spiritual,” says Nikki. “Good for the nervous system, circulation, and blood flow. I wanted to offer something that can’t otherwise be found in Orange County.”

Nikki also opens the space for a variety of other lifestyle and wellness workshops—a wreath making class, an organic bakery featuring a local artisan whom mills her own flour. She’s even starting a jogger’s club. On Saturday mornings at 9 a.m., the shop is the starting point where runners can meet up and return for a weekend inspired run.

Wellness, for Nikki, doesn’t mean deprivation or stressing over exercise. At one point in her life, she was militant about her diet and found it didn’t serve her. “Wellness isn’t just the food you eat and the way you move. It’s intention behind everything you do. Whatever makes you happy—that’s wellness. Stressing out about eating healthy is worse for you.” When Nikki discovered she could no longer eat at her grandmother’s house, enjoy her favorite meals, or share food with friends, she realized it was time for a new approach. 

“Fashion, art, music, self-expression—both the people making the art and the consumers enjoying it—that’s all part of a happy lifestyle. I’m hoping to bring that back to Laguna, because that’s what Laguna was based on. No restrictions. Just free-thinking and free expression.”

An Ohana state of mind

Ohana, in Hawaiian, means family (in an extended sense of the term, including blood-related, adoptive and intentional members). The concept emphasizes that families are bound together and members must cooperate and remember one another. Ohana is a concept this family embodies. It stretches back to their roots in Iran. It includes their extended family, all those who have immigrated to Orange County. And now it’s embracing the rich traditions of Laguna Beach and the upcoming generations who want to call Laguna home. The Honarkars are laying down a foundation for Laguna’s future. All of our town’s rich, artistic traditions…with a twist.


Lisi Harrison: A best-selling author gets “Dirty”

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

When Lisi Harrison came to Laguna 10 years ago she was looking for a change. After leaving her prior life in New York City, Laguna definitely gave her that. However, making big changes was not something she was unfamiliar with. A Canadian by birth, Harrison had also lived in Boston and Philadelphia. Driven by the need to explore, Harrison says she left Canada for Boston during her college years because, “It just got me away from everything I knew. It allowed me to figure out who I was.”

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Lisi Harrison with her beloved writing companion

“The Dirty Book Club” is for adults

This decision to leave everything she knew behind her proved to be prudent, as who Lisi Harrison became while on this journey to self-discovery turned out to be a best-selling author. Her credits include the young adult series “The Clique,” “The Pretenders,” “The Alphas,” and “Monster High.” As of October 10 she had a new credit to add to her list: “The Dirty Book Club” hit bookstores on that date. This time, however, her audience is adults. 

How the real Dirty Book Club was formed

As with most creative endeavors, one never knows when inspiration will strike. Harrison says it struck her while she was talking to some women – total strangers – at the Coyote Grill. “We started talking about Judy Blume’s (novel) ‘Forever’ and how it was the first dirty book any of us had read. We started bonding over this very quickly,” remembers Harrison. 

Those women, now friends as a result of their discussion about the book, agreed to read it again and meet up later to discuss. That’s how Harrison’s real-life Dirty Book Club was formed. 

A challenge to try something new

Since art frequently imitates life, she decided that this premise of a dirty book club would make a really good novel. “I’ll do it for young adults because that’s what I do,” she remembers thinking. That is, until one of the women from her book club suggested she write it for adults. “This became very challenging for me,” says Harrison. “I had this great title but then I had to live up to it.” 

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Lisi Harrison’s books

From erotica to the power of friendship

She says when she first started writing, the novel “50 Shades of Grey” had just come out. Its popularity (combined with the title of her book) compelled to try her hand writing erotica. “I failed miserably,” she says with a laugh. “I had to figure out why I was writing this book. Finally, I realized it was about the power of female friendship.” Again, art imitating life.

A much-needed break turns into burnout

The novel took more time than she’d planned, but once finished Harrison says she planned on taking a much-deserved break. Unfortunately, life, as they say, had other plans. “It’s much different promoting a book in 2017 than it was in 2007,” she says wearily. “So you take a person, who’s not an extrovert, going out there and saying “Hey, let me sell you something!’” Additionally, during this “break” she felt compelled to “reclaim” her social media presence, also not an easy task. The result? Complete burnout. “I had not written a word since January,” she says with mild incredulity.

However, there are signs of resurgence. As of this past Monday, Harrison says she finally sat down and started writing a chapter. “It felt like I was home again. I’m done with all of this ancillary chaos. I want to get back to doing what I love doing.” 

Harrison says it’s too soon to tell if the chapter she started on Monday will become a book, but at least there’s no doubt that another book will be coming – eventually. While the next one percolates, Harrison says she’s recharged enough to come to your book club, dirty or otherwise, if you happen to be discussing her “Dirty Book Club” (her novel, not her group). “I will Skype into anybody’s book club. I would love to do that,” she says enthusiastically. 

Jumping at opportunities post-college

If you do invite her, perhaps you can ask her, as a side note, about her journey from college grad to best-selling author to Laguna Beach resident. It is a great lesson in making the most of one’s opportunities, as well as just plain old perseverance. While attending McGill University in Montreal (“The Harvard of Canada,” she explains, adding somewhat archly, “Harvard people hate it when you say that.”), she realized she wanted a more robust arts program. She found one at Emerson College in Boston. 

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Self-explanatory

She completed her studies earning a BFA in Creative Writing. She says she followed a boyfriend to Philadelphia and then, somewhat impetuously, took a job in New York. “A friend said he could get me a job at MTV so I basically just jumped on the train and went.” 

A job at MTV turns into a career

Even the job at MTV was somewhat of a lark since Harrison says she didn’t really know what it was. “They don’t have MTV in Canada, and when I was a student I could never afford cable so it was completely foreign to me,” she says. Nevertheless, she got a job in casting (and then ended up being given the job of the friend who hired her in the first place, something Harrison describes as “very awkward”). Twelve years later, she had worked her way up to Senior Director of Development. “MTV was the most fun I’ve ever had in my life,” she says. “We were all young, in our early 20’s, with tremendous responsibility and no guidance, being fully exploited and harassed. It was great,” she says laughing.

Still, the desire to write was there

But while she was enjoying her career at MTV there was still this thing she couldn’t give up on: the desire to write. So she would work her “day job” at MTV from 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. and then come home and start writing. She says she’d wake up some mornings in tears she was so tired, but she was determined. “This is what I wanted to do. I just felt like an ass if I didn’t go for it,” she says. And her persistence paid off. She wrote her first two novels while still at MTV, “The Clique” and “Best Friends For Never.” When the latter debuted at #7 on the New York Times best-seller list she left MTV and pursued writing full time.

Leaving New York for Laguna

So how did this self-described city girl who was having the time of her life in New York finally end up in Laguna? It mostly had to do with kids. Married and with a new addition to the family, a son, and another baby on the way, Harrison says New York lost some of its luster. “When it stops being about you, when it starts being about the kids, New York is just not conducive to that. We just wanted an easier lifestyle.” Laguna was designated as that “easier lifestyle” because her now ex-husband, who is a surfer from Virginia, had visited Laguna and decided it was a pretty special place. Plus it checked one of Harrison’s boxes: a warm climate.

Becoming a true “Californian”

Being from Canada, Harrison was on a mission to live somewhere warm. With ten years under her belt, it looks as though she has acclimated to California-living quite well. So well, in fact, that when we met it was a pleasant 70 degrees (at the very least) yet Harrison decided she was chilly enough that she needed to put on her sweater. Nothing screams “Californian” more than being cold in temperatures the rest of the country finds positively balmy.

Learning to “restock the pond” at the beach

As with any change, there are trade-offs. Likening one’s imagination to a pond that needs replenishing after each artistic endeavor, Harrison says just walking out the door in New York helped “restock the pond.” In Laguna, where, she says, “It’s the same weather, same people…it’s like being in the Apple store all the time…” refilling the pond is a bit trickier. But what she lost in terms of stimulation, she gained in feeling the embrace of her new community. 

Community and the art of the potluck

“The community here blew me away. I kept thinking, ‘Why are these people so nice? Why do they keep inviting us to all of these potlucks?!’” It certainly wasn’t for her culinary skills. Not versed in the manner of potlucks or small town living, Harrison says she decided she’d pick up some garlic bread from “this little Italian place” she discovered to bring as her contribution to her first Laguna Beach potluck. She transferred the bread to one of her trays to look like she made it and voila! Instant potluck offering.

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Lisi is back at work

Unfortunately, since there are only a handful of Italian places in Laguna (quite different from New York) one of the guests took a bite of “her” garlic bread and asked, “Is this from Gina’s?” Whoops.

Now Harrison can undoubtedly potluck with the best of them. And there is no doubt as to where she belongs. Laguna is where her kids are growing up and there is probably no stronger definition of home than that. However, we can all agree that Laguna is not New York City. So to keep that part of her alive, Harrison satisfies herself with taking her kids to visit often so everyone can get a taste of what she (and they) left behind. 

There is no doubt she has embraced left coast living. However, she can’t quite shake the allure of one of the most bustling of all bustling metropolises. “Laguna is home. But my soul in in New York,” she says.


Buy Hand: Retail curated with a conscience – and Reddy charm

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Opening a retail business is always a risky venture. Opening a retail business during a lingering recession, the Great Recession, no less, could be considered complete folly. Despite the obvious timing issues, Kavita Reddy opened her shop, Buy Hand, in 2012. “My background is in tech and communications,” she explains. Her complete lack of retail experience, she believes, may have been helpful. “It’s almost better not to know things,” she says with a laugh. If she had known better perhaps she would have decided not to take the leap. “We haven’t regretted it. It has been great,” she says.

Buy Hand becomes a sister act

The “we” Kavita refers to is she and her sister, Vidya Reddy. Vidya joined Kavita as a partner in Buy Hand after moving to Laguna three and a half years ago. The sisters, originally from Canada, bring very different backgrounds (Vidya’s is in healthcare) and perspectives to their shop. These differences seem to be working out remarkably well for them. The store was voted Retail Store of the Year in 2014 by the Laguna Beach Chamber of Commerce and is rated the number one shopping destination in Laguna by Trip Advisor.

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Sisters Kavita and Vidya Reddy, owners of Buy Hand in Laguna Beach

“Businesses can do good”

 “I always wanted to do something in retail with a social component,” explains Kavita. The store originally featured only American handmade products. Now, the store’s offerings include globally sourced handmade products, in addition to the USA made items. “We believe businesses can do good in the world,” says Vidya. “We were worried about the impact of technology on work so we focused on selling handmade things. Our goal was for our customers to get a cheery, unique gift, but also to know that they are impacting the lives of real people.” 

A new location brings new energy

The sisters moved from their original location to the one they’re currently occupying in February, and they couldn’t be happier. “We are much more part of the community,” says Kavita. “The space has a great energy; it’s very synergistic. It highlights and showcases the things so well and that makes me happy. The pieces have soul. You can feel that here.”

The sisters share a synergistic partnership

The synergy extends to the sisters’ partnership as well. “We’re best friends,” says Vidya of her relationship with Kavita. “We bring two different skill sets to the table. If she digs in her heels I defer and she does the same for me. We respect each other’s talents.” “I don’t think I’d be doing this with anybody else but my sister,” adds Vidya.

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Kavita and Vidya Reddy show off some of their handmade items

They also respect each other’s taste. Kavita says some of her favorite things are the handmade knit kids’ items prominently displayed in the front of the store. “It brings a cheeriness to the store,” says Kavita. Vidya, on the other hand, is passionate about jewelry and gemstones. Coming from an Indian background, Vidya says, “Jewelry is in my blood!” She is particularly passionate about the healing powers of gemstones. “I really want to emphasize that,” she says emphatically. Both sisters make jewelry for the store. “We make a lot of jewelry!” exclaims Vidya. 

Embracing – and being embraced by – the community

Since moving to their new space, the sisters have been wholeheartedly embraced by the community. Neighbors pop in while walking their dogs to say hello. “That’s my favorite thing,” says Vidya enthusiastically. “I love it when your neighbor drops in and says, ‘I heard you had a headache yesterday. How are you doing?’ That’s the community I was looking for.”

A global holiday party with The Peace Exchange

In support of that community, Vidya and Kavita are partnering with Katie Bond, founder of The Peace Exchange, during Art Walk on December 7 for a global holiday party. “Katie walked into the store and we knew we were kindred spirits,” says Kavita.

The party will be at Buy Hand and all proceeds from fair trade sales on the night of the event will go towards the Peace Exchange’s launching of new endeavors in Bolivia. “The party will be about shopping with good food, music, and a…” Vidya pauses as she searches for the word. “A henna artist!” adds Kavita. The sisters both laugh, “We really do finish each other’s sentences,” says Vidya. 

Meditation? Cooking? Look for it in 2018

One of the things the sisters love most about their new space is the charming back patio. Vidya, who studied Ayurveda in India, says she hopes to use it for things like meditation workshops and cooking classes in the coming year. According to Kavita, Vidya is an excellent cook, specializing in southern Indian fare (most Indian restaurants feature northern Indian food). “I like to feed people,” says Vidya. Stop by the global holiday party and who knows? Maybe you’ll get lucky and be able to sample some of Vidya’s cooking.

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Looking for items that tell stories

While the Reddy sisters will be delighted to see you (whatever your motivation to visit the store) their hope is that once there, you find something you like. “People who come into Buy Hand are buying stories. They get to know the process and the inspiration behind every piece,” explains Kavita. Vidaya adds, “We are drawn to things that evoke a feeling.”

Seeing Laguna for all its charms

A resident with her husband since 2010 when they moved from Irvine, Kavita says she was thrilled by the views and the physical beauty of her new hometown, but it took opening her shop for her to fully appreciate Laguna’s subtler charms. 

“When I moved here I didn’t realize how special Laguna was…After being in business for these past years, I can say that it’s a joy to have a shop in this town even if it took me a while to appreciate it.”  

Vidya’s response to Laguna was more immediate. “I fell in love with it the moment I got here,” she says emphatically. Buy Hand reflects the sisters’ commitment to each other, to Laguna and to the artists they represent. “Ours is a purposeful shop,” says Vidya. “A big thank you to Laguna for giving us such a great place to work and live.”


Steve Bramucci, author/traveler/teacher: His favorite adventures are misadventures

Story by DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Steve Bramucci clowns around in front of a combined class of 64 third and fourth graders at Anneliese School, discussing his new children’s book The Danger Gang and the Pirates of Borneo, which was released on August 1 and published by Bloomsbury. 

During a slide show, a picture flashes onto the screen of a five or six-year-old kid wearing a phantom mask and a red cowboy hat. He has the look of a little boy who always has stories on his mind, tales of adventures and pirates and swashbuckling. 

Steve says to the attentive children, “This wasn’t unusual, this is how I dressed for school. I’m wearing a mask, it’s Monday.”

One man in his time plays many parts

Not surprisingly, this boy grew up to be a man who claims, “My favorite adventures are misadventures.” And as a testament to this, his resume has grown considerably since his mask wearing days. A born storyteller, he’s added author, travel and food writer, adventurer, teacher, surfer, husband and soon to be dad to the list. 

Truth be told, he could also add standup comedian and master of accents (British for Jeeves the butler in the book, and pirate-speak) to his qualifications. He’s an expert at both.

Steve keeps the diminutive crowd vacillating between laughter and awe as he tells stories of a confrontation with a flesh-eating Komodo Dragon (“It’s a bad idea to fall asleep on an island of dragons,” he warns), blood-seeking bats (looking for a mosquito meal) that flew into each other over his head as he slept, and how he spent a day with a lioness. He loves exotic animals and endangered species, especially orangutans (a portion of his book sales is donated to saving them). The students hang on his every word. 

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Steve mesmerizes class of third and fourth graders at Anneliese

Standing in front of a class of children isn’t new to Steve. His self-proclaimed, “Favorite school on the planet,” he taught at Anneliese School off and on for 15 years and even lived with Anneliese for six of those, leaving for periods of time to travel and then returning to teach. One of those trips lasted 13 months.

But how he ended up at Anneliese is an experience on its own. 

Steve graduated from UCSD and spent a year teaching in New York, arriving there only three days before Sept 11, 2001. 

On the cross-country-trek back to the West Coast, he bought a VW station wagon and was sleeping in it. He’d always wanted to go to the Sundance Film Festival, so he stopped in Utah. In freezing weather, at 5 a.m. in the morning, he spotted a woman waiting alone in front of a theater. Turns out she was a scout for the NB Film Festival and also the director of the older grades at Anneliese. With no real plan of coming here, he got a job at Anneliese. 

“No matter where you are, life can be an adventure,” Steve says. And he’s living proof of that. “There are always little seeds being planted in your head, and these seeds can be part of the story you tell. The greatest gift a teacher can ever give you is a blank piece of paper.”

And evidently these seeds have been accumulating for some time in Steve’s head, since many have blossomed into elements of his book.

The main character Ronald Zupan is a daring swashbuckler, though he hasn’t really had any faraway expeditions until he sets out for Borneo to rescue his parents. And there are pirates, and orangutans, and mosquitoes. Sound familiar?

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Danger Gang and the Pirates of Borneo

Steve’s parents were both adventurous, but in dissimilar ways. Steve’s life started out in Portland, OR, with a mother (also a teacher) who sometimes wound up getting lost on hikes as she led groups of his nephews and nieces. Perhaps that’s why Steve’s drawn to misadventure. 

While on fishing trips, Steve’s dad would tell him, “Go find whatever you can, and it’ll be your pet.” (Steve’s allergic to cats and dogs). On one search, he wrangled a rough-skinned newt. Unfortunately, its skin gives off toxins. On another occasion, he brought home a pregnant snake whose babies ended up slithering down the stairs, so his mother put the kibosh on his pet adoption phase.

Surfing, jumping off cliffs, and rowing down the Mekong River

Beyond bringing home the random off-beat pet, what Steve loved most while growing up, were comics with pirates who swung on ropes, hopping from crocodile to crocodile, so he translated that into traveling around the world, surfing (his favorite adventure), jumping off cliffs and swinging on ropes (though not from croc to croc). He has rowed down the Mekong River (twice) in a traditional Vietnamese x’ampan, gone into the outback with Aboriginal elders, and spent four months driving a Nissan Patrol in East Africa. 

He says of his excursions, “You never return home the same as you left.”

Then in 2010, Steve won a travel-writing contest at Trazzler with an article about (what else), a pirates’ graveyard in Madagascar. The monetary prize allowed him to concentrate more time on travel and writing. He has written for National Geographic (books), Afar, Outside, OC Register Magazine, and is the founder of the Life section at Uproxx, an online publication with 20 million unique visitors each month. Currently, as his fulltime job, Steve works as the food and travel editor for Uproxx.

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Steve imitates swashbuckler swinging on a rope 

Adventure is stock in trade for his two sisters as well. His older sister is a protection officer for women endangered in war zone areas and lives in Central Africa, and his younger sister is a Glaciologist. 

Now to Steve’s biggest adventure of all, he married Nitka, a fifth-grade teacher he met at Anneliese (the ceremony took place at the school), and their first child is due on Oct 24, a boy. Having globe-trotted extensively, Nitka identifies as a traveler as much as he does. Last year they rowed the backwater of the Mekong Delta, and they’ve been on a road trip, and fished in Alaska.

And on this Wednesday afternoon, it’s Nitka’s class that Steve next visits to discuss his book Danger Gang and the Pirates of Borneo. This audience, besides being a bit older, has just read the book, and the students are ready and willing to ask questions.

An inquisitive audience

One student says, “Why Borneo?” 

Steve responds, “I wanted to have orangutans, and I spend a lot of time in jungles, and I’m proud of how I describe them.”

“Are you happy with how the book turned out in general?” another asks.

“So far, I like it,” Steve says. “I wrote it to please myself.”

And when questioned as to why he wrote it, he explains that he wanted to write books specifically for kids, and one he would have liked to read at eight years old.

In answer to how long it took him to write it, Steve says, “The first 20 pages I wrote in one night and they didn’t change. The rest went through three years of editing and then it took one year for the illustrations and little details. Four years altogether.” He admits that editing is his favorite part of writing. 

Great questions from fifth grade readers.

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Steve Bramucci at home

Steve just returned home from a book launch tour that included Chicago, Wichita, Denver, Portland, Oakland, and San Francisco, sometimes speaking to auditoriums filled with as many 500 children. The appearance at Anneliese is his first in OC. 

He relates one of the most interesting questions while on tour: “Was writing the book hard?”

To which he answered, “It was the most fun difficult thing, and the most difficult fun thing I’ve ever done.”

And Steve likes to amuse himself in the process by adding humorous parts (possibly not evident to everyone). For example, Ronald Zupan says, “At the tender age of five, I crept inside the Zupan Library and devoured my first book, The Collected Plays of William Shakespeare. As my mother, Helen Zupan, once said, ‘The most adventurous people are carnivorous readers.’ She was right, it was a feast of language.”

Later Ronald repeats words from Shakespeare’s plays, as if regurgitating them. 

Shakespeare untamed and a tale of grand adventure

Ronald ends Chapter One with, “The past is prologue. Now, friends, we venture into the vast unknown!” The “what is past is prologue” comes from The Tempest. Later, Ronald worries that his, “Courage isn’t quite screwed to the sticking place.” “Screw your courage to the sticking place,” is a famous line by Lady Macbeth. Steve says there are at least a hundred of these sprinkled throughout the book.

Thankfully, this is not the last readers will see of Ronald Zupan. On October 1 of 2018, the second in a series of four Danger Gang books will be released, Danger Gang and the Island of Feral Beasts, about Fennec foxes. At Christmas, his new book for National Geographic will be released, National Geographic Chapters: Rock Stars, the true stories of extreme climbing adventures. Steve is currently working on The Fixers, the story of a boy and girl who get into terrible situations and try to fix them. 

Danger Gang starts out, “Hello friend, Are you ready for a dazzling tale of grand adventure?” And that it is! But so is the story of its author quite a dazzling tale of grand adventure - and misadventures. And this one is true.

To that five-year-old little boy in the picture whose head was already full of stories, I’d say, “Don’t ever take off that mask, it’s served you well.”


John Gardiner: The poet, performer and perfectionist at the heart of Laguna’s literary life

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

What happens when two language geeks get together at Zinc Cafe on a Thursday afternoon to talk poetry and prose, Shakespeare, the psychedelic sixties, Wallace Stegner’s plagiarism, and more? They swoon over sonnets, argue about punctuation, and get giddy when inventing phrases like “leering moon,” each of them deciding it’s about time the moon be taken to task.

Time spent with John Gardiner – dramatist, teacher, activist, and author of twelve collections of poetry – is like riding a literary tidal wave. At his core, John is a performer, and a perfectionist who has such a love of the written word that it’s hard not to hang on his every one. When John reads his poems aloud, which he loves to do, his voice is a melodic baritone, his language measured and precise, and his enthusiasm infectious. He can’t help himself from stopping every so often to say, “Let me read you another.”

And when he does you can only sit in awed silence, knowing something magical is happening, then and there.

Poetry in motion

“Poetry in an oral art form,” says John. “There’s the page poem and the stage poem. They both have to work.”

John has a voice made for radio and lyrics made for stage. He was trained in opera in an amphitheater in Maine, his tenor rich and deep.

“When you’re on stage you can dance, gyrate, and draw attention to yourself,” he says. “But then it has to work quietly on the page. It can’t be full of sound and fury.”

Making a show of Shakespeare

In addition to performing at local poetry readings, slams and workshops in Laguna Beach for the past two decades, John regularly tours in a music-infused Shakespearian show called “Shakespeare’s Fool.” He teamed up with Jason Feddy. Together they mix rock ’n roll music along with reggae and acoustic based tunes, performing ten songs and ten speeches from the Shakespeare canon.

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John Gardiner reads one of his poems

Shakespeare speaks to John. He has a deep appreciation for not only the language, but the sounds. “Shakespeare invented more than 1,800 words,” John tells me. “Maybe 2,500 words because he invented so many compound nouns.” This was a result of Shakespeare’s desire to avoid obvious rhymes, preferring pleasurable sounds to be subliminal. 

“He put syllable rhymes in the middle of the words, which resulted in a beautiful fluidity,” says John. “Much prettier than consonants and so subtle you’re not aware of it.”

Another technique Shakespeare favored was to use rhythm and meter to drop the endings of words, giving another meaning to the phrase. For example, “To be or not to be. That is the QUEST-ion.” The reader is hardly aware of it but, when read aloud, the emphasis is on the “quest.”

John’s lessons in Shakespeare are so spirited and enthusiastic, I couldn’t help becoming a renewed fan, going home to crack open a volume and re-read a few passages for myself.

From Bard to beards and back again

John took the drug culture of the 1960s seriously. Far more seriously than most Orange County conservatives were willing to give him credit for at the time, finding himself frequently harassed by the police. He was no stranger to hallucinogens. As he writes in his prose poem, “Just Another Strange Night in the 60s” (in which he describes a party in Floriston, Nevada): “Lots of trucks and VW vans out front, mud and ice on the front porch, rock climbing boots, beards, pony tails, granny dresses, patchouli, weed . . . and a bunch of people on varying elevated levels of externally stimulated and chemically altering psychic-cosmic buzzing caps of mind juice.”

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John’s books are available at Laguna Beach Books: He’s working on a third

But, like everything John does, he operated with intention. The drugs were used for a purpose, as opposed to recreation. “Sure, I took large amounts of acid, mescaline, peyote, etc.,” he said in a 2014 interview with the Los Angeles Times, “but I also had one foot firmly planted in the anti-war movement …The last thing in the world I wanted to do was go to the Sunset Strip and jump around elbow to elbow in what can be called a ‘60s acid-head monster mosh pit. That was too much confusion, and I had no interest in it.”

Everything about John is disciplined. He’s neat and particular. His coins are stacked on his desk, his poetry filed in three-ring binders, rewrites of each verse replacing old work, each binder placed chronologically on his shelves. “Writing is discipline,” he tells me. “Never write while you’re stoned.”

The many creative leaves on John’s family tree

John was born in Manhattan Beach in the 1940s. His father had been a fighter pilot in WWII, their relationship not always easy. As he wrote in a poem entitled “Fathers and Sons,” capturing a fictional dream about his father hunting him with a gun, “You missed me daddy-o, so I guess the fight’s still on.”

His parents had six children in less than eight years. John describes them as a “psychedelic Brady Bunch.” The creativity gene has deep roots in John’s family tree. His late brother, Bob Gardiner, was a multi-talented artist, animator, painter and more who won the Oscar for Best Animated Short in 1975 for the Claymation film “Closed Mondays.” Everyone in his family, John says, writes and reads.

He also says it was a matriarchal family, crediting the strength of the women for allowing him to become the male mascot for Laguna Beach’s own Women on Words. “I not only love women,” says John. “I like them.”

Angle of Repose revisited

John’s great-grandmother was Mary Hallock Foote, a renowned 19th and 20th century writer of the American old west. She was a prolific storyteller, writing novels, nonfiction, stories and correspondence. Wallace Stegner’s Angle of Repose, for which he won the 1971 Pulitzer Prize, is based directly upon her personal correspondence. While Stegner gained her family’s permission to use an outline of her life on the promise he would disguise her, he used direct passages of her work without giving credit, an act that has tarnished his reputation in the literary community until today.

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John Gardiner’s constant companion, Maddy

Coyote spirit

John tells me his spirit animal is the coyote, reflected in his 2014 collection “Coyote Blues” and numerous references throughout his work. After spending some time with John, this makes sense. The coyote totem, I learn, is “strikingly paradoxical and hard to categorize.” The coyote’s symbolism is associated with a deep magic of life and creation. He’s a teacher of hidden wisdom with a sense of humor. Perfect for John.

From his poem “Coyote Talk #4”: 

“Two coyotes were greeted the same way we seem to greet

Everything natural, mystical, magical—

Kill it or pave it.

 

With billions of humans, who stands a chance?

Better to rise from this plane and let your wildness roam free.”

There’s long lament in John’s work, a wistfulness for times past and a certain disgust for where things have ended up. His passages echo the sadness of a fading history, the trampling of nature, the risk that technology will subsume creativity, that social media’s ceaseless noise will drown out the quiet beauty of the written word. John is the coyote. The seasoned man of infinite experience and quiet wisdom, standing at the door of a new generation and perhaps wanting to close it. He seems to see ahead to what’s coming for us, and still finds power in the written word, strength in Shakespeare, and beauty in the natural world.

The legacy of language

In looking across the long arc of John’s life, from the generations that came before him, to the brother he lost and the children he never had, there’s a legacy of language, the specific beauty of the creative mind. 

John tells me he regrets never becoming a father. But it strikes me, in poetry, the white space holds just as much meaning as the written word. There’s great power in what’s left unsaid, and beauty in the silence. 

It also seems, in a world weighed down by the burdens of overpopulation, maybe John leaves an even more important legacy behind.

I ask John what his greatest accomplishment has been, his proudest moment. He considers this for a while before saying, “I hope it hasn’t happened yet.” Another nod to the mystical magic of the great unknown.


Lisa Farber: Capturing Laguna’s “Vibe”

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER 

Photos by: Mary Hurlbut

Lisa Farber, the woman behind “Laguna Beach Vibe,” admits her  “plate is pretty full.” And that is just how she likes it. With her publication being entertainment and events driven, there’s always something for her to see and somewhere for her to go in Laguna which means she is out – a lot. As someone of seemingly boundless energy, this seems to suit her just fine.

A Canadian by birth, Farber has embraced her adopted hometown with gusto. “I was traveling throughout the States,” she remembers. A companion needed some company from Colorado to San Clemente. “I wanted to live somewhere where it was warm,” says Farber. Finding San Clemente “too slow” Farber looked at Laguna. “It was much more vibrant,” she says. 

Taking a risk pays off

Farber got her start in publishing at another local publication. She worked there as the editor-in-chief for five years, learning by experience. Then, she says, “I wanted to control my own destiny.” So in 2014 she took a leap of faith and started “Laguna Beach Vibe.” “It was a risk. I went out on my own and I’m glad I did. It feels good to be a woman-owned publication. And competition is good.”

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Lisa Farber, owner of “Laguna Beach Vibe Magazine”

A one-woman show with some great help

Admitting she had a lot to learn, Farber now feels she’s at a place where she can focus on growth – but only up to a point. She is, after all, a self-described “one woman show.” Farber is responsible for the editorial content, the publication’s Instagram account and all of the ad sales. However, she does enlist help in other areas, crediting Jules Johnson with graphic design and Mikal Belicove with her online engagement. “He wrote the book ‘The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Facebook’ so he knows what he’s doing,” she says with a laugh.

Creating an online presence to complement her mission

While “Laguna Beach Vibe” is a printed take-away publication, Farber has also embraced the digital age. “People who didn’t live in town wanted to get the information so now I have this great online calendar. It always gets updated,” she says enthusiastically. (www.lagunabeachvibe.com) While she tries to make sure she covers it all, it’s understandable that every now and then something gets overlooked. When we met she was still smarting over the fact she missed a local skim board contest that was the same weekend as the Brooks Street Classic. “That won’t happen next year,” she says with conviction.

A list of personal favorites

Covering all of the events in Laguna is not easy. For such a small town, there’s a lot going on. Since she rarely misses anything, when asked to list some of her favorites, her answers are definitely worth noting. Grapes for Grads, the Sip and Shuck, Sunset Serenades and Music in the Park, she says, are all favorites. She’s also hoping the Blue Water Music Festival makes a comeback. And KX93.5’s concerts, she says enthusiastically, “You can’t miss them.” All of these things – and more – get covered in “Laguna Beach Vibe.”

The addition of a local legend

Because she is always thinking about how to improve things, Farber added a restaurant review section. Her reviewer is none other than Glori Fickling, a 91-year old critic and a Lagunan since the 50’s who has been a food critic for over 30 years. “She approached me. She has a flair. It’s very Glori,” says Farber of the column, as if she still can’t believe her luck at having such a fabulous contributor.

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Lisa Farber on her favorite mode of travel: a bicycle

Her travel of choice: her Schwinn Panther

Of course, luck has very little to do with any of it. It really comes down to the details, both big and small. One of Farber’s trademarks, besides her trove of colorful visors she frequently wears, is her devotion to old-fashioned customer service. She hand delivers her publication every month. 

“That’s how I make my ‘calls,’” she explains. “If I nurture my customers the deliveries take about a day and a half. Plus I can see what businesses have opened and what has closed. When I get an ad from someone I don’t know…I love that.” An avid cyclist, Faber relishes the days when she can use her Schwinn Panther to make deliveries. “It’s my travel of choice. It’s so easy. I just pull up to the Festival, lock my bike and I don’t have to worry about parking.”

She even does bicycle tours around town

Her dedication to biking extends beyond delivering her magazine. With such limited free time, she nevertheless can be seen leading her own charm house bike tour around Laguna. “It’s only an hour, but we cover lots of points of interest. It was just kind of organic,” she says of how the tour was created. You can find more information about her tour at Laguna Beach Cyclery’s website (www.lagunabeachcyclery.com

Working wherever she is

Farber says she definitely sees herself biking through Europe when she retires. However, at the moment just taking a vacation is tricky. “Vacations are hard,” she admits. “I have to plan, but I work hard so I don’t feel guilty.” This summer she went back to Canada to visit family. It was a vacation, but that doesn’t mean she wasn’t working. “That’s a great thing about this job,” she says noting her ability to do a lot of it from anywhere. On a day-to-day basis, she tries to carve out a little non-work time either ocean swimming or doing yoga in the park. But then it’s back to work.

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Laguna Beach Vibe is a free publication highlighting the happenings in town

Committed to supporting Laguna’s sense of community

Luckily, work is where she loves to spend her time. “What I enjoy doing the most is running my business,” says Farber. “’Vibe’ supports the sense of community that exists in town. A lot of cities don’t have that. That’s why Laguna works so well for what I do,” she says. This feeling of good fortune extends to her hometown, as well. “I don’t take Laguna for granted…yet,” she says with a laugh.


Cory Sparkuhl and friends: visionary filmmakers 

By MAGGI HENRIKSON
Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Did you ever wake up in the middle of the night with an idea that you’re sure could become a movie? …Then with the light of day comes the reality that it’s just not going to happen. 

Cory Sparkuhl is the kind of guy who has had those storied visions – in the middle of the night, in the middle of school, while skateboarding, while looking toward Main Beach from his Laguna office. But he’s one of the rare people who actually make those dreams become reality. When you can share that vision and show it to the world, that’s where the rubber meets the road.

These days Cory is one busy guy, working with his film team at Sparkle Films, sorting out crews and locations. He smiles, “I’ve found my right niche.”

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Cory Sparkuhl (right) with Cyrus Polk (left) and Shannon Belknapp, 

of Sparkle Films

A spark is lit

Laguna is the hometown where Cory grew up with not exactly a plan, but rather a passion for the pursuit of his dreams. His pursuit began from the age of eleven. 

“Riddle Field was my stomping ground with Little League, big cassette tapes, and cameras,” he recalls fondly. 

He started filming in earnest by doing skateboarding videos. That makes a young Laguna lad happy, but the ultimate goal would be to make a little money too. “I thought, if only I could make a living at that, I’d be happy.”

He’s happy now – but it didn’t come easy.

“I used to want to be an actor,” said Cory. “Stage plays, and stuff… But I was better at telling people what to do rather than being told what to do.” He adds, “I love it, directing people and telling them what to do!”

After graduating from LBHS in the not-too-distant year of 2002, Cory went on to pursue his passion at Orange Coast, then to post production school, studying in Burbank the latest in film editing software programs. 

“I learned a lot when I was young, like [editing program] Final Cut Pro, but the industry is about learning something new every day.”

He did some of the inevitable “grunt work” in LA, and then found his way back to Laguna and a position with local renowned filmmakers, McGillivray Freeman Films. “It was exciting,” Cory remembers. But he still needed to augment his income by delivering pizza for Gina’s. Ultimately this go-getter did find his niche.

“Finally I got so busy with production, I started Sparkle.”

A collaborative effort

Sparkle Films is the culmination of passion for the project, knowhow, and joining together with likeminded, hardworking visionaries – who just happen to be good friends.

Cory tells us that the team at Sparkle Films is made up of a group of great minds. There’s Trev Howard, “He’s been my coach, and given me good pointers on business tips.” Trev is the man for storyboarding and script. Then there’s Cory’s longtime friend, Cyrus Polk, who is Sparkle Film’s cinematographer, editor and additional drone operator. Growing up, Cyrus was a skateboarding friend who also had a passion for photography and film. “He’s my right hand man,” says Cory.

 “We’ve been friends for more than a decade,” Cyrus chimes in. “Cory started this when I was in school in Utah. We joined forces, and we love what we’re doing.” In the future, Cyrus plans that they’ll just keep on growing. “We want to keep on entertaining everyone. And take it to the next step!”

“He’s a great asset,” says Cory. “I’ve got a great team. Collaborating goes a long way.”

And then there’s another hometown connection: Shannon Belnapp. Shannon helps Sparkle Films with marketing, social media and accounting. She was also one of Cory’s best buddies in high school. 

“One of my best friends!” he laughs now. “Then randomly we got together later – my whole life has changed!” 

Of course it has – they are now engaged to be married.

Cory smiles, “When you get together with your best friend, it’s the best thing in the world.” 

Truer words were never spoken.

A body of work

A big part of real estate promotions, and a big part of Sparkle Film’s work includes filming with drones, a thorny subject in Laguna Beach. Of course Cory has approached it in a legit way, having received a special certification, which incorporates training, guidance, rules and guidelines. His fiancée got her pilot’s license for remote pilot command, “So she could be my spotter,” he explains. “We need two sets of eyes.” Cyrus also serves as a drone operator.

The offices of Sparkle Films are right in downtown Laguna – jammed with equipment and desks overflowing with projects and production notes. There’s a bed on the floor for their other good buddy, Sheba. “She’s our little mascot,” Cory says with a scratch on the doggie’s ears.

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The crew busy at work at Sparkle Films, while Sheba takes it easy

Sparkle Films has been in business now for seven years. Their projects vary – from several films for the Festival of Arts and Sawdust Festival promotions, to commercials, to real estate corporate videos, and everything in between – from Laguna to LA. They’ve got multiple projects going on at once – generally five to six projects simultaneously.

“Every time we think it’s slowing down, it starts up again,” says Cory, grateful for his growing business. 

Cory’s dad, a long time Festival of Arts artist, originally advised his son to spread his wings into regions more friendly to a burgeoning film career. He said, don’t do it in Laguna, go to LA – but Cory followed his heart. He laughs because now his dad says, “You’re pretty much working in spite of me!”

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Cory filming and Cyrus operating a drone for aerial footage

At the ripe old age of thirty-something, Cory has gained film production wisdom gleaned from many years of experience. “After 3-400 videos your eyes open to a way to produce: a formula for each.” 

It’s a kind of alchemy.

A Festival film release

The latest Sparkle Films project is a follow up to one near and dear to the art heart of Laguna – the Festival of Arts. At first they did a film for the creation of the façade two years ago. The follow-up, just released, is a time lapsed video that covers the Festival ground’s yearlong transformation.

Since Cory’s dad has been a sculpture and painting artist at the FOA for more than 25 years, Cory felt the intimate connection to FOA as part of his roots. “It’s so interesting being a part of the progress and evolution – it is evolving.” 

Sparkle Films used aerial imagery, time lapsed footage, and even cameras mounted on the worker’s bodies, giving an in depth perspective of the whole process. The film encapsulates the immense effort and time required to complete the new and improved Festival grounds.

“It’s history unfolding before your eyes,” as Cory puts it. 

The film is the culmination of many perspectives. “It’s one of the best projects we’ve produced,” said Cory. “I’m so proud of it. It was a year long in the making.”

Without further ado, click here to view the FOA film:

 

https://vimeo.com/224088569

 

The latest Sparkle Films project, one year in the making.

A future in features

Cory likes the storytelling part of filmmaking, and ideally he and the team would like to start making feature movies. 

“I have ideas for scripts for full-length movies we have in mind,” he says. “We hope to produce movie trailers and ways we can pitch to big distributors.”

Filmmaking techniques change rapidly in these times, and Sparkle Films is up for it. Digital is what’s taken it to the next level.

Cory says. “Everything is quicker – but it’s all about the story. Indy films, those are the things I’d like to do.

“Indy films are the best – ones that don’t always get seen. Everything is too fancy now. I like that old school feeling.”

A place that’s home

There’s no place like Laguna for Cory and Sparkle Films. 

“I went to Santa Barbara, to LA, but this is just a magical place,” he says.

He enjoys being in the town he grew up in – running into people he knows. On a bad day he likes to go jump in the ocean. 

“Being by the beach is just good for your soul. It’s home sweet home. Always will be.”

In his free time, and even in not-free time, Cory enjoys the company of his fiancée, Shannon. They are what he calls simple people, “We like movies, we like to go to the beach, go hiking, …go the farmer’s market, do juice.”

Meanwhile, look for him with the crew, often at work around Laguna. They’re busy bringing to the screen those visions the rest of us can only dream about.

For more information about Sparkle Films, with some great footage of Laguna Beach, see their website: https://www.sparklefilms.net/


Gail Duncan: She took a long and winding road to get to The Art Hotel

Story by DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Although it was a long journey in both time and distance, the road Gail Duncan took eventually brought her to Laguna Beach. It’s not a path she would have chosen to take, but she is happy because it led her to The Art Hotel. 

Apparently, it wasn’t the trajectory Gail envisioned for herself as a young woman. She was born and raised in Detroit, MI, and once she graduated from college, imagined her career would be in the field of counseling. She’s passionate about bringing out the best in people and helping them identify what their gifts are (and aren’t). 

But her father, owner of one of the 104 largest Ford dealerships in the country, had different ideas. He wanted her to head the company. And she did, for over 30 years, starting in 1974. Back then, it was a male dominated culture, a difficult one to navigate, says Gail, “Women couldn’t even be members of the Lions Club or Rotary Club.” 

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Gail Duncan, from president of a car dealership to hotel proprietor

As president of the car dealership, she traveled extensively. “My favorite places are Sydney, the South of France, and Laguna,” she says. While staying at the Ritz Carlton during a Ford junket 17 years ago, she discovered Laguna. On a subsequent trip, and with no hotel experience (and having no idea that she would ever be in the business), she acquired the hotel, which at the time was called America’s Best Inn.

For the next eight years, Gail traveled back and forth from Detroit to Laguna. Then in January of 2009, she dropped the hotel franchise and renamed it, “The Art Hotel.”  Gail says, “Being in Laguna, I was surprised no one had chosen that name. The name draws a lot of artists.” And it attracts more than just artists. During the last Playhouse season when King of the Road was playing, the widow and children of Roger Miller stayed at the property. And she has artists from all over the world check in.

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Murals adorn exterior of The Art Hotel

Once on site (Gail lives on the property), she threw herself into redoing the hotel and being of service to the artist community and the city. From her travels, she knew what she wanted in a hotel experience, and she translated that into The Art Hotel. There are no extra fees, guests pay when they check-in and then turn in the keys when they leave. The prices are affordable and there is no charge for pets.  She reserves rooms 101-107 (out of the 28) for furry creatures. Gail says, “I don’t charge for children or pets.” 

Art exhibited in rooms

To assist in the exposure of artists, Gail transformed the sleeping rooms into what could only be described as private galleries, each featuring six pieces of work from an artist, and the artist’s information. “The artists receive 100 percent of the revenue from their work,” she says.

Both inside and out, the atmosphere of the hotel morphed into what it is today. On the hotel’s exterior, individual murals decorate the upstairs balconies (the first one is of Marilyn Monroe), and a long mural is painted on the left and above when entering the parking lot.

However, the most spectacular murals surround the pool. In September of 2014, award winning local artist Randy Morgan (it’s his mural on the Waterman’s Wall on the side of Hobie’s Surf Shop) came to repair one of the existing murals and suggested that was the pool area was the perfect place for another mural, one honoring Laguna’s history. 

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Main Beach Panorama mural by Randy Morgan (Seal Rock on right)

The bronzed stucco mural took more than a year to complete. Main Beach Panorama, which was dedicated in May 2016, depicts the Hotel Laguna, Main Beach lifeguard stand, Greeter Eiler Larsen, and as an homage to Gail’s father, replicas of cars from his collection (one being an Edsel). On the adjoining wall, Morgan later created Seal Rock, which honors the founders of the Pacific Marine Mammal Center. These two murals combine to make Laguna Panorama.

Gail gives back to the community

In her service to others, Gail has devoted no less time and effort to the City of Laguna Beach than to the artistic community. Giving back isn’t new to Gail. She was active in the United Way and the Chamber of Commerce while living in Detroit. 

Shortly after arriving in Laguna, Gail started going to City Council meetings, and eventually became a member of the Housing and Human Services Committee and is now in her third term. She is also on the Development Committee for the Laguna Playhouse. Gail says, “We need people and a village to make us more powerful. You can’t do anything by yourself. Get your mind off yourself and be a blessing to others.”

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The Art Hotel, established in January 2009

In this vein, she’d like to mentor the next generation. “It’s all about legacy. I’d like to teach what I’ve learned at my age to 20-year-olds.”

Currently Gail’s passion is 211 OC, a one-call referral source for free and low cost services county-wide. As a proponent of this resource, she has succeeded in having it added to the Laguna Beach City website under Housing and Human Services.

Evolving atmosphere of The Art Hotel

It’s clear that Gail has changed the atmosphere of The Art Hotel, but in her service to the City of Laguna Beach, she has contributed to its quality as well. And she has more plans for the hotel next year. She’ll be hosting Art Walks and bringing in guest artists.  

When asked if she still travels, Gail says, “I love it here.” But during lulls in business, she travels to visit her two daughters and two grandchildren. 

Gail claims that her passion is finding and encouraging other people’s gifts, but in making the journey from president of a Ford dealership to self-taught proprietor of The Art Hotel, and dedicated servant to the community, it’s evident she has discovered her own gift. 

Gail says, “If you’re going to be here, be of use.” And she is living evidence of her mantra.


Keanu & Zen Mir-Scaer: Writing about riding waves

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

If you want to find Keanu and Zen Mir-Scaer, a good place to look is at the beach. These 10 year-old twins are all about the water: skimboarding, surfing, stand up paddling -- you name it. If it’s in the water, they like doing it. In this way, they’re pretty typical Laguna kids.

A picture book about boarding

What sets them apart from their peers, at least at the ripe old age of ten, is their ambitious undertaking to write and self-publish a book about the sport they love the most: skimboarding.  Titled “Skim Stories: Riding Waves,” this children’s picture book details just what skimboarding is – in rhyme, no less. 

Zen explains that he and his brother were motivated by the questions they got repeatedly from bystanders while skimboarding. “People would always say, ‘Wow! That looks like so much fun. What is it? Surfing…?’ We’d tell them it was skimboarding. This happened so much we decided to write a book about it.” That was two years ago.

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Keanu and Zen Mir-Scaer, ten-year old competitive skimboarders and authors

Tenacity leads to a communal effort

Two years is practically an eternity for kids this age and yet they stuck with it. Their mom, Naz, is clearly a very important factor in this. A guiding force both in and out of the water, she seems to have struck a nice balance between prodding the boys forward and letting them step away from it when they needed a break. The project has grown beyond just the boys and their work, evolving into a truly communal project.

They have a graphic designer (Gabriella Kohr), a videographer (Skyler Wilson), and a photographer (Tyler Brooks) all committed to the project. Laguna residents Blair Conklin, world number one ranked skimboarder, and Paulo Prietto, former world champion skimboarder, have also gotten involved, offering their support and encouragement. Naz says, “To have the number one people in your sport take an interest truly drives a person to do their best.” 

Additionally, Rip Curl in Laguna will be hosting an Art Walk event for the project and the boys’ skimboard sponsor, Exile, has also been supportive of the boys’ efforts. “It became real,” explains Naz. “We didn’t want to let other people down.” 

A successful Kickstarter campaign

As the project became more “real”, Naz and the boys found they needed some extra resources so they started a Kickstarter campaign. Coincidentally, during our interview, they discovered they’d reached their fundraising goal of $2,000. The smiles on Naz and her sons’ faces spoke volumes about how much has gone into this project. 

The money means a lot, says Naz, because even though everyone involved agreed to give their time for free, now they can be paid. She says she and the boys feel really good about being able to compensate them. “It’s just right,” she says. 

Two years of writing and sketching, over and over

No one could have guessed the scope of the project when Zen and Keanu first sat down with this labor of love. It clearly helped that the project became a school project (both boys are home schooled). Nevertheless, it would have been so easy and, frankly, quite understandable if the book ended up being nothing more than a few pages sitting unfinished in a drawer. 

“Our first version was really, really different,” explains Keanu. They would work on it and put it away and then pick it up again when the mood struck. “As they became stronger writers, they’d look at what they did before and go, ‘What?! I wrote this!’” says Naz, while the boys nod in agreement. When asked what was the hardest part of the project both boys unanimously agree that it was both writing and now illustrating the same thing “over and over” until they were satisfied.

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Keanu catches a wave down at Oak St. on the first day of fall

The launch date looms

In the spring of this year, Naz says the writing portion was finally completed.

“Enough is enough. They’re only ten!” she says with a laugh. “We felt we could do the illustrations, but the form was the hardest part. Again, they’re ten so getting things like the shoulder blades and the dimensions right was really a challenge. But the feedback we got was that people liked the way they did it.” 

They’re under the gun to get it all finished so the book can launch before Thanksgiving. Then they can say it’s finally done.

With such looming deadlines, it’s important to note that neither Zen nor Keanu is tied to their chairs furiously fine-tuning their illustrations. The boys are still getting plenty of beach time. They have two skimboard competitions coming up so skim time is essential. 

Skimboarding is not only fun, it’s a good metaphor for life

The boys have been skimboarding for five years. They both remember their first competition well. “I got last in my first heat,” remembers Keanu with a laugh. Naz says she has preached the philosophy of tennis player Rafael Nadal. “He says he doesn’t worry so much about beating the other person, but just trying to be better than himself.” These kinds of lessons are good for all competitors, but especially twins who compete against one another. “I just want them to understand their unique style and focus on being their best as opposed to beating (their) brother.”

“One last good ride” is the family motto

These lessons are paying off. Keanu says after their first competition, “I just wanted to make it to the (medal) stand once.” Both boys have more than succeeded in that goal. More importantly, skimboarding, according to Naz, has taught the boys a very valuable lesson. “It’s not about how many times you fall, because you always fall when you skim. It’s about getting back up and continuing to try. When it’s time to go (home from the beach) we always say ‘One last good ride.’”

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Zen shows his stuff on his first ride of the day

Circumventing “no” is just another lesson learned

The same philosophy of keeping at it not only extends to the creating of the book, but to the publishing of it as well. Publishers and agents, while receptive, were not convinced of the book’s marketability. The boys remained undeterred and self-publishing became the way to get it done. The boys started an Instagram account titled “Skim Stories” to help market their efforts and then, later, their Kickstarter campaign. “Now they’re learning about the whole process,” says Naz enthusiastically.

Shining a light on an “underappreciated sport”

And readers of the book will get a full understanding of what skimboarding really is. “We wanted people to see it’s really people riding waves. It’s an underappreciated sport,” says Naz. The hope is that Keanu and Zen’s book will help change that. If nothing else, Keanu and Zen will have created and shared a lasting work of art they can be proud of. 

“I liked writing the book,” says Zen. “And doing the art was fun.” Keanu adds, summing up the creative process quite succinctly, “I think how easy it is and then also how hard it is to get it right.” The boys are already talking about their next project. “It’s a controversial subject right now,” laughs Naz. 

Whatever the boys decide to do next, one thing is certain: “Skim Stories: Riding Waves” is already a huge success, regardless of how many copies are sold. “This project is such a cool symbol of Laguna Beach. It brings together art and skimming, two things Laguna is really known for. It has all played out so beautifully,” says Naz.


Anneliese Schimmelpfennig, founder of Anneliese Schools: A belief, hard-earned, in things that endure

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photographs by Mary Hurlbut

There are few long-time Laguna residents who haven’t heard of Anneliese Schimmelpfennig. Or, at the very least, heard of her magical Anneliese Schools, which will celebrate their 50th anniversary next year. But her backstory is something most people may not know. She grew up in Germany, under the fog of war, enduring hardships even the strongest adults would find difficult to bear. Her childhood – both heartbreaking and heartwarming – motivates every aspect of her teaching and the philosophy behind her schools.

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Anneliese Schimmelpfennig, a woman with a kind heart after a difficult childhood

Born into a world at war

Anneliese knows what it means to suffer. Two weeks after her birth in 1939, the world went to war. Her father, a German officer in the military, was sent to a Russian gulag in Siberia. He would be gone for twelve years. Some of those years, no one knew if he was dead or alive. 

Her mother in Tussling (Tüßling), a small village in Bavaria near the Austrian border, began taking in refugees. Eleven people moved into their modest home, sharing what little food and space they could find. 

Then, in 1943, Anneliese’s mother made the brave and dangerous decision to harbor three Jewish people (and a cat) in their attic. They stayed for 18 months. “The cat couldn’t even say ‘meow,’” Anneliese says. 

Anneliese brought them whatever food she could – blueberries, oak nuts, apples, potatoes – still not old enough to fully appreciate the risk. When the Americans arrived in 1945, their guests began screaming. “Just screaming,” Anneliese says. “I didn’t understand. But now I know they thought they were caught.”

Growing up in the shadow of the camps

A concentration camp stood nearby in Mühldorf, less than five miles from Anneliese’s small village of Tussling. Mühldorf was a satellite camp of Dachau. As a young girl, Anneliese would steal apples and sneak them under the fence for the prisoners. When caught by the guards, she would act deaf or disoriented. “You had to be very smart,” she says. “It doesn’t help to be an intellectual if you don’t know life.”

 Reading people, and situations, is something she came to rely on very early.

“I saw the people going into the camp. I still remember the sound of the trains that brought them in, all those people looking out at me.” 

Liberated at last

In 1945, the war ended. Anneliese recalls Americans arriving in helicopters, bringing her bubblegum and white bread, delicacies she’d never known. “The Americans were really nice to children,” she says. “Some were only 19 years old, children themselves, and cried when they saw us.” They brought milk powder, and opened the restaurants to give out things to eat. 

“I thought then,” Anneliese says, “I will go to America and teach children to be peaceful. Always talk things out. I’ll teach them not to be nasty and crying and wimpy.”

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Anneliese creates magical and inspiring spaces, a contrast to her own upbringing

Her father’s own fight

At some point, Anneliese’s father escaped and walked his way to the Volga River. He made it, inexplicably, from Siberia to the Black Sea before he was caught, returned to the gulag, and given an additional five-year sentence for his crime. 

Anneliese speculates that the reason he wasn’t shot on the spot was because he had taught himself Russian, and the Russians took note. He would sing and dance for the officers, keeping them entertained. And so, against all odds, they let him live.

“This is why I teach the children so many languages,” Anneliese says. “Even if you only know the basics, and how to say a few things without an accent, it can save your life.” 

Her father’s happiest nights in captivity, he said, were spent in the pigpens. The guards would sometimes throw him in, forcing him to eat with the pigs. Little did they realize he considered this a treat. Pigs were fed potatoes and bits of meat, far better fare than his usual diet of stale bread. 

At night, the Russians drank vodka, ate bread spread with pig fat, got drunk and decided which German they would shoot that night. But he confused them by speaking Russian, and they liked him enough to keep him alive.

Anneliese was twelve the first time she met her father. By the time he came home, he was emotionally and physically spent. He didn’t speak for three days. His feet wrapped only in newspaper, his body starving and skinny. “He taught me to always have hope,” she says. “Even if he had such a sad life, he was never grouchy.”

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Anneliese’s father taught her optimism in the face of adversity

Battle of the books

As a child, Anneliese wasn’t allowed to read. Her mother burned books. She also didn’t allow Anneliese to attend high school, reasoning that school brought no money to the family. Worse yet, imagination and mental escape were dangerous. “Books opened a different world to you, and she didn’t want that,” Anneliese says. The same was true for toys, which also evoked ideas. Practical skills, like mathematics, were the only things of value in a country that had to build itself anew. “I made math problems in the dirt with a stick.”

This austere upbringing shaped the way Anneliese approached teaching, in both the elements she chose to retain and in those she adamantly rejected. “I don’t baby them,” she says. “It’s not good for them.”

 Anneliese considers herself strict with the children. Love, combined with self-discipline, is her governing philosophy. “It’s very hard on me to see children so spoiled here, and not appreciating what they have. They should be happy for every single thing.”

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Anneliese creates the childhood she never had for the children.

An enchanting education

The atmosphere of the Anneliese Schools is magical. And that magic is intentional. Antique furniture and Persian rugs, plenty of plants, art objects and paintings – the spaces look more museum than school. It’s a place out of time, more European than American, free from technology and full of natural beauty. Each campus is nestled in a magical environ around Laguna – the beauty of the beach, the serenity of the canyon, the history of Manzanita Drive.

Anneliese insists on a certain rigor and, within that rigor, she gives the children a lot of room for self-expression. Wooden toys, organic foods, eco-gardening, mud play, an emphasis on multilingualism are all non-negotiable elements of her philosophy. Children are given a wide range of responsibilities, and a deep sense of trust and love.

She also emphasizes etiquette, stressing respect for elders, animals, and each other. And she tries to protect the children from a culture of consumption. “It’s difficult for me here because things get wasted. At restaurants, things get wasted. It’s very hard to see.” This is the reason for the wooden toys. Anneliese believes in things that endure, and rejects buying the latest, greatest gadgets. Simple, basic wooden toys that stimulate a child’s imagination, this is something she believes in.

Around all her properties, you’ll encounter a lot of animals: goats, llamas, pigs, swans, chickens, rabbits, peacocks and a dog named Odie. The animals are both therapeutic and stimulating, and they provide children with another way to communicate with the natural world.

“People always ask when they come from a different school, ‘Is this a hippy school?’” Anneliese laughs. “It’s not. It’s a little freer. Children can make some decisions.” But as you can see, she tells me, she’s not a hippy.

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Anneliese in her Manzanita property with her dog, Odie.

A love (and need) for language

Language is, indeed, an integral part of the Anneliese School’s curriculum. Five native speakers teach Spanish, French, German, Italian and Japanese one day a week. Mathematics is taught primarily in German, as it makes more sense to the students. 

Anneliese speaks three or four languages herself. “English is my worst language,” she says. “It was forbidden in school, the language of the enemy.” It was a language she wouldn’t acquire until she came to the United States at 27 years old.

An optimistic outlook

Anneliese wants to leave her students with a sense of optimism and endurance. Her advice: be independent and take a little risk. “Always be kind and optimistic,” she says. “Negativity destroys you. Don’t ever give up.”

Never has a woman had to practice so much of what she preaches. Anneliese embodies that spirit of optimism and determination. And she will leave that legacy to generations of lucky children.


Leif Hanson and Steve Blue: Friends with a shared cause create the annual Night at The Ranch

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER 

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

It was volleyball that brought friends Leif Hanson and Steve Blue together, way back when they were kids at Thurston Middle School. Hanson arrived from El Morro Elementary, Blue from the since-closed Aliso Elementary. When their paths converged at Thurston, a friendship formed. “When we got to Thurston…well, we’ve just been friends ever since,” says Hanson.

Volleyball sparks a lifelong friendship

The two were teammates at Laguna Beach Volleyball Club and Laguna Beach High School, but as with most high school friendships, upon graduation the time came for them to part ways. Hanson headed off to the University of Hawaii and Blue to Stanford where their volleyball careers continued. 

 

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Leif Hanson, circa 1977 Laguna Beach (submitted photo) and Leif now (this photo by Mary Hurlbut)

Hanson’s volleyball career continued post-college as he played on the pro beach volleyball tour. Blue went a different direction, earning a Master’s degree from Northwestern that had him in Chicago for five years, then the Bay area, before eventually returning to Laguna 12 years ago, where they renewed their friendship. 

Looking for a cause

Surprisingly, that renewal turned out to be a boon for a local non-profit.  Around the time of Blue’s return to Laguna, Hanson says he was feeling compelled to get more connected with his hometown. “I had been looking around to do something. I wanted to get involved and give back,” explains Hanson. With so many great causes, Hanson nevertheless says it wasn’t hard for him to decide where to put his efforts.

Lengthy ties to Laguna and The Boys and Girls Club

“The Boys and Girls Club seemed a natural place. I went there a lot as a kid. It helped keep me off the streets, “ he adds with a laugh. The youngest of five to a single working mother, Hanson says when he was younger the Boys and Girls Club (The Club) provided supervision for him while his mom worked. When he got older, the Club became the place to hone his basketball skills. 

Blue also played basketball at the Club as a kid. Fortuitously, he was also interested in “doing something.” Having put on a large charity event for his company, Blue says he was looking for something more personal.  So when Hanson approached him, it was an easy sell. “I thought it was a great place to give back,” says Blue. “Until I went back and visited I didn’t realize how much the Club does for the kids it serves. It’s amazing,” he says.

Finding inspiration for a very “Laguna” event in Malibu

But what to do? Hanson says the idea for the event came to him when he saw a poster for a Boys and Girls Club event in Malibu. Ziggy Marley was playing at a fundraiser and Hanson thought the casual yet fun vibe would translate well to his hometown. “There they have a lot of celebrities. But in Laguna we know a lot of athletes and people just from growing up here,” he says. Blue jumped on board.

Dinner, music and a totally different vibe from other events

The Boys and Girls Club was enthusiastic about his idea, says Hanson. By the time he approached them it was pretty fleshed out: there would be dinner, “Something a lot more casual than (the Club’s biggest fundraiser held at) the Montage. I’d already discussed doing it with Mark Christy (of The Ranch). I thought we could do something – make it fun, have it be casual and at that beautiful location…all with the live music.”

Thus, Night at the Ranch benefitting the Boys and Girls Club of Laguna Beach was born.

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Photo by Mary Hurlbut

Leif Hanson and Steve Blue prep for their Night at The Ranch event

While totally on board, The Club cautioned they couldn’t really support Hanson and Blue’s event financially. “They told us ‘We will back you but we can’t give you any money.’” Undeterred, Blue says, “We just felt that a lot of locals would like it, the way we liked it.”

The first Night at the Ranch is deemed a success

Pulling from their volleyball roots, the first year of the event they chose to honor Rolf Engen, founder of the Laguna Beach Volleyball Club. “It was very athlete/volleyball centric,” says Hanson. Pato Banton provided the music. “It was a huge success,” says Hanson. The night brought in $70,000.

On year four, the commitment and enthusiasm is still strong

While undertaking such an event once is a big commitment, “once” was never an option for Hansen and Blue. “I did some research before I started this,” explains Hanson. “I talked to some friends who are really knowledgeable about this kind of thing. They counseled me that if I was going to get involved I needed to keep it going.” And he and Blue have. 

This is the event’s fourth year. Hanson says he figured he and Blue would run it for three to five years and then turn it over to someone else to chair. Surprisingly, “We haven’t thought about letting it go,” says Hanson. “It has been really enjoyable.” And beneficial for the Club. Blue says the event is now factored into the Boys and Girls Club annual budget. “We’re second in terms of their fundraising,” he adds proudly.

From $70,000 to $200,000: every year just more success

Through the years the two have incorporated what they’ve learned, streamlining the “business” of the event (it is, after all a fundraiser) to maximize the fun with the idea that people will want to come back. The strategy seems to be working. The event, deemed a huge success when it grossed $70,000, brought in $200,000 last year.  This year’s event, scheduled for Friday, September 22 at The Ranch, could sell out. 

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Photo by Mary Hurlbut

A group of kids enjoy the freedom at The Ranch at Laguna Beach

This year a potential milestone: a sell out

 “Our cap is 400 people,” explains Hanson. “We could be selling out which would be very exciting for us.” The English Beat is headlining. Beyond the dinner and the music, there is also a golf tournament (open to the first 36 players who sign up) for $75 and a post-party with local deejay Laura Buckle. The last day to buy tickets is Wednesday, September 20.

More meaningful than just writing a check, and a lot harder

Both men say they have relied on friends to help make this event the success it is. However, the bulk of the work still definitely falls on them. “The month before it gets difficult,” admits Hanson. “We’re both juggling a lot but we’ve gotten it figured out.” However, both men agree it’s much more rewarding than simply writing a check.

Inspired by gestures, large and small

“The best moment I have had doing this,” remembers Hanson, “is when (Laguna Beach resident) Peter Barker bid on (Laguna Beach local) Dain Blanton’s Olympic jersey. He bought it with the highest bid and then turned around and gave it to Dain’s mom who was in the audience.”

 “The idea is to have an unusual experience that you can’t find anywhere else,” explains Blue about the Night at the Ranch event. But as Hanson’s “best moment” shows, it’s really about people stepping up for other people – something Leif Hanson and Steve Blue have done in a very big way.

(For more information about the event and to purchase tickets, visit www.bgclagunabeach.org.)


Catherine Hall – Her model for retirement is service

Story by DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Just after sitting down with me, Catherine Hall, who is a past president of the Laguna Beach Garden Club, confesses she plants fake succulents to fill in the blank areas in her front yard planter box. A startling revelation from a prior recipient of The Club’s Gardener of the Year. I immediately like her. 

(She later admits, “I’m nothing if not pragmatic and it is the truth. They are mixed in with live plants where real ones simply would not thrive!”)

 “I am not sure what you are interested in, as my ‘life’ is not that interesting!” says Catherine. “I’m a serial volunteer and a ‘Nana.’” But after two and a half hours talking with her, I beg to differ. 

Catherine relocates to Laguna

No need to explain how she ended up in her role as “Nana” to two grandsons, her daughter took care of that. But how Catherine ended up in Laguna in 1996 to begin her life as a “serial volunteer,” was a result of her husband’s work. For two decades, they lived in Leucadia in North San Diego County in what she describes as her “dream house,” and she thought they’d never leave. She made the move on a five-year plan, determined they would go back to Leucadia.

But plans don’t always work out and here they are, twenty-one years later. And now her daughter and two grandsons live close, in Dana Point.

The relocation to Laguna presented an opportunity for a big change. Although at that point in her career, she wasn’t working full time, Catherine gave up consulting. She was in Engineering, and her last project was designing a three-dimensional graphic display system. 

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Catherine Hall, serial volunteer and Nana

So, Catherine and her husband came to Laguna and purchased a fixer-upper here in town. Yet after investing the time and energy into the remodel (which was her job for a while), she discovered, “Not having a work identity didn’t suit me.” 

She started joining things. “I just threw myself at it,” she says. One of her early dips into the volunteering pool was with the Garden Club. “It was the first organization I was committed to, and I decided that was it. I took a master gardening class and became a master gardener, but once I found the Assistance League, I was fully committed to them.” 

Catherine is still a member of the Garden Club. “I never miss the opportunity to volunteer as a docent at our spring garden tour. We meet monthly and our next garden tour is May 4, 2018. A very friendly group (gardeners are just the nicest people) that meets monthly and has lots of activities whether your thumb is green ornot.”

Finding her passion at The Assistance League 

In 1998,she joined the Assistance League, and that again evolved into more thanvolunteering. Although Catherine is no longer in a leadership position, until recently she served as vice-president of philanthropic programs and chair of their Early Intervention Program(EIP), and she is still a member. She was on the board until this past June.

The current president is Carrie Joyce and the current director of the Early Intervention Program is Marilyn Coll, both local ladies. Living in Laguna is not a membership requirement, however.

“I was fully committed to their service programs,” Catherine says. “I especially love the EIP.”

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Volunteer working with mom and twins at Early Intervention Program

In existence since 1976, the EIP of Laguna Beach is a collaborative program with Assistance League of Laguna Beach and the Intervention Center for Early Childhood. It is designed to provide group-based therapy for developmentally delayed infants from birth to one year. 

Catherine says, “We received the Community Partner Spotlight Award in 2017 from the Down Syndrome Association of Orange County. This was an acknowledgment of our long-term commitment to serving the Down Syndrome community through our Early Intervention Program.” 

EIP is just one of the AL’s many programs, as I find out. 

“If there is a need that someone is not addressing, they try to fill that need,” Catherine says. “They do a lot, but quietly.” 

A busy and rewarding time

Since 1975, the Assistance League has been donating funds for Laguna Beach High School scholarships.  Catherine says, “Last year we gave $35K to graduating seniors at LBHS. In 2016 we gave $25K and we gave an additional $10K in 2017.” 

At the LBHS Scholarship Foundation reception for donors in June, Assistance League received the Outstanding Service Award, which Catherine was on hand to help accept the award for.

“Last year was busy,” Catherine says, “and I’m embracing the breaks.” During August, the EIP closes, so it’s given her a breather.

During this lull, she and her husband went to Pebble Beach for the Concours d’Elegance (a gathering of prestigious cars). They go every couple of years. And apparently, you can take the woman away from the “service,” but you can’t take the “service” out of the woman. Catherine volunteered to work at the event to help a friend who is involved in a charity that benefits from the Concours. 

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Catherine designed her beautiful backyard

“The Carmel-By-The-Sea Youth Center provides volunteers for the Pro-Am Golf Tournament and for the Concours. In return, these events donate to the CYC,” Catherine says. “It is a wonderful way to donate some time and enjoy the events. Check out their website for more information. It is also a great model for hosting big events with volunteers. From shuttle drivers to concessions to planning support, many talents are needed.”

Even with so much of her time devoted to service, Catherine manages to have some fun and relax. She and her husband (who is not fully retired) enjoy going to their cabin in Lake Arrowhead, where she likes to kayak on the lake in the early morning hours. In June, they were there to celebrate the end of high school with two nieces and a nephew, who will soon be leaving for college.

Time for summer fun

She especially loves spending time with her daughter and two grandsons, who are four and eleven. The summer included a trip to Disneyland, Legoland, and a visit to Universal Studios (mostly for the Harry Potter attraction, her older grandson just read two of the books, and the trip was his reward), and then to City Walk, where she watched them skydive indoors at I FLY. 

Aside from all the fun she’s having with her grandsons, Catherine says, “My model for retirement is service. I want to make the world a little better in every way I can. We need a lot of that now.” 

Between the volunteering, which doesn’t at all appear to be “serial,” and her role as “Nana” (which requires a substantial amount of service), Catherine’s life doesn’t sound anything like retirement. And it is an impressive model, to say the least.


Kelly Boyd: Part of a remarkable Laguna legacy

WRITTEN BY: Samantha Washer

Photos by: Mary Hurlbut

Mayor Pro Tem Kelly Boyd is a third generation Lagunan. Not many people can claim that. He has been here his whole life, minus a stint in Vietnam. “I was there in ’66 for a year and then came back.” Leaving Laguna was never something he contemplated. “Our family has been here since 1871,” he says simply. “It’s home.”

A commitment to “Laguna Beach of Early Days”

To honor his family’s history, Boyd recently re-published a book that his grandfather, J.S. Thurston, wrote back in 1947, “Laguna Beach of Early Days.” It took Boyd two and a half years to get this labor of love back out in circulation, but he did it. 

“He (J.S. Thurston) was a farmer in his 70’s when he wrote that. Ben Brown’s was his first settlement.” The book, according to a blurb from The History Press, tells of Thurston’s  “personal account of growing up in Laguna and presents an intimate look at the settler’s hardships, relationships and perseverance.” Boyd’s connection to this town is long, and it is also deep.

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City council member Kelly Boyd relaxes at his home in Laguna Beach

Making sure the Marine Room stayed in good hands

He is on the final year of his fourth term serving on the city council (the first term was back in 1978-82) the other three have been consecutive. During his third term in office Boyd was diagnosed with bone cancer. “My oncologist told me, ‘Right now, you don’t really need to worry about things.’” In other words, eliminate what stress you can.

So Boyd, who had owned the Marine Room in downtown Laguna since 1987, decided to sell it in 2012. “I decided it’s time; it’s time to sell. I approached Chris Keller because he’s a local guy. He has had it ever since, and he’s a great guy.” 

As for his city council duties, Boyd stayed on. “I’m sure there were some people who were hoping I’d resign,” he says with a laugh. But Boyd fought through his treatment and is now feeling strong (his cancer is in remission).  

All good things must come to an end, even public service

Nevertheless, when his term ends, he says he’s not running again. “I’ve enjoyed being on the council. Eleven years…it’s at the point of burnout.” He and his wife, Michelle, bought a second home in the desert. Boyd says he’s looking forward to spending more time there, without the need to rush back for a meeting or other city business. 

In 70 years, Laguna has changed…a lot

And while he may seek some well-deserved down time in the desert, rest assured he will come back, even if the Laguna he comes back to is vastly different from the one of his youth. With 70+ years under his belt living in the same place, one can forgive Boyd if he looks back fondly on the good old days and a bit skeptically at the present ones. “I think it (Laguna) has changed a lot and not necessarily in a good way, in my opinion,” he says. 

Changes outside the city greatly impact things inside the city 

The things that irk Boyd are pretty much the things that irk all of us: traffic, high housing prices, empty storefronts. It’s just that while some of us may remember when there was less traffic, Boyd can remember a time when there was no real traffic to speak of. 

Back in the day, Boyd says when he and his brothers needed school clothes, it meant driving all the way to Santa Ana. “There was nothing out there but orange groves.” Over time, the orange groves gave way to tract homes. “What’s really affected the city is everything that’s been built up behind us.” And there is just nothing anyone can do about that.

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Some Boyd/Thurston family history (Boyd as a child, lower, far right)

Longevity can provide a different perspective on the City Council

Sometimes his long history with Laguna puts him at odds with his fellow council members. Take the Marine Life Protection Act, for example. A lifelong waterman (Boyd was the Jr. Surfing Champion 1957), Boyd is not a fan of the city’s fishing ban. 

“My brothers and I were fishermen. They’re taking the little guys like us and hurting us,” he says. The problem, as Boyd sees it, is with the boats hauling the big nets. He was the lone dissenting vote in opposition to the ban. “I’m the only one (on the council) who grew up here and knows the ocean. My problem is once the government takes control of something they never let it go. They’re probably never going to reopen these areas and to me that’s wrong.”

Laguna’s one middle school honors Boyd’s family legacy

But one can forgive Boyd if he at times can sound a bit cranky about the state of things. In his lifetime Laguna has grown from a sleepy art and beach community into a global vacation destination. He remembers when the elementary, middle and high school were all on Park Ave. It’s also worth noting his grandfather donated the land for Thurston Middle School and it was named in honor of his grandmother.

Some of the best parts of Laguna never change

And yet some of his favorite things remain the same. “I love the community. I love what it has stood for: the arts community, the Pageant, the Festival. I was in the Pageant when I was a kid – we all were. That was fun! Everybody was into it.” 

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Boyd and his wife Michelle will celebrate 35 years of marriage this month

A big thumbs up for the city’s management

He is also enthusiastic about how the city is being run. “In my opinion, John (Pietig, City Manager) has put together a great management team; the best I’ve seen in 11 years.” He credits Laura Farinella, Laguna’s Police Chief, for her handling of the protest two weeks ago. Apparently, another one is in the works for September. “I’ve never seen anything like it,” he says about the animus between groups today. “To me, it’s really scary. I don’t think it’s healthy. To quote Rodney King, ‘Why can’t we all just get along?’” he says with a shrug.

Boyd pleased that he’ll be the Mayor when his final term in office ends. “That’s how I want to go out,” he says. “I just hope that in 2018, an election year, Laguna remains civil. The turmoil in Washington DC is drifting to a local level. It’s not good.”

A year to celebrate impressive milestones

Why can’t we all get along, indeed. This a question Boyd will leave for others to solve. “It’s time to let other people, younger people be heard,” he says, As for him,  “I think I’m going to be glad to get out of here,” he says with a smile. He is celebrating 35 years of marriage to his wife, Michelle, this month, yet another thing for which he is grateful.

And that’s not the only celebration he has planned. He’s hosting a 55th class reunion at his house, “For those who can come. There aren’t a lot of us left,” he says with a laugh. 

Boyd’s longevity as a public servant puts him in a very elite group. Laguna is the better for his loyalty and service.


Victoria McGinnis: Living a life of symmetry

WRITTEN BY: Samantha Washer

Photos by: Mary Hurlbut

There is a symmetry to Victoria McGinnis’ life. With two homes and two careers, she seems to like things in pairs. But it goes even further than that. Her two careers, though seemingly different, are actually quite similar, at least the way McGinnis approaches them. She has found her place both on center stage as a performer and behind the scenes as an editor/director/producer. The performing part seems to have been pre-ordained; the other speaks to her resourcefulness.

A performer from the start

As a native New Yorker, McGinnis began performing with her father, a big band drummer and orchestra leader, at the age of three. “It was at the Riverboat Room, a posh supper club in the Empire State Building. He had given me the direction, ‘After you finish singing the song, I will gently squeeze your hand and that is your cue to leave the stage.’  Well, I finished the song, he squeezed my hand, but I made like I didn’t notice. He kept squeezing my hand. I looked up at him and he saw in my eyes the way I felt, how much I loved being there. He then turned to the audience and said, ‘Ladies and gentlemen, we have a bit of a problem, my daughter doesn’t want to get off stage!’ The audience roared! I loved it!” she recalls. The two began regularly performing as a duo when she was 16. 

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Victoria McGinnis, singer, editor, producer, director and Laguna Beach resident

A graduate of Fordham University, McGinnis studied theater. “I was always in front,” she explains. Center stage is someplace she feels very comfortable. Her introduction to the behind-the-scenes world arrived after she graduated.

Being nice wins her a ticket to the mailroom

 McGinnis says she took a job at a production company doing voice-overs. One day she got a strange request. “They asked me, ‘Can you sit in our mailroom and handle the mail?’ The mailroom person had quit.” Not jumping at the chance to sit in the mailroom, McGinnis says she reminded them she was their voice-over person. “Why did you ask me?” she remembers questioning. “They said, ‘Because you’re nice,’” she recalls with a hint of exasperation.

A poor candy selection is a motivator

Once in the mailroom, McGinnis says, “I was bored. They had a bad vending machine, bad candy. So I started researching vending machines.” She says she found machines that were better and cheaper. The office manager was all for it. 

In her enthusiasm for securing better snack food for herself and co-workers, McGinnis says she decided to take charge. “I sent out a global voice mail asking what kind of candy and stuff people wanted in the vending machines. It went to everyone, the head of the company…everyone. I didn’t know I wasn’t supposed do that,” she says ruefully. The office manager was stricken. “She was telling me, ‘You can’t do that! You might get fired.’ I was scared to death!” remembers McGinnis. 

Her quest for better candy pays off

 Later that day, just like in the movies, she saw the head of the company heading her way. This, she assumed, was not going to be good. He approached her, “Are you Victoria in the mailroom?” She says she remembers feeling pretty confident that she was going to be fired on the spot. Instead, she recalls, “He shakes my hand and passes me a slip of paper with a big smile on his face and says, ‘I’ll take M&M’s.’“ After that people started hiring me as a production coordinator,” she says with a laugh.

Editing is an “aha moment”

She didn’t stay a production coordinator for long. An editor at the production company she worked for invited her to watch him edit one of his projects. “It was an ‘aha’ moment. Editing images together is so much like putting two notes together. I couldn’t get enough of it,” she says. In six months after watching and learning, she was hired as an editor. “I was with that company for four years,” she says. She has since added producer and director to her resume, in addition to editor.

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Victoria McGinnis in her element at GG’s Bistro

Victoria’s bicoastal aspirations began in 1997 when McGinnis came to Laguna Beach for the first time after her father passed away. Not only had she lost her father, she had lost the other half of her act. Obviously, it was a very emotional time. A friend, sensing McGinnis’ need to get out of New York, invited her to Laguna Beach.  “New Yorkers think southern California is all just LA,” laughs McGinnis. Her friend convinced her, “’It’s better than LA!’” 

Finding Laguna at the right time

On the drive home from John Wayne Airport, McGinnis says it was nighttime. They drove through the canyon, down Broadway where, ahead of her in the distance, she saw nothing but blackness. Questioning her friend about this strange phenomenon, she was told it was the ocean. “What?!” McGinnis says, recounting her surprise. “I didn’t realize it was right next to the ocean!” If timing is everything, then the timing was right for McGinnis to find Laguna. “It was an amazing week for me to find this town – so lovely, liberal and open.” So she started to seriously consider living here, as well as NYC.

In 2003 she made that a reality and got an apartment in town. She maintained that same apartment until she bought a home here two and a half years ago. She explains she used to divide her time seven months in New York and five months in Laguna. Since the home purchase, however, that ratio has shifted to favor more time in Laguna.  Her partner, Tori Johnston, is a 20-year Laguna resident originally from Scotland. “She had four daughters when I met her so now together we have four daughters. All Laguna Beach girls,” says McGinnis proudly.  

Putting down roots in Laguna inspires a desire to get involved

Since becoming a homeowner, McGinnis says a newfound desire to get more involved in the community promoted her and Johnston to become Board members of Chhahari, a local non-profit that runs an orphanage in Nepal. To hear McGinnis talk about the kids who reside there, whom she hasn’t met personally and only knows through the videos she edits from other people’s footage, is to hear a woman passionate about this cause. “I feel like I need to meet them,” she says emphatically. She and Johnston are looking to do just that in 2019. McGinnis proudly tells me their eldest daughter has already been there.

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Victoria McGinnis is an exceptional multi-tasker, singing and playing percussion

Laguna is becoming her own personal musical

For now, McGinnis is more than content to perform her standing Wednesday night gig at GG’s Bistro in addition to performing regularly at the Sawdust Festival, and other gigs around the southland. “I’ve been at the Sawdust a lot and I love it! There is such anonymity in New York. It can be very lonely. Here, in Laguna, it’s amazing for me. So many people walk by and wave. And at GG’s, with the great locals…There are nights where everybody’s singing ‘You Make Me Feel So Young’…It’s how I’ve wanted to live my life. You walk down the street and everybody’s singing.”

A father’s words ring true

Apparently, her father, who never visited the west coast, was right when he told her, “Dolly, (he called her Dolly) you belong in southern California. You love the sunshine. That’s where you should be.” And while she is by no means relinquishing her New York ties, she says now home is where her house and family are. “I feel like I’m finally a local. I feel like I’m really settling, really enjoying things.”


CNN selected Ryan Hickman, featured in August 15 edition, as one of their five Young Wonders—“youth making a positive impact on their communities.” Congratulations from all of us at Stu News Laguna, Ryan!

Kid Crusader:

Eight-year-old Ryan Hickman’s Trash for Cash campaign benefits PMMC to the tune of thousands

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Eight-year old Ryan Hickman entered the world wanting to make it better. From the time he was tiny, he was obsessed with trash – collecting it, sorting it, recycling it, and using large portions of his proceeds to give back. His cause of choice is the Pacific Marine Mammal Center (PMMC). In just over a year, he’s donated nearly $5,000 for the care and treatment of the seals, sea lions and elephant seals rescued by the PMMC.

“Ryan’s enthusiasm and commitment to recycling is remarkable,” says Michele Hunter, the Director of Animal Care at PMMC. “He’s like a star. Every time he comes in, we all start shouting, ‘Ryan’s here! Ryan’s here!’”

At age three, Ryan accompanied his dad to the local recycling center to cash in some bottles and cans. That trip transformed his short life. The next day, he announced his plan to distribute bags to friends, family and neighbors, encouraging them to save their recyclables for him. Little did he know where it would lead.

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Ryan is passionate about recycling – and sea lions – luckily for PMMC

Ryan’s passion became infectious. He soon had everyone he knew – and many he didn’t yet know – contributing to his cause. Neighbors told their co-workers, teachers told their friends. Now Ryan has clients all over Orange County. He makes the rounds each week, collecting cans and bottles from businesses. He sorts, cleans, crushes, and packs them to make those regular trips to the recycling center. 

“There’s never a day when he doesn’t want to recycle,” says his mother, Andrea Hickman. “Even in the pouring rain.”

“Except holidays,” Ryan says. “I need to take holidays off.”

All that collecting has translated to more than 251,000 cans and bottles, or 56,000 pounds of recycling. Recently he broke his own record for a single trip to the center, earning a whopping $542. It pays to recycle.

Student as teacher

“Before I met Ryan,” says Andrea, “I didn’t know anything about recycling. Now we just installed solar panels in our home. That’s all because of what Ryan has taught me.” 

Ryan recognized all that trash was ending up in our ocean, threatening the environment and endangering the marine life. And if there’s one thing Ryan loves next to garbage trucks and recycling, it’s animals. So he’s taken his message across the globe, encouraging kids just like him to protect the planet, letting them know – no matter how young or how small – they can make a difference.

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“Whenever he comes in, we all start chanting “Ryan’s here! Ryan’s here!’”

Ryan receives letters, messages and phone calls from around the world. He recently Skyped with students in Bali. They asked him all kinds of questions about recycling—how and where and why—curious about his passion. 

When Ryan and his family visited Belize earlier this year, he was recognized by the locals. A celebrity was in their midst. He was struck by how far Belize has to go in their trash collecting efforts. “If we spent a month there, just cleaning their streets,” says Andrea, “We could have made a real difference.”

So in addition to the money he makes from recycling, he began offering “Ryan’s Recycling” t-shirts for $13. All profits go straight to the PMMC, which he visits every chance he gets (and takes care of his bins, collecting their recycling while he’s there).

“Ryan’s story shows that a little kindness goes a long way,” says Hunter. “You can make a real difference in the world at a very young age.”

We are the world

Above Ryan’s bed hangs a map of the world, filled with colorful pushpins. Every pin represents a place in the world that’s contacted Ryan for a t-shirt. There’s a special breakout map of the United States in the upper corner because there are too many pins for the size of the map. “We’re big in Asia,” says Andrea. “And Europe.” The map bears that out. Europe and Asia are indeed running out of room. 

Kenya, Ethiopia, Vietnam, Australia, Pakistan – they’ve all heard about Ryan and his recycling crusade. There’s even one pin stuck in the center of the Pacific Ocean. It’s from a ship stationed out there, whose crew found Ryan and ordered his t-shirts, so he packed them up and shipped them off to the middle of the ocean. 

The map is not only a great lesson in world geography, it’s also a wonderful way to connect Ryan to the planet he’s trying – bottle by bottle – to save. 

As we talk in the living room, Andrea tells me they just got a video from Dubai.

“Where’s Dubai?” asks Ryan.

“In the middle east,” she tells him. “Near Saudi Arabia.”

Not content with his mother’s lack of specificity, Ryan runs to his room to look at his map. “I gotta know,” he says. “How do you spell it?” He returns to announce that Dubai is in the United Arab Emirates, and confirms there’s a pushpin to mark the spot.

Every pin means more money for the marine mammals at the PMMC. Ryan’s t-shirts translate to food, electricity, medicine and water. “All the things it takes to run the center and care for the animals,” says Hunter. To put it in perspective, he’s donated more than 10,000 pounds of fish to feed the mammals.

Ryan’s recycling goes viral

Sometime in 2016, Ryan’s story went viral. Ellen DeGeneres heard about Ryan and invited him on her show, donating $10,000 to his cause, along with a Ryan-sized trash truck he drives around his cul-de-sac collecting cans. (He’s a remarkably adept driver, and can parallel park better than most adults I know.)

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No job is too big or too small for Ryan’s recycling

He also received a new Dell laptop from Adrian Grenier, which happened to coincide with his birthday in July. Now he can keep track of his business.

Ryan has been profiled by hundreds of web sites, newspapers, and television and radio shows around the world, including CNN, Ryan Seacrest, Bill Handel, PBS, Good Morning America, and ABC World News. He’s had shout outs from Chelsea Clinton, George Takei, and Fabien Cousteau. Congressman Darrell Issa recently visited Ryan in his home. And the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Mayor and City Council of San Juan Capistrano all presented him with awards. 

Next month, the PMMC is honoring Ryan at a gala event for his contributions. “I bought a special shirt with whales on it,” he tells me.

Saving for the future

“Ryan is a saver,” says Andrea. “He doesn’t want to spend a single penny when it can be saved.” Every aluminum can earns him a nickel. Bottles are more. But, he warns, be careful about wine bottles. The recycling centers have too many and they take up too much room, so you’re not going to get as much for them.

How much has he managed to save in his short life? More than $25,000. That’s quite a college fund. “No,” he tells me. “I’m saving to buy a trash truck.” The one he covets is $120,000. Save he must. But he’s well on his way. 

“We’ll talk about that,” says Andrea, winking over at me. “I don’t know what the HOA will say.” 

A head for trash

Even without the real thing, Ryan has a good start with an impressive collection of 18 toy trash trucks around the house. They’re stacked in his closet. He rolls them across the living room floor. “He was just born loving trash trucks,” Andrea says. “All the local drivers know Ryan. They’ll pretend to pick up the wrong can and Ryan goes wild, yelling at them to stop. It’s really cute.”

Ryan also supervises Mr. Jose, the custodian at his school. “He calls me his boss,” says Ryan. “I help him clean the campus, and I get to ride in his golf cart.”

His business has earned him entry into the CarbonLITE and RePlanet Processing facilities tours. There he’s learned how recycling really happens, from start to finish. The process is overwhelming and impressive. His website tells the tale through photos and videos.

What else does he love? SpongeBob, fidget spinners, math (“I like counting money!”), and frogs. Ryan’s room is filled with frogs. Stuffed, plastic, figurines, rugs, sheets, pictures and pajamas. None of them living pets, at least that I noticed. But they represent his favorite color—green.

Planning ahead

I ask Ryan what he wants to do when he’s older. 

“Run your own company?” offers his mom. 

“Drive a trash truck,” he tells her. 

“How about owning the trash company?” she says. 

He looks at her. Apparently there’s more to talk about. But they have time.

In the meantime, Ryan’s entrepreneurial spirit is saving the lives of countless marine mammals here in Laguna Beach. The little man has a plan, and it’s paying big dividends for both our town and our planet.

Kermit the Frog used to lament, “It’s not easy being green.” Not only is it easy it’s fun – and profitable.

To read more about Ryan’s story, purchase a t-shirt, or donate your recyclables to his cause, visit Ryan’s website at www.ryansrecycling.com.


Jason Allemann, new principal of LBHS, can’t wait for the 2017/18 school year to kick off 

Story by LYNETTE BRASFIELD

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

New principal of Laguna Beach High School Jason Allemann plans to participate in classroom and athletic activities, roam the campus at recess, and generally be a visible presence during as well as before and after the school day. 

Yes, he’s dedicated to developing long-term strategies to improve communications between and among school staff, teachers and parents and the Laguna Beach community. 

Yes, he wants to encourage a positive and non-discriminatory attitude on campus and to celebrate academic and athletic achievements. 

Yes, he knows that time spent on administrative tasks is vital in the smooth running of an educational institution. 

But Allemann is not going to be confined to his office while working on those aspects of his job.

“Does a football coach leave the field when the game begins?” he asked rhetorically as we sit in his office discussing the challenges inherent in heading up a high school in these turbulent, social-media-dominated and sometimes, sadly, drug-addled times. 

“No. He’s on the field, encouraging players, cheering them on, checking for problem areas, devising solutions, seeing what’s going on in real time,” he said. “That’s what I’m talking about.”

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Jason Allemann in his element on the LBHS school campus

Sports analogies come naturally to Allemann, who grew up in Dana Point and most recently was principal of Dana Hills High. He and his family have always been active in athletics, and he counts himself lucky that his three kids are each interested in different sports: daughter Avery, 15, loves volleyball; Caroline 12, enjoys tennis; and son James, also 12, is an avid footballer – Allemann coaches his team – and the entire family, including wife Kristin, a special-ed teacher, enjoy a range of ocean sports.

But it is education that is Allemann’s true passion, though he admits he didn’t spend his youth dreaming about becoming a high school principal.

“Kids don’t, do they?” he said. “It’s not exactly a glamorous job. They dream about becoming police officers or fire fighters or maybe rock stars. But no, it was a winding road that brought me to this place.”

Before I followed up on Allemann’s winding path, I asked him if, as a kid, he had indeed nurtured a passion for a particular career.

Allemann, who has a breezy charm, and whose optimism about the world – not to mention his new job – is quite contagious, turned serious.

“For a while as a kid, I wanted to be a doctor. But people said to me, why would you want to do that? That takes so much work. It takes forever to finish your education. And partly for those reasons I didn’t pursue that.” 

Allemann rolled his Fidget Cube – a gag gift meant to acknowledge his restless desire to be on top of every aspect of his job – between his finger and thumb. “It’s my hope that every student in this high school is encouraged to pursue whatever his or her dreams are, no matter how challenging.”

Yet, he assured me, his enthusiasm palpable, “Doesn’t mean that I wish I had become a doctor. I love what I’m doing now. I’m thrilled with this job and I’m especially excited to be in Laguna. I’m looking forward to understanding the culture here more deeply and becoming involved with the community on every level.”

Jason Allemann

Allemann graduated with a major in Psychology from San Diego State University. Later he would go on to earn his Masters in Social Work at Cal State Long Beach, then a PhD in Educational Leadership at USC.

So, the winding road: “My senior year project at San Diego State addressed issues related to after-school care in the Mira Mesa area. I saw how parents arrived to pick up their elementary school kids, worn out after an exhausting day at work. 

“I talked to a few dads and they told me how much they would love to be able to just spend time kicking a ball around with their kids once they got home, but instead they had to oversee homework,” he said. “They had to take on the role of taskmaster instead of being able to just have fun with their family.”

In response, Allemann devised an afterschool program that incorporated supervised homework and other seemingly minor but important changes that came about after discussing issues particular to working parents. He then approached other afterschool programs and helped them introduce similar programs.

“The parents were super happy,” he says. “That project, this job – it’s all about talking, and mostly listening, and being willing to try something new. Communicating with everyone involved.” 

Which is exactly the approach he plans to bring to his new role at LBHS. “I love the intimacy of this community,” he added. “I can’t wait to get to know more about Laguna and get involved.”

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Jason Allemann is Southern California born and bred

After graduating from SDSU, Allemann worked to help developmentally disabled adults with living skills. 

“We’d teach them how to handle basic but important tasks such as creating a grocery list, shopping at a store – what goes in the refrigerator and what doesn’t, for example, as simple as that,” he explained. “Our goal was to help them live independent lives. It was very rewarding to feel we were making a difference. It reinforced that small changes can have a huge impact.”

Later in his career, Allemann was employed as a school counselor helping kids with severe emotional diagnoses. Then counseling evolved into a job with administration and from there to becoming an assistant principal. 

Allemann served as principal at Katella High School in Anaheim for four years and most recently spent six years as the principal of Dana Hills High.

How transparent does he plan to be about the challenges that LBHS, like all high schools, face?

Allemann shrugged, clearly unfazed. “I see problems as learning opportunities,” he said. “I’m not going to be shy about addressing issues publicly and engaging the community in finding solutions, whether it’s racism or unintended discrimination or any other matter. There are problems in every industry. I’m lucky to have a range of resources at my fingertips.”

He paused a moment and then said, “You know, it’s a luxury to have this job, to work with kids. You never stop learning.”

At this point in the interview, the Fidget Cube was getting a workout. I could tell that Jason Allemann was ready to return to his computer to check his emails and get going on projects much more rewarding than talking about himself. 

Clearly, for him it was nearly game time and his inner coach was raring to get going.

I have a feeling that his energy, enthusiasm and insights are going to bring a whole new dimension to a high school that is already one of the finest in the country.

Tuesday September 5 the school year kicks off, and Jason Allemann is ready to roll.

Shaena Stabler is the Owner, Publisher & Editor.

Lynette Brasfield is our Features Editor.

Dianne Russell is our Associate Editor.

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Alexis Amaradio, Barbara Diamond, Cameron Gillespie, Dennis McTighe, Diane Armitage, Laura Buckle, Marrie Stone, Samantha Washer and Suzie Harrison are staff writers and/or columnists.

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