Subscribe | Advertise

Volume 16, Issue 58  |  July 19, 2024

TOP HEADLINES THIS ISSUE

TOP STORIES THIS MONTH

LBHS Boys Basketball to host “Battle at the Beach” tourney this weekend, featuring some of SoCal’s best teams

All games will be held in Dugger Gym; the daily cost of entry is $10, with a three-day discounted pass for $25. There will be delicious breakfast burritos and lunch taco meals offered each day along with homemade sweet treats baked up by our team’s parents. All proceeds raised will go to support the LBHS’ Boys Basketball team…

Remembering Dr. Elisabeth Brown, a visionary in Orange County land conservation

Elisabeth “Liz” Brown, Ph.D., biologist and inspirational Orange County advocate for open space and wildlife habitat protection, died peacefully on July 6 at the age of 81. Serving as president of Laguna Greenbelt, Inc. from 1985 through 2019, she played invaluable roles in collaborative efforts and legal battles protecting wilderness around Laguna Beach…

TOP STORIES THIS MONTH

Laguna Life & People – Artist Rowan Foley pushes herself to be more vulnerable

Classically trained, and a second year Festival of Arts exhibitor, Rowan Foley admits she’s in a constant level of creative exploration, “I’m always pushing myself to be vulnerable, that’s the aspect of art that draws me in.” Oil painting, drawing in both pastels and charcoal, and sculpture are her fortes…

Laguna Life & People: Tex Haines and the evolution of Victoria Skimboards

In 1980, Victoria Skimboards introduced the very first foam core skimboard that was covered in fiberglass and resin. Victoria Skimboards and The Vic competition, which is the oldest and most prestigious contest of its kind in the world, put skimboarding on the map and made the shop a hub for information about the sport…




SLIDE-1
SLIDE-2
SLIDE-3
SLIDE-4
SLIDE-5

Fair Game

By TOM JOHNSON

Bball highlights summer fundraiser/tournament in Dugger Gym with SoCal’s best local teams

There’s some outstanding hoop action up in Dugger Gym today through Sunday. Yup, right smack in the middle of summer.

The Laguna Beach High School’s Boys Basketball team is partnering with Laguna Beach High School’s Athletic Boosters to host a summer tournament, starting today (Friday) at 9 a.m. and running through Sunday at 5 p.m.

The tournament is called the “Battle at the Beach” with high-profile boys basketball varsity teams participating from various SoCal high schools, including Sage Hill in Newport Coast, Corona del Mar, San Pedro, El Toro, San Juan Hills, Beckman in Tustin, Dana Hills, University in Irvine and Edison in Huntington Beach.

LBHS games are today at 9 a.m. against San Pedro, 1 p.m. against San Juan Hills, Saturday at 10 a.m. versus Sage Hill, 7 p.m. against Edison and then Sunday at 9 a.m. against Corona del Mar.

There will be delicious breakfast burritos and lunch taco meals offered each day along with homemade sweet treats baked up by our team’s parents.

All games will be held in Dugger Gym and the daily cost of entry is $10, with a three-day discounted pass for $25. All proceeds raised from the tournament will go to support Laguna Beach High School’s Boys Basketball Team, led by head coach Rus Soobzokov.

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

Laguna Beach Boys Basketball Team readies for “Battle at the Beach” starting today

• • •

The OC Fair, utilizing this year’s theme “Always a Good Time,” opens today (July 19) and runs through Sunday, Aug. 18. As one might imagine, there’s lots to do and see, and kind of a must on the Summer “To Do” list.

The entertainment acts are plenty. The Toyota Summer Concert Series in the Pacific Amphitheatre includes the Stray Cats (August 1 and 2), The Fab Four (August 3), Rick Springfield and Richard Marx (August 15), Alice Cooper (August 16), Trevor Noah (August 18) and a number of others.

Check out the entire line-up here.

Next door to the Pacific Amphitheatre in The Hangar will be a tribute band experience to fit just about everyone’s list of favorites, including bands with tributes to The Talking Heads, U2, Phil Collins, Van Halen, Bruno Mars, Elton John, Boston, the Doobie Brothers, No Doubt, Michael Jackson, the Eagles, Led Zeppelin and more.

You may buy tickets here for all of them.

There will also be demolition derbies, a craft beer roundup, monster trucks, the carnival, rides and don’t forget the exhibition halls that are always good for browsing…and cooling off.

So, grab yourself a corndog, maybe visit Chicken Charlie’s, have yourself a snow cone or other delight and enjoy the Fair.

It’s open Wednesdays through Sundays; $13 general admission on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and $15 Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Seniors 60 + and kids 6-12 are $9.

The Fair does limit daily attendance to make the experience more enjoyable, so you should purchase tickets before you just head out there. You can do that by going to https://ocfair.com/oc-fair/admission.

• • •

Speaking of the Fair, the Laguna Ocean Foundation will be showcased in one of OC Fair’s exhibits this year. OC Sand & Sea will offer an opportunity to learn about the Orange County coast, including the amazing tidepools, as visitors explore the OC Sand & Sea exhibit.

Guests can also discover iconic beachside landmarks, wander through culinary entries, explore a touch tank and take a deep dive into virtual reality.

Make sure you check it out.

• • •

Speaking of the Fair, OC Supervisor Katrina Foley will welcome guests today at the opening, and join in on the flag raising ceremony from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

“This summer, it’s ‘Always a Good Time’ at the OC Fair.’ Every year, I love annual traditions of raising the American flag on opening day to kicking off a summer of music, dancing, rides, crazy food selections, exhibits, animals and great family fun. Casey (husband) and I especially enjoy dancing with all of our neighbors in front of the hangar and visiting the table setting exhibitions,” said Supervisor Foley.

• • •

Under the “Did you know category:” Did you know that Orange County’s first Fair was in 1890 and primarily showcased livestock and horse races. Since then, the OC Fair has grown from a small, three-day celebration to a 23-day festival.

• • •

Did you know that Laguna Ocean Foundation Biologists and Tidewater Docents are busy this summer offering education at the tidepools? In fact, they interacted with more than 5,500 visitors in June alone at the tidepools.

They can often be found during low tide at Treasure Island, Heisler Park and Crescent Bay North.

The docents educate the proper way to explore these ecosystems with harming the natural resources within the Laguna Beach Marine Reserve and Conservation Areas.

• • •

The local candidate filing season opened this past Monday (July 15). In checking with City Clerk Ann Marie McKay, no new filings have taken place.

So, at this point we have Judie Mancuso and Hallie Jones announced for the two available seats, while waiting on incumbents Bob Whalen and George Weiss for their decisions.

• • •

Check out the Fair Game Laguna Beach weekly podcast with Mayor Sue Kempf and myself discussing issues of our city.

• • •

Laguna Beach Fire Department is holding an Open House at the headquarters on Wednesday, July 24 from 4-6 p.m. at the Laguna Beach Community and Recreation Center, 30516 S. Coast Highway. This event will feature fire safety measures, educational tables, the Laguna Beach goats, an opportunity to meet our new City Manager Dave Kiff and an opportunity to chat with fire personnel. They invite everyone to come, enjoy some light bites and refreshments, and learn about fire safety, CERT and emergency preparedness.

• • •

Laguna Live! sent out a “Summer Greeting” this week wishing the community an enjoyable summer. Contained in the messaging included a request to receive input for their monthly music (Laguna Live! at the Museum), the singer program (Beth’s Tuesdays) and their kids programming (Live! Music Matters).

They are seeking suggestions or favorite musicians from past concerts related to who you’d enjoy seeing and listening to.

Send your thoughts to info@lagunabeachlive.org.

Open story in new window…



Remembering Dr. Elisabeth Brown, a visionary in Orange County land conservation

Elisabeth “Liz” Brown, Ph.D., biologist and inspirational Orange County advocate for open space and wildlife habitat protection, died peacefully on July 6 at the age of 81. A beloved figure in the Southern California environmental community, she served as president of Laguna Greenbelt, Inc. from 1985 through 2019. During that time, she played invaluable roles in collaborative efforts and legal battles protecting wilderness around Laguna Beach, establishing organizations to manage those lands, and creating programs for public access.

Click on photo for a larger image

Submitted photo

Dr. Elisabeth “Liz” Brown

Dr. Brown was part of an Orange County environmental movement that created the South Coast Wilderness, 22,000 acres of contiguous open space within the cities of Aliso Viejo, Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Woods, Newport Beach and unincorporated Orange County. Her passion for protecting Southern California ecology and her ability to help craft complex conservation agreements led to remarkable achievements. When she was reminded of her accomplishments, she was quick to point out, “I didn’t do it alone.”

“Elisabeth embodied the environmental movement that we all wanted to be a part of where science was earned and understood, the political will align, the team making it happen knew what to do and the funding was found. Her wit, savvy, intuitive approach and positive attitude were skills we all wanted to have so we could be as effective as she was. She was a beloved mentor,” said Melanie Schlotterbeck, Southland head for Power in Nature.

Dr. Brown was a key player in the historic fight to protect Laguna Canyon, representing the Laguna Greenbelt, Inc. in months of negotiations with the Irvine Company. Public opposition, including the “Walk to Save Laguna Canyon” in 1989, led the Irvine Company to abandon plans for their Laguna Laurel development and sell the land to the city of Laguna Beach. A historic agreement was made to preserve the land which became the heart of the Laguna Coast Wilderness Park. Dr. Brown remained involved throughout the years-long process of land purchase, fundraising, management planning and park creation.

During this exciting time, Dr. Brown worked with many others to craft agreements and establish organizations for the long-term protection and management of the coastal open space.

“The idea of bringing all the Laguna Greenbelt lands under common management has been my most important goal short of the preservation of the land itself,” Brown wrote. A cooperative oversight body, Coastal Greenbelt Authority, was created to ensure that the acquired land would remain “wild.” The Authority continues this oversight today, with members representing the park’s landowners, local environmental organizations, Laguna Canyon homeowners and cities adjacent to the parkland.

“Following Liz’s lead I was inspired; she was my mentor, my friend and my source of knowledge about our unique coastal canyons. Her commitment, wisdom and that special smile will always be remembered,” said Mary Fegraus, founding executive director of the Laguna Canyon Foundation and chair of the Coastal Greenbelt Authority.

Dr. Brown also worked to incorporate the coastal open space into an innovative regional conservation effort that was one of California’s first examples of a Natural Community Conservation Plan (NCCP) and Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP). Dr. Brown served on the board of the organization that formed around this Orange County agreement, now called the Natural Communities Coalition.

In the last two decades, Dr. Brown turned her focus to making the Irvine-Laguna Wildlife Corridor a reality. She became increasingly concerned about the need to connect the coastal open space to a larger wilderness area. Without a wildlife corridor, some species in the protected coastal “island” are showing signs of inbreeding. The Irvine-Laguna Wildlife Corridor will provide a pathway for animals to move between the 22,000 acres of south Orange County open space and the Cleveland National Forest. A key portion of the Corridor is under construction in Irvine with an expected opening in 2025. With a sense of urgency that Dr. Brown helped to inspire, Laguna Greenbelt, Inc. is working to complete the corridor by addressing remaining challenges, including safe passage through the I-5/I-405 freeway complex.

“Liz was an excellent leader, a mixture of steadfast determination in achieving her goals mixed with a pragmatic understanding of what can be achieved,” said Norm Grossman, president of the Laguna Greenbelt, Inc.

Dr. Brown was born in 1943 in New York City to a French immigrant mother Marthe-Hermance Malartre, who was educated in journalism at the Sorbonne and loved the outdoors, and her father, Karl Paley Cohen, who came from a family of Brooklyn Jews, earning a Ph.D. in chemistry. Making important contributions to the Manhattan Project, he became a nuclear energy pioneer. Dr. Brown earned a Master’s Degree in Zoology from UC Berkeley, where she was advised that women did not need higher degrees, and went on to earn a Ph.D. in Biology from UC Irvine in 1976.

She settled in a home in Laguna Canyon in the 1970s with her husband Dr. Allen Brown, where they raised their daughter, Mina.  Dr. Brown became fascinated by the local wildlife and landscapes and soon joined the movement to assemble a “greenbelt” of protected open space around Laguna Beach. She explained later that she got involved because she wanted to teach people about the ecology of Laguna Canyon – but realized that if she didn’t help to protect it, there would be nothing left to teach them about. Becoming board president of the Laguna Greenbelt, Inc. in 1985, she treated her position as a full-time job and seemed to have limitless energy for it.

Passionate about helping the public to appreciate and understand local ecology, Dr. Brown created trail and field guides, wrote a regular column for Laguna Beach newspapers, and ran a naturalist training class that gave more than 600 people the knowledge to lead tours and educate others about local natural history. Dr. Brown’s Back Pocket Field Guide provides an overview of common landscapes, wildlife and plants in Orange County wilderness areas. In the 1980s, her husband and daughter spent one Saturday each month with her in the James Dilley Preserve, greeting visitors and handing out trail guides.

Dr. Brown never lost her drive to work on nature conservation and education, but her dual diagnoses of Parkinson’s Disease and Lewy Body Dementia made it impossible for her to continue. She enjoyed hearing about the ongoing efforts of her former colleagues as well as the keen interest that today’s youth show in protecting the environment.

“I met Elisabeth in 1991, when I got involved in protecting the California gnatcatcher and its coastal sage scrub habitat. I found that Elisabeth had already been doing this for years, with major successes in the Laguna Greenbelt. We subsequently had many partnerships, always benefiting from her scientific knowledge, her commitment to conservation and her wisdom in negotiation. Elisabeth had a great wit and upbeat attitude, even in the worst of times. She lifted others’ spirits, and her friendly personality was always a bridge to those on the other side. She never shied from a battle, and never ceased to develop new visionary projects, capturing the imagination and efforts of others. Thank you, Elisabeth, for your friendship and for choosing to save the natural world,” said Dan Silver, executive director of the Endangered Habitats League.

A memorial for Dr. Brown is currently being planned. Her family encourages donations in her memory to Laguna Greenbelt, Inc. Visit www.lagunagreenbelt.org for more information and to leave your thoughts about her life and contributions.

Open story in new window…



MCAFOOSE-SLIDE-2
MCAFOOSE-SLIDE-2
MCAFOOSE-SLIDE-2
MCAFOOSE-SLIDE-2
MCAFOOSE-SLIDE-2
MCAFOOSE-SLIDE-2

ARTS-CENTER-AD-0102

Commission approves plans for Japanese shiatsu massage salon

By SARA HALL

This week, the Laguna Beach Planning Commission unanimously approved plans for an authentic Japanese shiatsu massage salon.

Commissioners voted 4-0 (Susan McLintock Whitin was absent) on Wednesday (July 17) in favor of a conditional use permit for the establishment at 168 Mountain Road. The business will specialize in shiatsu, a form of Japanese bodywork that uses the hands, fingers, palms and feet to apply direct pressure on various points of the body.

Applicant Daisuke Kawaguchi wrote they will offer the authentic service in a unique environment in Laguna Beach.

“We believe there is no other location where clients can enjoy a massage while experiencing the soothing sounds of the ocean with the refreshing sea breeze. Choosing us to have a massage here provides a unique environment exclusive to this place, offering our clients with delightful sensation of shiatsu massage coupled with invigorating energy of the sea,” he wrote.

There wasn’t much discussion on the item, the only public hearing on the agenda for the night.

Commissioners agreed they could make the findings in support of the CUP. It’s also an interesting use and should fit well in the small space.

“It’s always good to have these spaces occupied with something that’s interesting for the community,” said Commissioner Jorg Dubin.

“I’m curious about checking it out,” added Chair Pro Tem Steve Kellenberg.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of City of Laguna Beach

The existing street frontage for the proposed Japanese shiatsu massage salon at 168 Mountain Road

The renovation work on the buildings surrounding this project have been well done, Chair Ken Sadler said, and this should be a positive addition.

Although the project occurs within an Olympic cottage that is listed on the city’s historic register, the use of the cottage for massage services will not cause a substantial adverse change in the significance of the historical structure, according to the staff report. Constructed in advance of the 1932 summer Olympics held in Los Angeles, the cottage was one of many used to house athletes and was later brought to Laguna Beach after the conclusion of the games.

The building has been rehabilitated in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties and the City Council’s Sept. 22, 2020, approval that also involved a historic rehabilitation of the Coast Liquor building on the same site.

City staff confirmed that approval of the project will not interfere with the preservation of the cottage. The proposed massage use does not involve any tenant improvements that would alter historic building features, and any future applications for exterior building signage will be reviewed to ensure that the building’s historic features are retained.

The proposed hours of operation are from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through Saturday, Senior Administrative Analyst Louie Lacasella noted. The tenant space would be divided into a reception area with a retail display (aromatherapy items such as essential oils, bases and containers, and professional supplies for other massage therapists) and treatment area.

David Lee, representing the applicant, confirmed that the service would be conducted for one client at a time and by appointment only.

The project would not result in an intensification of use so it does not require additional off-street parking, he said. It’s also anticipated that this project will experience fewer daily patrons than the previous use due to the proposed operation being appointment only and serving one client at a time, Lacasella added.

Answering a commissioner question about the parking, Lacasella confirmed that since it’s not an intensification of use there is no parking impact. The proposed use is consistent with the previous use, which was space for every 250 square feet of gross floor area, he explained. The spaces don’t have to be designated for the business, just within the site plan, he added.

Lacasella explained that there is one revision to what was listed in the staff report for conditions for approval correcting the site and floor plan.

Answering another commissioner question, the prior use was retail, surf and beach rentals.

The first finding the commission had to make was that the site for the proposed use is adequate in size and topography to accommodate said use, and all yards, spaces, walls and fences, parking, loading and landscaping are adequate to properly adjust such use with the land and uses in the vicinity.

It’s a relatively small space, Sadler pointed out. It’s a small space, but it’s not going to be an intensification of use so it shouldn’t create a parking impact as the existing lot should be enough to service all the neighboring establishments, he added.

The 376 square feet is small, but it’s enough space to make this work, Lee answered. It will fit everything they need: massage bed, changing room and a small desk.

~~~~~~~~

Sara Hall covers City Hall and is a regular contributor to Stu News Laguna.

Open story in new window…











An Attempted Murder by Jack Champion now on display at City Hall

By MARRIE STONE

Photos by Jeff Rovner

This story is a part of our Arts section. For more arts stories as well as our arts calendars, visit www.stunewslaguna.com/arts.

Tom and Lucinda, a pair of 1,000-pound crows, landed on City Hall’s front lawn last week. They’re the latest temporary art installation funded by the lodging establishments of Laguna Beach. Entitled An Attempted Murder (because a murder of crows requires at least three), the birds first appeared at Burning Man in 2017 and at the Smithsonian Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. in 2018. The dedication took place last Friday, July 12, with artist Jack Champion on hand.

Click on photo for a larger image

Jack Champion poses between Tom (left) and Lucinda (right), the two 900-pound crows in his installation “An Attempted Murder”

Apart from providing perfect selfie backdrops and inspiring a few Hitchcock comments, An Attempted Murder might evoke some interesting conversations over the next several months. We’re living through fraught times. Though Tom and Lucinda don’t appear especially happy about it, they do look like they’re still talking (or at least squawking) to each other. Perhaps there’s a lesson in there.

“We’re looking for art that’s a little challenging, gets a conversation going and provides a way for people to engage that’s different from the normal day-to-day,” said Adam Schwerner, vice chair of the Arts Commission. “Art can do that. This piece – because of its scale, quality and the historical references it evokes with the crows – is the perfect installation for our town at this moment. It’s also fun.”

Click on photo for a larger image

(L-R) Laguna Beach Arts Commission members Carl Smith, Michael Ervin, Suzi Chauvel, Pat Kollenda, Adam Schwerner, Mayor Sue Kempf and Donna Ballard

The crows are first sculpted in clay. Then Champion creates a rubber mold and casts the birds in bronze. He named the pair Tom and Lucinda after music he was listening to at the time of their creation.

Champion enjoys the challenge of large-scale design. He also created two 31-foot-tall elephants with obelisks on their backs (an homage to Salvador Dalí) and a 20-foot-long cricket. No matter how big or tall the sculpture, Champion pays careful attention to small details, sculpting skin, feathers and wings to look life-like.

Click on photo for a larger image

Artist Jack Champion has shown the crows both at Burning Man and at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

For Champion, crows are a rare breed, and one he’s had an ongoing relationship with ever since he was a kid visiting his grandma, who had a resident crow. As an adult, the birds have followed his truck and staked out his home, waiting for Champion to feed them. But they bide their time, waiting until he leaves to swoop in for supper. “They’re so smart,” he said.

Champion also draws inspiration from Hieronymus Bosch, the early Dutch master and creator of The Garden of Earthly Delights (1515). Bosch’s surreal and fantastical worlds of exaggerated creatures and their outsized role might be one interesting lens through which to view An Attempted Murder. Stand beneath a 12-foot crow and experience how it feels when the natural world overwhelms us. It might change your perspective. By flipping the scale on size, Champion challenges us to imagine a different way of being in the world – an alternate universe where humans might not be in charge.

City Hall is the perfect setting for two birds seemingly engaged in endless argument. As Mayor Sue Kempf joked at the dedication ceremony, things are often more fun and civil outside the Council meeting room.

“They’re having a dialogue, for sure,” said Arts Commission member Suzi Chauvel. “That’s what I love about them.”

Click on photo for a larger image

Lucinda looks like she has more to say, making her an apropos addition to Laguna’s City Hall lawn

The city routinely works with Building 180 – an art production agency that curates complex installations – to bring these temporary art installations to town. According to Building 180’s mission statement, they “imagine a world where art connects us with one another, and the world around us. A world where art has no boundaries and is made to elevate the human experience, inspire the very best in human nature, and awaken the fullest potential of imagination.” Building 180 also brought Taylor Dean Harrison’s Polymery in March 2023 and Inquire Within by Joel Dean Stockdill and Yustina Salnikova last August.

Click open story button to continue reading…

Open story in new window…

KC-SLIDE-1
KC-SLIDE-1
KC-SLIDE-1
KC-SLIDE-1
KC-SLIDE-1
Slide
Slide
Slide 3
Slide 4
Slide 1
Slide 2
Slide 3

Inside City Hall

Laguna Beach Community,

We have been listening to your input and concerns about visitor impacts on the city and we are taking action. I suggested our City staff work with Los Angeles television station ABC 7 to help us amplify the importance of respectful visitor behavior, with the goal of informing regional visitors about the need to treat our city and beaches with care and adhere to local laws. We did the interview today with the TV crew at City Hall and will be sure to share the story with you when it airs on ABC 7 in the near future.

A few weeks ago, we asked our Police Department to help us hammer home the message of pedestrian and driver safety within our city. The Police Department’s social media team came through! There’s a new Public Service Announcement on pedestrian safety that’s now running on our social media channels.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of City of Laguna Beach

Laguna Beach Mayor Sue Kempf

On the topic of fire safety, we will be hosting a Fire Department Headquarters Open House on Wednesday, July 24 from 4-6 p.m. at the Laguna Beach Community and Recreation Center. This event will feature our fire safety measures, educational tables, the Laguna Beach goats, and an opportunity to meet our new City Manager Dave Kiff, and chat with Fire personnel. We invite everyone to come, enjoy some light bites and refreshments and learn about fire safety. Hope to see you there!

In related news, I recently met with Assemblywoman Diane Dixon for a legislative update. She is hosting a town hall on homeowner insurance related to wildfire risk on July 30 at Soka University from 4-5 p.m. Registration details are available at www.surveymonkey.com/r/7B35N2Q.

Additionally, our city staff is coordinating with Insurance Commissioner Lara’s office to arrange an additional local town hall meeting on insurance issues. Look for an announcement in the upcoming weeks on date and location.

As a city, Laguna Beach is dedicated to engaging in this essential dialogue and supporting initiatives that safeguard our residents. We are actively advocating for policies that guarantee reliable and affordable fire insurance for all Californians.

It is with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of Elisabeth Brown on July 6 at the age of 81. Dr. Brown was a pillar of our community, serving as the president of the Laguna Greenbelt from 1985 through 2019.

Her contributions to environmental conservation in Orange County were monumental. Dr. Brown was part of an Orange County environmental movement that created the South Coast Wilderness, 22,000 acres of contiguous open space within the cities of Aliso Viejo, Irvine, Laguna Beach, Laguna Woods, Newport Beach and unincorporated Orange County.

Her passion for protecting Southern California ecology and her ability to help craft complex conservation agreements led to remarkable achievements. When she was reminded of her accomplishments, she was quick to point out, “I didn’t do it alone.”

Dr. Brown’s legacy continues through her daughter, Mina, who follows in her mother’s footsteps as a valued member of our city’s Environmental Sustainability Committee. In recognition of this extraordinary woman and her lifelong commitment to our environment, the City Council will honor Dr. Brown during Extraordinary Business at our meeting on August 13 at 5 p.m. We invite you all to join us as we remember and celebrate her remarkable life and contributions.

Elisabeth Brown’s tireless work and dedication to our community exemplifies the spirit of Laguna Beach. Her legacy reminds us that through our collective efforts, we can achieve great things. As we honor her memory, let us also reaffirm our commitment to preserving the beauty and vitality of our city. Together, we will continue to make Laguna Beach a safe, vibrant and culturally diverse place to live.

Sue Kempf, Mayor

Open story in new window…






Committee reviews draft Climate Action and Adaptation Plan

By SARA HALL

The Environmental Sustainability Committee reviewed more than a dozen strategies identified in the draft Climate Action and Adaptation Plan and provided feedback to city staff this week.

ESC members discussed the draft CAAP document on Monday (July 15) and examined the strategies aimed at reducing the city’s greenhouse gas emissions and to improve resilience to changing climate hazards. Laguna Beach is working with PlaceWorks to develop the plan, an update to the city’s Climate Protection Action Plan adopted in 2009.

The CAAP document will present these strategies (following revisions by city staff, members of the working group, members of the public, and elected and appointed officials) and their associated actions, organized by topic and goal. The plan will describe each topic, including information about the issue, summaries of existing city and state/regional programs that address the topic, and the gaps and opportunities presented by the topic. For each strategy, the CAAP will describe the strategy, present the associated actions, identify responsible/supporting agencies and core benefits, and present the GHG reductions achieved (if applicable).

Although the strategies covered a range of topics, including transportation, improving disaster resilience, policies for development projects and incorporating zero-emission technology, the Environmental Sustainability Committee focused the discussion on certain items related to their goals.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Mary Hurlbut

The city is working on a Climate Action and Adaptation Plan

According to the recap for the June 25 City Council meeting, staff was directed to determine if efficiencies can be implemented in the process of adopting a CEQA-certified plan, such as reducing remaining public input to committee meetings, so the remaining budget can be focused on implementation, and possibly creating an internal sustainability revolving fund to fund programs.

During his council update at the ESC meeting this week, Mayor Pro Tem Alex Rounaghi, the committee’s council liaison, noted the recent council discussion on the CAAP.

“The take-away was we want to implement things, we want to fund them and get things going,” he said.

Committee Chair Judie Mancuso raised concern that the council wanted to “pull back.”

Rounaghi clarified that nobody said to cut it off, but to instead re-focus the funds. The budget shouldn’t continue to pay for more studying, he commented, but implementation.

“We don’t want to be spending more time on a process, we want to be spending time on action,” he said.

The question is how they get to that point, he noted. Council didn’t articulate what that would look like, that’s for staff to bring back to council with recommendations, Rounaghi added.

“The report…it is where it is, let’s make the best of this thing and get this thing going,” he said.

Staff’s direction from council was to find out if they could recover money and time, and that’s what they’re looking at, said Assistant City Manager Jeremy Frimond. They’re sitting down with the consultants and discussing that while understanding the end goals, he added.

“Can we find efficiencies in the process?” Frimond noted.

A lot of the things that create energy efficiency and reliability are also going to save the city money over time, he noted, the question is how to capture the costs.

ESC member Steve Chadima noted that there are three things they need to work on that will knock out about 60-70 percent of the GHG emissions: Fleet electrification; start the process of solar with battery backups and the microgrid and join a community choice energy program.

They need to determine the benefit of each item so they can prioritize the list, he added.

“Maybe my gut feeling is wrong with those three things – I don’t think it is – but maybe there’s a fourth item that is equally important,” Chadima said. “But we should know that if we pursue these things right away, we don’t need to worry about polishing up the prettiness of the report.”

It’s important to immediately get working on the “low hanging fruit,” he added.

Mancuso noted that the draft plan is robust and full of relevant and noteworthy items. She suggested ranking them in order to provide feedback on what to tackle first.

“We’ve got to wrap our arms around it, right? You can’t have the telephone book (for the CAAP),” she commented.

That’s the next step, ESC member Jacquelin Reed Mutter replied. That discussion should be tabled until they review the draft document.

“The conversation we want to have tonight is: What’s missing? What’s the report? What do we want to add? What’s the feedback?” she said. “That’s the whole purpose of this conversation.”

This is the 30,000-foot-level review, Frimond confirmed.

Frimond specifically asked for feedback on strategy eight, “Encourage visitors to use sustainable transportation alternatives to get to/from Laguna Beach and reduce the number of visitor trips within the city.” Any ideas related to vehicle miles traveled would be helpful, he added.

The entire community suddenly won’t take the bus, he added. They have to be realistic about how people travel and if they can find a cleaner way through incentives, like charging stations, he noted.

“I’m looking for creative strategy and actionable solutions to vehicle miles traveled,” Frimond said.

Click open story button to continue reading…

Open story in new window…

TODDDAVIS-SLIDE-1
TODDDAVIS-SLIDE-1
TODDDAVIS-SLIDE-1
TODDDAVIS-SLIDE-1
TODDDAVIS-SLIDE-1
MSD-QH-0305-SLIDE-1
MSD-QH-0305-SLIDE-1
MSD-QH-0305-SLIDE-1
MSD-QH-0305-SLIDE-1

This summer’s Sawdust Festival offerings include free creative art classes for all ages and abilities

By THERESA KEEGAN

This story is a part of our Arts section. For more arts stories as well as our arts calendars, visit www.stunewslaguna.com/arts.

A stroll into the Sawdust Festival reveals a plethora of creativity. From textile art to ceramics, glassblowing painting and innovative mixed media, visitors are literally surrounded by inspiring artwork.

And that artistic inspiration can be immediately acted upon onsite, thanks to participatory classes with a wide range of offerings.

“The only rule we have is that there’s no wrong way to create art,” said Stephanie Lee, art education program manager. She quickly rattles off the welcoming programs that are offered multiple times throughout the day during the festival, but the Sawdust doesn’t limit opportunities to the summer. In addition to the daily festival classes offered at three different sites, she and AnnJo Droog, director of art education at the Sawdust, coordinate the year-round programming for classes.

“We want to make sure we get art to everyone,” said Lee.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos by Theresa Keegan

Instructor Tristin Cole leads a watercolor class at the Studio One site at the Sawdust Festival. The classes are included with admission and offerings change daily.

All the daily festival classes are included with festival admission. It’s highly recommended to sign up upon entering the festival if you want a specific class or time slot. (Just turn left upon entering, go past the T-shirt shop and there’s a board with all the day’s offerings.)

During the festival there are three different free class areas: Ceramics, Studio One and Art Spot. Each has various offerings and a unique vibe all its own.

Click on photo for a larger image

Ravol Kelly assists a participant in the individualized ceramics classes offered at the festival grounds

Ceramics – The most popular ceramics class is a 10-minute session with a skilled ceramicist. Participants can choose to make a bowl, plate or a cup/vase using the techniques of either throwing a pot or handbuilding. Those who want to throw (and who wouldn’t want to do this fun approach?) sit across from a teacher who guides them through the process on the wheel. It’s perfect for both newcomers and people who have experience working with clay, as the instructors are able to vary their approach based on participants’ skill level.

Click on photo for a larger image

The finished pieces are left to dry while people stroll through the festival grounds. People take them home and can bring them to a pottery studio to have them fired and glazed.

“I guide people through throwing the pots,” said instructor Ravol Kelly, who adds that often an element of joy surfaces during the interaction. “It’s pretty nice showing people something they remember fondly from high school or another time in their lives.”

Sessions begin at 11:30 a.m. each day, and there is a 30-minute break at both 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m., but with multiple wheels and instructors, there’s often room to accommodate most people.

Studio One – This open-air instruction area offers the most diverse classes, with opportunities to create everything from watercolors and embroidery to woodworking and even tile pieces. The diversity keeps this one of the more popular class options, especially for people who attend the festival multiple times throughout the summer. (Class size is usually limited to about a dozen people and a more demanding, skilled class may have an age minimum.)

Click on photo for a larger image

Student artist Kileah Lologo went to the Sawdust to be inspired by looking at the artwork. While there, she also joined a watercolor class. Now she can’t wait to get back into the studio.

Instructor Tristin Cole’s recent watercolor class on whales and seascapes included an introduction asking participants to think about their own experiences at the beach.

“I really wanted to tap into that emotion,” said Cole. “Then they can draw from their own experiences.” She then offered a brief demonstration about watercolor washes. Afterward, participants established an abstract foundation and then had an opportunity to add details with pens.

“When they get into the details, they get into this flow,” said Cole, a professional artist in many media and who has also been an animator for 27 years. “They’re making their painting come to life. I love teaching art to the community.”

Participant Kileah Lologo, 18, is an art student at Orange Coast College and was thrilled with the watercolor class. “She let everybody do what they wanted,” the Garden Grove resident said of the instructor. “I came to the Sawdust to get inspired by all the other artists who are here. It’s been great.”

Click open story button to continue reading…

Open story in new window…

Slide 1
Slide 1

Council to hear update on parking and transportation demand management report implementation, ballot measure resolutions, Hotel Laguna appeal

By SARA HALL

City Council has a varied agenda at next week’s meeting.

At the Tuesday (July 23) meeting, council will consider and/or hear: An update on the parking and transportation demand management report implementation; placement of the sewer service fees as a special assessment on the county tax roll; consider ballot measure resolutions; public hearings for two separate appeals on a residential project and for Hotel Laguna and several ordinances on the consent calendar.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Mary Hurlbut

City Council will hear an update on the implementation of the parking and transportation demand management report

During regular business, council will hear an update on the parking and transportation demand management report implementation.

If approved as recommended, council will direct staff to add a new short-term strategy to investigate the feasibility and potential impacts of converting existing free parking along Coast Highway and other areas of South Laguna to paid public parking spaces.

Staff is also recommending to return to council in July 2025 for the next annual progress report.

Council unanimously accepted the report on parking and transportation demand management on June 13, 2023, and directed staff to proceed with implementation of the identified short-term strategies. At the time, councilmembers provided direction on 10 recommendations.

Overall, at the June 2023 meeting, councilmembers were excited to move forward with the “low hanging fruit” transportation demand management (TDM) strategies. Several also were hesitant about certain parking infrastructure ideas, specifically parking structures.

The report came with nine staff-recommended actions. Council agreed to most, but modified a few with clarified language or specific direction. They also added one additional recommendation into the motion for approval.

The language of the first recommendation was changed so that council would “accept” the report, instead of “adopt” it, which several public speakers argued could be misinterpreted to mean that council was approving implementation of all the projects and programs included in the report.

In another recommendation, staff initially suggested council discuss and select to proceed with next steps for either or both of the two potential new downtown parking structures (a three-level building at 635 Laguna Canyon Road (Village Entrance) and/or a city project for public parking at the Laguna Presbyterian Church site). A majority of councilmembers agreed to direct staff to only pursue next steps for the Village Entrance location.

Part of the approved agenda item also included directing staff to proceed to study the feasibility, cost and benefit of constructing a three-level parking structure with commercial space/housing fronting the primary street on the 1300 block of Glenneyre Street. The project would yield approximately 130 new spaces. Council’s action this week directed staff to approach the property owners to gauge interest in the potential project and, if there is an interest, to return to the City Council with an update.

Council also directed staff to study the feasibility of adding up to three levels of parking at 1900 Laguna Canyon Road (Act V) in conjunction with addressing other city needs, including fleet electrification.

Councilmembers also unanimously agreed to direct staff to proceed with the implementation of all short-term TDM strategies and updates to the city’s parking regulations with the goal of achieving their identified target completion dates as staff and funding resources become available.

The action this week also directed staff to continue evaluating the medium-term TDM strategies and parking regulation updates. Although staff initially proposed that the strategies would be included as feasible in future year goals and budgets, councilmembers agreed to change the language of the item and direct staff to first determine which strategies are feasible and then return to council with recommendations.

They also approved the proposed updates to the city’s parking permit programs and review the prioritized list of potential opportunities for enhancing the city’s public parking supply and direct staff to pursue priority projects.

Another parking infrastructure opportunity listed in the report that council approved is to direct staff to approach Mission Hospital and negotiate a long-term arrangement to develop a long-term lease for top floor of the parking garage at the hospital.

Council also approved that staff pursue the next steps to repurpose underutilized parcels at peripheral locations for publicly available surface parking (locations A-C & E from the report).

They also directed staff to pursue the next steps to potentially construct a partial parking deck addition at the Glenneyre Street parking structure (Lot 6), yielding approximately 37 new spaces.

The action also authorized appropriating $130,000 from the parking fund for the implementation of the short-term TDM strategies.

Councilmembers also agreed to add another recommendation in the approved motion to direct staff to review the complete streets mobility study for other potential strategies.

Click open story button to continue reading…
Open story in new window…

Slide 1
Slide 1

Join Laguna Beach’s First Responders for National Night Out on August 6

On Tuesday, Aug. 6, from 5-8 p.m. at Main Beach, Laguna’s First Responders will gather for National Night Out. Attendees can meet the First Responder teams and learn about what they do.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of LBPD

Meet the City’s First Responders on August 6

They will have demonstrations with drones, fire hoses and a boat rescue from Laguna Beach Police, Fire and Marine Safety.

Nicole Rice, CSO Crime Prevention, Neighborhood Enhancement Team (N.E.T.), Laguna Beach Police Department said, “This is an upcoming event that focuses on the relationship with the community and first responders. We will have demonstrations with drones, fire hoses and a boat rescue from Laguna Beach Police, Fire and Marine Safety. Learn more about what our first responders do and meet our team!”

There will be a food truck/cart, face painting, games, music, and the opportunity to meet K-9s and the SWAT team.

Open story in new window…

ARTS-CENTER-AD-0102


Laguna Presbyterian Church hosts American Red Cross Blood Drive on August 9

On Friday, Aug. 9 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., the American Red Cross will hold a blood drive at Laguna Presbyterian Church, Tankersley Hall, 415 Forest Ave., Laguna Beach.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Laguna Presbyterian Church

(L-R) Sandy Grim, who coordinates the blood drives at Laguna Presbyterian and volunteers Bonnie David and Diane Riegler at the April blood drive. Laguna Presbyterian Church’s unique location in the heart of Laguna Beach makes it especially easy for volunteers and donors to consistently participate in the worthwhile efforts of the American Red Cross blood drives.

Join them at “Camp Do Good,” and give blood! Every unit of blood collected can mean the world to someone in need. Donors from throughout our community are welcome to give blood. Schedule your appointment by clicking here and use sponsor code lagunap.

You can streamline your donation experience and save up to 15 minutes by visiting www.redcrossblood.org/rapidpass to complete your pre-donation reading and health history questions on the day of your appointment.

As a thanks for all donors who come to give blood from August 1-31, they’ll get a $20 Amazon.com Gift Card by email. Plus, they’ll get a Bonus $100 Amazon.com Gift Card by email when they meet their blood drive goal.

Open story in new window…

ARTS-PAGE-FEBRUARY-0119


Letters to the Editor

Shame on Tom Johnson for using ill-advised words in discussing Trump assassination attempt

Since the end of June when the United States Supreme Court handed down one defeat after another for democracy culminating in its breathtaking decision of July 1 in Donald J. Trump v. The United States in which the former president – and all future presidents – were granted absolute immunity before the law, we the people of the United States have been dealt one body blow after another.

To read, then, in our local online community news source the 41 words Tom Johnson chose to use in his Tuesday, July 15 Fair Game column to make an ill-conceived reference to the assassination attempt last Saturday of the former president by implicating the current president with innuendo is another low point for democracy. As not only a reader of this community news source, but someone who understands both the power and the responsibility inherent in the language we use, I cry, “Foul”!

I am a lifelong reader of poetry and philosophy, of politics and newspapers. The best writers know it is their duty to make their voices heard AND to leave space for their readers to learn something about who they are, about who they might aspire to be, and about what sort of world they might want to create for themselves and all the others out there in this one small world we share. But our language has grown coarse and grows coarser still because we are mimicking the worst impulses of what many have come to see as true leadership.

This is dangerous ground. We should reject it every time it is suggested to us as normal human behavior.

In the days after Saturday’s violence, David Remnick, an editor of The New Yorker, chose to remind his readers of the words Robert F. Kennedy composed and spoke before an audience of fellow Americans in April 1968 to address the assassination days before of the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.:

“Our lives on this planet are too short and the work to be done too great to let this spirit flourish any longer in our land. Of course we cannot vanish it with a program, nor with a resolution. But we can perhaps remember – even if only for a time – that those who live with us are our brothers (fellow citizens), that they share with us the same short movement of life, they seek – as we do – nothing but the chance to live out their lives in purpose and happiness, winning what satisfaction and fulfillment they can. Surely this bond of common faith, this bond of common goal, can begin to teach us something. Surely, we can learn, at least, to look at those around us as fellow men (and human beings), and surely, we can begin to work a little harder to bind up the wounds among us and to become in our hearts brothers and countrymen (fellow citizens) once again.”

Let’s be better. Let’s be kinder. Let’s get to work.

Sarah E Vogel

Laguna Beach

Red flags help pedestrians cross streets safely

I’ve just returned from a weekend in Seattle where I saw something new. At least, it was new to me. Modeled after other cities like Bridgeport, Conn. and Salt Lake City, Seattle has placed red flags in baskets on opposite sides of streets to help pedestrians cross both ways safely.

Waving my flag as I walked across a busy intersection, I couldn’t help but think about Laguna’s busy streets. Could red flags help prevent mishaps at the intersection of Forest and Ocean near City Hall? Could red flags help pedestrians cross Glenneyre at Mermaid near the library? Or, could red flags alert motorists that people were crossing PCH on their way to or from the beach?

Public safety is a key goal of city councilmembers or would-be members. Salt Lake reports each flag costs 50 cents. If you ask me, this seems like a cost-effective way to help protect pedestrians crossing Laguna’s streets safely.

Denny Freidenrich

Laguna Beach

Open story in new window…

CLASS-UPDATE-0102


Festival of Arts Summer Concert Series schedule through July

From July 3 through August 30, join Festival of Arts (FOA) for live music on the Festival’s Concert Stage. This year’s concert line-up features Grammy winner Poncho Sanchez and the Eagles All Stars. Concerts are free with Festival admission.

The daily schedule for Festival of Arts Summer Concert Series is now available online by clicking here.

All concerts are free with Festival admission.

For select concerts, limited “nightclub” seating is available in the reserved section for an additional fee. To reserve seats, click here.

Fri., July 19, 5:30-7 p.m., The Eagles Allstars, Country Rock, Tremendous Tributes, $45

Sat., July 20, 1-2:30 p.m., BPM (Brian Bromberg, Paul Brown, Michael Paulo), Jazz Concerts on the Green, $60

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of FOA

John Proulx Trio performs on July 20

Sat., July 20, 5:30-7 p.m., John Proulx Trio, Jazz, Spotlight on the Music of Hope Blue Piano

Sponsored by City of Hope, $45

Sun., July 21, 1-2:30 p.m., Laguna Community Concert Band, Jazz

Sun., July 21, 5:30-7 p.m., Raffia Thomas, R&B/Soul, Wow… That Girl Can Sing! $45

Mon., July 22, 5:30-7 p.m., Buzz Campbell and the Heartaches, Rockabilly Americana, $30

Tues., July 23, 5:30-7 p.m., Quarteto Nuevo, Jazz, $30

Wed., July 24, 5:30-7 p.m., Beth and Steve Wood, Folk/Rock, $30

Thurs., July 25, 5:30-7 p.m., Spencer Day, Jazz – Art, Jazz, Wine & Chocolate

Sponsored by Charles Schwab and Cambria Estate Winery, $50

Fri., July 26, 5:30-7 p.m., Tony Guerrero – A Tribute to Chuck Mangione, Jazz Tremendous Tributes, $45

Sat., July 27, 1-2:30 p.m., Poncho Sanchez, Latin Jazz, Concerts on the Green, $60

Sat., July 27, 5:30-7 p.m., Scott Wilkie Trio, Jazz, Spotlight on the Music of Hope Blue Piano

Sponsored by City of Hope, $45

Sun., July 28,12-3 p.m., Miskey Mountain Boys, Bluegrass

Click on photo for a larger image

Lia Booth – July 28

Sun., July 28, 5:30-7 p.m., Lia Booth, Jazz Wow… That Girl Can Sing! $45

Mon., July 29, 5:30-7 p.m., Eugene Edwards Band, Country/Rock, Americana, $30

Tues., July 30, 5:30-7 p.m., “Listen to the Seventies” – Folk/Rock, $30

Wed., July 31, 5:30-7 p.m., Opera Laguna, Opera, $30

Open story in new window…


Sawdust Festival brings lots of fun in the sun at Surf Day on July 23

The Sawdust Festival is in full swing. Visitors can look forward to amazing art and artisan creations, music, classes and food, all in an idyllic canyon setting.

Nighttime is the right time for Sawdust – Art, Ale, Music & More: Sawdust Art Festival shines even brighter at night, transforming into a magical evening escape. Sunday through Thursday, open until 8 p.m. – your go-to spot for after-work unwinding. On weekends, the enchantment continues until 10 p.m., setting the stage for unforgettable date nights. As twilight falls, their art-filled pathways come alive with twinkling lights, creating a magical ambience perfect for couples and friends alike. Enjoy the cool evening air as you sip craft beers or local wines, browse unique artworks and let live music serenade you under the stars.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Sawdust

Sawdust transforms into a magical evening escape

July at Sawdust Art Festival is sizzling with excitement, offering an explosion of creativity that showcases Southern California’s largest gathering of emerging artists.

Special Events

Sip, Talk & Walk Wine Tasting & Docent-Led Tour

Wednesdays | 3-4 p.m.

Wine Tasting with Jackson Family Wines

Fridays | 6-9:30 p.m.

Sawdust Fashion Show

Sunday, Aug. 4 | 12-2 p.m.

Artists’ Benevolence Fund Auction

Sunday, Aug. 11 | 12-3 p.m.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Mary Hurlbut

Don’t miss the magic of Sawdust

Where Art Meets Magic at the 58th Annual Sawdust Art Festival: Open daily: through Sunday, September 1

Hours of Operation: Sunday – Thursday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m, Friday – Saturday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

Single-day admission tickets may be used any day of the summer festival:  $12 for adults. $10 for seniors, ages 65 and up. $5 for children ages 6-12. Children ages 5 and under receive free admission and do not require a ticket to enter.

Single day and annual pass tickets are available.

Summer Sale! Save $2 off with promo code: summer24.

For tickets, click here.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Sawdust

Glassblowing demonstration

Classes:

There are complimentary classes in three studios. Classes are based on a first-come, first-served policy. They cannot be pre-booked. They are free unless otherwise stated. All classes are subject to availability. For pottery, please sign-up the same day at the Ceramics Studio as spaces fill up early.

Classes are available in Studio One, Art Spot and the Ceramic Center.

For a full listing of classes, click here.

Music:

Three entertainment stages feature live music and entertainment every day of the show. Roaming acts also include balloon artistry, magic shows and acoustic guitarists.

For a full listing of music, click here.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Instagram

The Heretics – July 20

Artists:

Shop handcrafted art by 180 Laguna Beach artists in a variety of media including ceramics, painting, jewelry, glass, photography and more. For a full listing of artists, click here.

Don’t miss the chance to meet April Solomon, Sawdust’s dragon specialist, at Booth 111, or witness artist Ed Chang exhibiting his captivating photography at Booth 609. With unforgettable experiences around every corner, Sawdust is the ultimate destination for art enthusiasts. Grab your tickets now and dive into this artistic adventure that promises to ignite your imagination and leave you spellbound.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Sawdust

Sawdust Saloon

Outdoor Dining

Grab a drink at the Sawdust Saloon and enjoy a bite to eat at one of our six outdoor dining options that include Evan’s Gourmet, GG’s Mediterranean, Taco Loco by Chef Gonzalo Rebollar, Espresso on the Go and Fran’s Popcorn.

For a list of concessions, click here.

Special Events & Theme Days

–Sip, Talk & Walk Wine Tasting & Docent-Led Tour: Wednesdays | 3-4 p.m.

–Surf Day: Tuesday, July 23 and Tuesday, Aug. 20 | 11 a.m.-8 p.m.

–‘80s Day: Saturday, July 27 | 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

–Country Western Day: Saturday, Aug. 3 | 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

–Beatles Day: Saturday, Aug. 17 | 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

For a listing of OC Resident Nights and Free County Days, click here.

Artist Note:

Note from Sawdust artist Joan Gladstone: She will be introducing vibrant new oil paintings that celebrate summer and iconic California coast imagery. The Sawdust Festival opens June 28 and continues every day through September 1. “This is my fourth year exhibiting at the Sawdust Art Festival, Southern California’s premier outdoor art festival. I’ll teach a watercolor class every Monday at 2 p.m.” There are art classes for all ages, great music and a magical atmosphere are always free with admission.

Courtesy of Joan Gladstone

“American Dream” by Joan Gladstone

Sawdust Art Classes has many expressive and informative classes offered every week that the Sawdust Art Festival wants to share with you (far too many to mention here!). For more information, click here.

Courtesy of Sawdust

Intro to Mosaic Art – July 20

Saturday, July 20

Introduction to Mosaic Art

A two-day workshop over two weekends

The ancient art of mosaics is one of the most beautiful and oldest in the history of mankind. Working closely with Ron Shearer, you will create a mosaic that you will be proud to display. It will open a whole new world of creativity that you can easily continue on your own. Step-by-step, he will take you through the process of design, materials, cutting techniques and then carefully guide you through the application, initially using glue for positioning. You’ll have a little bit of fun “homework” to do between classes. When you return to the second workshop, you can home in on the fine details and finishing your artwork. A wonderful, informative and creative workshop, and one that we have had many requests for. This workshop is suitable for absolute beginners or those who want to fine-tune their skills. All materials are provided including supplies from WitsEnd Mosaics.

Click open story button to continue reading…

Open story in new window…


Laguna Bluebelt Photo Exhibition 2024 opens at LCAD on August 1

There will be an opening reception on Thursday, Aug. 1 from 6-9 p.m. at LCAD Gallery for the photography exhibit from the Laguna Bluebelt’s 13th annual photo contest.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Craig Hatfield

“Sunset Lookout” by photographer Craig Hatfield, which earned Honorable Mention, 2023

Laguna College of Art + Design’s Gallery is proud to present original photography from the Laguna Bluebelt’s 13th annual photo contest winners, celebrating Laguna’s Marine Protected Areas (MPA) and their diversity. This exhibition is comprised of professional and amateur photos that capture the natural beauty of the Laguna Bluebelt’s beaches, marine life and recreation from above and below, while bringing attention to the importance of conserving and protecting this invaluable resource.

The Laguna Bluebelt Coalition brings together organizations and individuals with a common goal of protecting and restoring sea life, conserving biological diversity and maintaining healthy, sustainable marine habitats for all plant, fish and animal species.

LCAD Gallery, 374 Ocean Ave., Laguna Beach.

LCAD Gallery admission is always free.

Open story in new window…


LPAPA presents Plein Talk by Aimee Erickson at LPAPA Gallery on July 21

2024 Juried Signature Artist Members

LPAPA announced and congratulated their eight newly juried 2024 Signature Artist Members who have been added to their prestigious LPAPA Signature Artist roster:David R. Becker (Ingleside, Ill.), Philip Alexander Carlton (Fruita, Colo.), Son Do (Westminister, Calif.), Mary Garrish (Merritt Island, Fla.), Danny Griego (San Diego, Calif.), Joe Mancuso (Torrance, Calif.), Manon Sander (North Palm Beach, Fla.) and Svetlin Sofroniev (Bulgaria).

LPAPA’s Annual “From Dusk to Dawn”

LPAPA’s Annual “From Dusk to Dawn” juried nocturne art show will feature both plein air and studio works. Gallery exhibition dates for the juried Finalists are August 1 through September 2 with juried Semi-Finalists to be exhibited at City Hall.

Five cash awards to be given with the top prize of $500. Plus, all submitting members receive $5 in LPAPA Loyalty Reward credits.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of LPAPA

Annual “Less is More gallery reception on July 11 during First Thursdays Art Walk

18th Annual Less is More” Award Winners

The show opened with an online Art Catalog and Preview Auction on Monday, July 1.

LPAPA shared the 18th Annual “Less is More” Juried Small Works Art Show award winners:

1st Place: Judd Mercer, 2nd Place: Krentz Johnson, 3rd Place: Carol VanVooren and Honorable Mention: Danny Folkman. Special thanks to their Awards Judge Debra Huse, and their Jurors John Budicin, Toni Kellenberg and Tracie Sullivan.

The show will be at the LPAPA Gallery through Monday, July 29 and can be viewed online through the link below. Gallery hours are Thursday through Monday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment, with extended hours to 9 p.m. the first Thursday of each month for Art Walk.

Four cash awards to be presented.

Click on photo for a larger image

Aimee Erickson Exhibition – Through July 29

Aimee Erickson: Artist in Residence at the LPAPA Gallery

Online Preview Auction & LPAPA Gallery Show through July 29.

Plein Talk at the LPAPA Gallery: Sunday, July 21, 5:30-7:30 p.m.

The LPAPA Gallery is pleased to present their Artist in Residence Showcase Exhibition featuring original works by Signature Artist Aimee Erickson will have a gallery opening at 11 a.m. and a post-holiday First Thursday Art Walk Reception on Thursday, July 11, 6-9 p.m.

The art show and sale continue through Monday, July 29.

Laguna Plein Air Painters Association/LPAPA Gallery is located at 414 N. Coast Highway, Laguna Beach.

Click here to access LPAPA’s calendar and event schedule.

For more information, go to www.lpapa.org.

Open story in new window…


Festival of Arts weekly events – July 22 through July 28

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of FOA

Art Class

Workshops at the Art Center – Sponsored by Bank of America

Drop in and create your own masterpiece with ceramics, printmaking and multi-media art. The Art Center is open daily: 4-8 p.m. on Monday – Thursday; 12- 8 p.m. on Friday – Sunday. Closed Saturday, Aug. 24. For groups of six or more, click here. The Festival’s Art Center is sponsored by Bank of America. For more information, click here.

Nightly Music Schedule

For complete bios on the performers, click here.

Concerts are free with $10 Festival admission. Limited nightclub seating available in the reserved section for $30 per person per concert, with a $5 per person service charge applied to all orders. Includes admission to the Festival of Arts Fine Art Show. Reservations must be made prior to 9 p.m. the night before the performance.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Lily Fassnacht

Buzz Campbell – July 22

Monday, July 22, 5:30-7 p.m.

Performer: Americana Music Series with Buzz Campbell and the Heartaches

Buzz Campbell is an American guitarist, vocalist and songwriter. He founded his group, Hot Rod Lincoln, from San Diego in 1990. Hot Rod Lincoln was heavily influenced by early rock and roll and rockabilly. They quickly made a name for themselves in the San Diego area. Shortly after forming the group, Campbell met Lee Rocker, bassist of the Stray Cats, after opening for him and approached Rocker about producing his first release. Rocker produced the self-titled CD, Hot Rod Lincoln, in 1992 as well as Blue Cafe, the band’s third CD, in 1996. Buzz Campbell and the Heartaches is Buzz’s newest project.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of FOA

Quartet Nuevo – July 23

Tuesday, July 23, 5:30-7 p.m.

Quarteto Nuevo

Quarteto Nuevo merges western classical, eastern European folk, Latin and jazz with an organic feel that packs a wallop. Their unique instrumentation – soprano saxophone/alto flute (Damon Zick), cello (Jacob Szekely), guitar (Kenton Youngstrom) and hand percussion (Felipe Fraga) – richly colors their wide-ranging repertoire, from Heitor Villa-Lobos’ “Bachianas Brasileiras” and Chick Corea’s “Children’s Song No. 6” to Traditional Macedonian “Gadjarsko” and original works “Hector, Desmond and Titus,” “Rain Song” and “Dizer O Que.”

Wednesday, July 24, 5:30-7 p.m.

Beth and Steve Wood

Beth Fitchet Wood is a singer, guitarist, composer and producer. Her main influences are in the folk, pop, musical theater, jazz and rock ‘n roll genres. She was in the Southern California band Honk in the early ‘70s, who released three albums and toured nationally with Loggins and Messina, Chicago and the Beach Boys. After Honk, Fitchet Wood played in just about every conceivable musical format, in most kinds of venues. She also toured the world as a background vocalist and assistant producer. Steve Wood is a founding member of the legendary Southern California band Honk, famous for the music in the cult classic film Five Summer Stories.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of FOA

Art, Jazz, Wine and Chocolate Series with Spence Day – July 25

Thursday, July 25, 5:30-7 p.m.

Art, Jazz, Wine and Chocolate Series with Spencer Day

Music series sponsored by Charles Schwab and Cambria Estate Winery.

Cost: $25 for wine and chocolate pairings in addition to $10 Festival admission. Limited “nightclub” seating available in reserved section for $50 per person, plus $5 service charge (includes Festival admission). Reservations must be made prior to 9 p.m. the night before the performance. Must be 21 and over to participate in wine tastings.

Spencer Day is a #1 Billboard jazz/pop singer and songwriter who has played venues as diverse as Lincoln Center, the Hollywood Bowl and London’s West End. Day is a widely acclaimed songwriter creating witty and sophisticated pop songs in the tradition of classic jazz American writers. The Washington Post praised his “cool jazz sensibilities” and “cleverly crafted tales.” Time Out New York called him “a compelling, quirky singer-songwriter.”

Friday, July 26, 5:30-7 p.m.

Tremendous Tributes Music Series with Tony Guerrero and his Tribute to Chuck Mangione

Concert free with $10 Festival admission. Limited “nightclub” seating available in reserved section for $45 per person per concert, plus $5 service charge (includes Festival admission). Reservations must be made prior to 9 p.m. the night before the performance.

Since his first solo release in 1988, Tony Guerrero has established himself in a variety of areas. His work as a contemporary jazz flugelhornist, trumpeter, composer and producer has garnered him both critical success and a worldwide audience. He has toured the United States and much of the world as a headliner in major jazz festivals, concert halls and clubs, and has enjoyed commercial radio success not only with his own releases but with music he’s written for other artists.

Click open story button to continue reading…

Open story in new window…


Crystal Cove Conservancy adds Cove Talk with Avi Garbow to summer programming line-up

Crystal Cove Conservancy (The Conservancy) continues their exciting program offerings with the addition of an environmental advocacy-themed Cove Talk with President of Resources Legacy Fund Avi Garbow, on August 7 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Tickets for the event are $10 for Crystal Cove Conservancy members and $15 for non-members and can be purchased by clicking here.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of Crystal Cove Conservancy

Avi Garbow

Crystal Cove Conservancy President & CEO Kate Wheeler will guide the conversation with Garbow as they discuss coastal conservation issues, including the relevance of smaller marine conservation areas like Crystal Cove, climate change, and the many facets and power of environmental advocacy. Guests will also engage with Garbow during an audience Q&A and enjoy a sunset reception with light bites and drinks.

A nationally recognized environmental leader, lawyer and advocate, Garbow has decades of experience tackling many of the most critical threats to our air, water, lands and communities. In addition to his role at Resources Legacy Fund (RLF), Garbow was also recently elected to the Crystal Cove Conservancy board of directors. Garbow is president of RLF-affiliated organizations Fund for a Better Future and Shared Ascent Fund. He most recently served as Patagonia’s Environmental Advocate, providing strategic leadership and vision to the company’s robust environmental advocacy efforts, and held senior leadership positions in the Biden and Obama administrations. More information about Garbow and Resources Legacy Fund can be found at www.resourceslegacyfund.org.

The Conservancy’s extensive program offerings will continue through the end of October, offering a variety of hands-on exploration of history, art, nature and more for all ages. Registration is required for certain programs, which are noted below.

2024 Summer & Fall Programs

The Great Plein Air Art Experience

Every Monday and Wednesday through October 30; except Sept. 2 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Registration is required for these events.

Celebrate more than 100 years of plein air art at Crystal Cove State Park and spend a relaxing day capturing the beauty of the Cove on canvas with a Crystal Cove plein air artist. During these four-hour classes, painters will take part in living history while learning the step-by-step process of creating a plein air painting from beginning to end. Each class will have a break for lunch, but lunch is not provided. Classes are offered for ages 16 and up.

Click on photo for a larger image

Tuesdays in the Commons offers hands-on educational activities

Tuesdays in the Commons

Every Tuesday through September 10 from 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Stop by the Education Commons in the Crystal Cove State Park Historic District each week on Tuesday for new hands-on educational activities that will help participants learn about ongoing conservation work at the park, the critical habitats at Crystal Cove, and how it all connects with landscape scale efforts to protect and preserve the natural world.

Explore the Cove Science Hikes

Fourth Saturday of each month: July 27, August 24 and September 28 from 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Registration is required for these events, click here.

Take a hike with a Conservancy educator to explore Crystal Cove State Park’s geological and ecological systems. Explore the impacts and challenges of climate change including fire ecology, ecological restoration, coastal engineering and marine conservation, as well as native versus non-native species and their impact on natural communities and ecosystem functions.

Historic District Walking Tours

Fourth Saturday of each month: July 27, August 24 and September 28 from 2-3 p.m.

Historic District Walking Tours return to Crystal Cove State Park. During this 60-minute tour led by Conservancy educators and former cottage residents, participants will step back in time to explore the history of Crystal Cove and the Historic District’s rescue and restoration.

Movies on the Beach

Monthly: July 25, August 22 and September 19; click here for showtimes.

Grab your friends and family, blankets and beach chairs, and join Crystal Cove Conservancy for movie night under the stars. Check The Conservancy’s website for details including times and movie titles.

Cove Talks

Cove Talk: A Conversation with Avi Garbow

Wednesday, Aug. 7 from 4:30-6:30 p.m.; click here for upcoming dates. Registration is required for these events.

The Conservancy’s “Cove Talks” aim to bring influential individuals working to change the world to Crystal Cove State Park, as they share a diverse collection of experiences and viewpoints. These talks are another step towards connecting the community to the natural world, while deepening their understanding of issues facing local parks, the coast and the planet.

Grunion Run

Tuesday, Aug. 20. Click here for additional details. Registration is required for this event.

This one-night-only event will open your eyes to the world of the grunion. Join Conservancy and Park educators to learn about the grunion run phenomenon and the importance of coastal and ocean conservation, followed by a guided observation of the silvery fish as they emerge from the water to spawn.

For more information about summer and fall programming at Crystal Cove and to register for upcoming programs, visit https://crystalcove.org/events.

Open story in new window…


LAM adds exciting summer events

Leave a Legacy

Lobby tiles are a great way to: Support the mission of the museum. Leave a lasting legacy with your name. Give a unique gift to honor a loved one, friend or colleague or promote your business.

Contact Crystal Tosello if you would like to donate $10,000 for a custom tile engraving. Crystal Tosello, development manager, ctosello@lagunaartmuseum.org, 949.494.8971, ext. 215.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of LAM

Support the mission of LAM with a lobby tile

LAM introduces Art Museum Neighborhood Nights

All summer long, locals can take advantage of a free night at the Laguna Art Museum (LAM) with a raffle, tours, local food and drinks (LAM is collaborating with local spots), and activities for the entire family.

Each part of the Laguna community has their own night.

Free nights (5-7 p.m.)

Thursday, July 18 – The Village

Thursday, Aug. 15 – South Laguna

Thursday, Sept. 12 – Top of the World

A Summer of Fun and Learning, begins in June

Throughout summer 2024, LAM will be welcoming kids into the museum for expanded learning and creative opportunities that can be found only at Laguna Art Museum. Starting off with their Summer Camp, they will announce new phases of LAM Kids Summer on this page. Stay tuned and make sure you register!

For classes, click here.

Click on photo for a larger image

Kids Camp runs through July 29

LAM Kids Summer Fridays

Drop in and create masterpieces of your own. From 11 a.m.-4 p.m. every summer Friday, their Studio/Lab is open to all kids who want to explore their creativity and participate in hands-on art projects. Members of the Education Staff will be onsite to help kids find inspiration and create their works of art.

Drop ins are free with museum admission.

Click on photo for a larger image

Adam Neeley, “Modern Alchemy” continues through July 29

–Modern Alchemy: The Fusion of Art and Nature in the Jewelry Designs of Adam Neeley

Adam Neeley is an award-winning artist/jeweler who transforms precious metals and gemstones into wearable art by traditional goldsmith techniques and modern technologies. His unique designs are inspired by the vast variety of shapes and colors found in the natural world. In fact, it was his childhood interest in collecting rocks that eventually drew Neeley to the master goldsmiths in Italy, where he would study the art of jewelry making. Eventually he developed his own style and techniques of goldwork that have won him international acclaim, as well as prestigious awards across the jewelry industry.

Exhibitions:

Click on photo for a larger image

“Skyward” by Eric Theodore

Reflections of Resilience through August 25

Reflections of Resilience presents a sampling of the artwork from the 2024 Master of Fine Art graduates from Laguna College of Art + Design (LCAD). Remarkable artists are attracted to LCAD because of the understanding that time-honored skill joined with personal contemporary concerns can create vital, memorable art.

LAM is delighted to introduce Cara Baxter, Jason Dowd, Amber Foote, Sara Khakpour, Ryanne Phillips, Janaise Sanchez, Eric Theodore and Kevin Yaun.

On the Edge through September 2

Joan and Jack Quinn Family Collection

Joan and Jack Quinn represent a crucial moment in art history, as Los Angeles came to symbolize an innovative and prolific brand of creative freedom. On the Edge: Los Angeles Art from the Joan and Jack Quinn Family Collection, explores the experimental approaches to minimalism and new materials from the 1960s through 2000s, the diversification of practices and makers, and the vital role the Quinns played in both documenting and contributing to the story of Los Angeles art. Revealed is a period of artmaking that is pivotal to understanding current practices and the west coast mentality, and collectively exudes a unique spirit of anti-conformity and the “California Cool” ethos.

Click on photo for a larger image

Creation Station Day Camp – July 15

Monday, July 15, 9:30 a.m.- 2 p.m.

Creation Station Day Camp

Are you ready to dive into a world of imagination and invention? Do you love crafting with LEGOS® and designing epic Hot Wheels tracks? Then buckle up, because this is the summer day camp where your wildest creations come to life. Join us for a one-of-a-kind adventure where you’ll become the mastermind behind your own world. From towering skyscrapers to winding racetracks, the possibilities are endless.

LAM Kids’ Summer Mini Camp Series

Keep the summer fun going with their exclusive After-Summer Day Camp Mini Series, happening at Laguna Art Museum. Designed to complement your day camp experience, these two-hour sessions from 3-5 p.m. offer kids the perfect opportunity to continue their creative journey in a unique and inspiring setting.

Summer Day Camp

$75 for members

$95 for non-members

$60 for two or more siblings for members

$80 for two or more siblings for non-members

A healthy snack will be provided by the museum. Campers should bring their own lunches.

Registration fees are fully refundable up to four weeks prior to the scheduled day camp session.

Mini Session

Monday, Aug. 5 from 3-5 p.m.

$30 for members

$55 for non-members

$25 for two or more siblings for members

$50 for two or more siblings for non-members

For registration, click here.

Click open story button to continue reading…

Open story in new window…


LBCAC adds concerts for August

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of LBCAC

Lurrie Bell – July 19

Friday, July 19, 8 p.m.

Guitarist Lurrie Bell

Lurrie Bell was voted Most Outstanding Guitar Player in the 2007 Living Blues Magazine’s Critic’s Poll, and in 2008 and 2012 he was named the magazine’s Male Blues Artist of the Year. Since 2007, he has received multiple Blues Music Award nominations as Best Guitarist and Best Traditional Male Blues Artist by the Blues Foundation.

For tickets, click here.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of LBCAC

Eric Henderson – July 28

Sunday, July 28, Aug. 11 and 25

Summer Concert Series, every other Sunday

Step into the world of musical enchantment with a LBCAC Summer Concert Series, featuring the internationally acclaimed Concert Guitarist Eric Henderson and his extraordinary quartet, Malaga.

Witness the magic as Curtis Mathewson and Richard Bredice mesmerize on electric guitar, Henderson serenades on Spanish guitar, Jimmy Perez sets the rhythm on bass and Frank Cotinola brings beats to life on drums.

Experience the soulful resonance of the guitar in the intimate setting of OC’s premier listening room, where every note is a symphony of emotions. Join this unforgettable evening filled with Spanish classical guitar masterpieces by Henderson and a captivating blend of new tunes and timeless classics like “Little Wing” and “Paint It Black.” Embrace the harmonious fusion of talent and passion at LBCAC’s Summer Concert Series

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of LBCAC

Daisy Abrams and Chuck Roberts – August 6

Tuesday, Aug. 6, 7 p.m.

Beth’s Tuesdays featuring Daisy Abrams and Chuck Roberts

Concerts are in person and held at the Laguna Beach Cultural Arts Center, 235 Forest Ave., Laguna Beach on a Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door, + $1.50 credit card fees.

For tickets, click here.

LBCAC is located at 235 Forest Ave., Newport Beach.

Laguna Beach Cultural Arts Center concessions available, not currently ADA accessible, steep stairs only.

Check out the calendar at www.lbculturalartscenter.org.

Open story in new window…


Cruising the beach

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Mary Hurlbut

No better way to enjoy our world

Open story in new window…


A glimpse at Crystal Cove in Summer

Crystal Cove Conservancy has kicked off the 2024 summer season with extensive programming for all ages that span from the beach to the trails. Visitors will be delighted to see a combination of new and returning programs at Crystal Cove State Park, as well as extended dates for one of the Conservancy’s most popular programs – “The Great Plein Air Art Experience,” which will now run through October.

“Summertime at Crystal Cove is magical – and our programs team has been working all year to create new opportunities for folks to explore the park and to reimagine old favorites,” said Crystal Cove Conservancy President & CEO Kate Wheeler. “Our team has been testing new ideas like science hikes and rethinking and expanding classics like the Historic District Walking Tours and movies on the beach to create a menu of programs to help parkgoers deepen their connection with the park and become part of protecting it.”

From hands-on explorations of history and nature to art classes and conservation stewardship, there is something for everyone to explore during the summer at Crystal Cove.

Click on photo for a larger image

Sign up to spend a relaxing day capturing the beauty of the Cove on canvas with Crystal Cove plein air artist, Debbie Morines

The Great Plein Air Art Experience every Monday and Wednesday through October, except September 2 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Registration is required. Celebrate more than 100 years of plein air art at Crystal Cove State Park and spend a relaxing day capturing the beauty of the Cove on canvas with Crystal Cove plein air artist, Debbie Morines. During these four-hour classes, you’ll take part in living history while learning the step-by-step process of creating your very own plein air painting from beginning to end. Each class will have a break for lunch, but lunch is not provided. Classes are for ages 18 and up. Register here for July 10. Register here for July 15. Register here for July 17. For additional dates, visit https://crystalcove.org/art-class/.

Tuesdays in the Commons: Hands-on Educational Activities from 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. (July 16, 23 and 30).

Stop by the Education Commons in the Crystal Cove State Park Historic District each week on Tuesday for new hands-on educational activities that will help participants learn about ongoing conservation work at the park, the critical habitats at Crystal Cove, and how it all connects with landscape scale efforts to protect and preserve the natural world. Park at the Los Trancos lot near the trailer then walk through the tunnel to the Education Commons (PCH inland at stoplight Los Trancos). $15 day use fee.

Junior Ranger Programs, Tuesday and Thursday mornings continuing through July 30 from 10-11 a.m. Join a Park Ranger for a fun introduction to the animals and plants of Crystal Cove State Park in their weekly Junior Ranger programs. This children’s nature program is a favorite in State Parks and allows kids to earn a badge, stamps, a poster, or a patch. Each Tuesday they will focus on tidepools and on Thursdays they will learn about sharks. Meet at the Berns Amphitheater (PCH inland at stoplight School-State Park, follow signs towards the Campground.) $15 day use fee. No program on July 4.

Walk on the Wild Side, Friday, July 19 at 10 a.m. At Crystal Cove, you walk upon some of the rarest land in Southern California: coastal sage scrub. Join a park docent for a Walk on the Wild Side and enjoy a one-hour stroll learning about this amazing native habitat as you walk along a boardwalk to the beautiful Pacific Ocean. Meet at Pelican Point parking lot #2, at the top of the boardwalk near the parking lot (PCH coastward at Newport Coast, right at kiosk to first lot.) $15 day use fee.

Whale, Dolphin & Wildlife “Twalk,” Saturday, July 20 from 9-11 a.m. Crystal Cove State Park is a great spot to look for resident dolphins, migrating whales and birds just passing by the coastline. Join a park naturalist for a Whale, Dolphin & Wildlife “Twalk” and learn some fun facts about the coastal creatures as you walk the bluff trail and scan the ocean at each overlook. Bring binoculars for better viewing. Meet at Pelican Point lot #4 (PCH coastward at Newport Coast left at kiosk to the last lot.) $20 day use fee.

Full Moon Hike on Saturday, July 20 from 7:45-10 p.m. Explore the park after dark, on a guided interpretive two-hour, four-mile Full Moon Hike at Crystal Cove State Park. A park naturalist will lead hikers on this moderate to difficult loop trail with uneven terrain and a steep uphill climb, elevation gain of 600 ft. This hike is suitable for ages 10 and up. Hikers must wear sturdy shoes, bring water and a snack. Bug repellant is recommended. Please bring a red flashlight, but if you don’t have one, they will have plenty to share. Meet at the Ranger Station (PCH inland at stoplight School-State Park, follow the signs to the Ranger Station.) Registration is required, so sign up at https://letsgooutside.org.

Click on photo for a larger image

Embark on a Science Hike to explore the Parks geological and ecological systems

Explore the Cove Science Hikes, Fourth Saturday each month: July 27, August 24 and September 28 from 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Registration is required for this event. Take a hike with a Conservancy educator to explore Crystal Cove State Park’s geological and ecological systems. Explore the impacts and challenges of climate change including fire ecology, ecological restoration, coastal engineering and marine conservation, as well as native versus non-native species and their impact on natural communities and ecosystem functions. Registration is required for these events.

Click on photo for a larger image

Historic District Walking Tours take place the fourth Saturday of every month

Historic District Walking Tours, Fourth Saturday each month: July 27, August 24 and September 28 from 2-3 p.m. Historic District Walking Tours return to Crystal Cove State Park. During this 60-minute tour led by Conservancy educators and former cottage residents, participants will step back in time to explore the history of Crystal Cove and the Historic District’s rescue and restoration.

Click on photo for a larger image

Relax under the stars and enjoy Movies on the Beach

Movies on the Beach, Monthly: July 25, August 22 and September 19; click here for showtimes.

Grab your friends and family, blankets and beach chairs, and join Crystal Cove Conservancy for movie night under the stars. Check The Conservancy’s website for details including times and movie titles.

Cove Talks, Ongoing.

Cove Talk: A Conversation with Avi Garbow

Wednesday, Aug. 7 from 4:30-6:30 p.m.; click here for upcoming dates. Registration is required for these events.

The Conservancy’s “Cove Talks” aim to bring influential individuals working to change the world to Crystal Cove State Park, as they share a diverse collection of experiences and viewpoints. These talks are another step towards connecting the community to the natural world, while deepening their understanding of issues facing local parks, the coast and the planet. Registration is required for these events.

Grunion Run, Tuesday, Aug. 20. Click here for additional details. Registration is required for this event.

This one-night-only event will open your eyes to the world of the grunion. Join Conservancy and Park educators to learn about the grunion run phenomenon and the importance of coastal and ocean conservation, followed by a guided observation of the silvery fish as they emerge from the water to spawn. Registration is required for this event.

For more information about summer and fall programming at Crystl Cove and to register for upcoming programs, go here.

Open story in new window…


Cultural Arts: Music in the Park is in full swing, next concert July 21

Stage on Forest

Friday, July 19, 5:30-7:30 p.m. – Andrew Corradini

Saturday, July 20, 5:30-7:30 p.m. – Jodi Siegel

Sunday, July 21, 5-7 p.m. – Russell Long

Music in the Park

Every Sunday through Aug. 18, 5-7 p.m.

Bluebird Park, 772 Cress St.

Music in the Park is a free public concert series held Sunday evenings in July and August, at Bluebird Park. Concerts start at 5 p.m. Set-up is not permitted before 3 p.m. No dogs are allowed at Bluebird Park (LBMC 6.16.020). No smoking (LBMC 7.40.030). No display or sale of merchandise (LBMC 18.04.015). Low-seating beach chairs are encouraged. Alcohol is permitted for guests 21 or older, but must be accompanied by a full meal. Solicitation of any kind is not permitted at city events.

2024 CONCERT SCHEDULE

–July 21: The Shagwells (‘60s and ‘70s hits)

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of www.mickadamsandtheshagwells.com

Mick Adams and the Shagwells – July 21

–July 28: Upstream (Caribbean, reggae, calypso, steel drum)

–August 4: 133 Band

–August 11: Betamaxx (1980s cover)

–August 18: The Tina Turner Tribute featuring Debby Holiday (Tribute)

This program is funded by the lodging establishments and City of Laguna Beach.

For questions, contact Cultural Arts at 949.497.3311.

Temporary Art Installation

A ceramic mural titled Seagull Eclipse by local artist Jesse Bartels will be installed at the pocket park on Laguna Frontage Road near Woodland Drive mid-June through September 2024. This project has been made possible through a gift from the Wayne Peterson Fund of the Laguna Beach Community Foundation.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of City of Laguna Beach

“Seagull Eclipse” by Jess Bartels

Public Art Activation

Thursday, Aug. 1, 5-6 p.m.

Laguna Beach City Hall, 505 Forest Ave.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of City of Laguna Beach

Interactive presentation by OC Bird of Prey Center on August 1

The Arts Commission cordially invites you and your family to experience the new temporary public art installation, An Attempted Murder by artist Jack Champion, at City Hall and take part in an interactive presentation by the Orange County Bird of Prey Center. Engage with live animals and learn more about hawks and owls, and how to respect their Laguna Canyon habitats.

To learn more about the Orange County Bird of Prey Center, go to www.ocbpc.org.

This program is funded by the lodging establishments and City of Laguna Beach.

For questions, contact Cultural Arts at 949.497.3311.

Open story in new window…


Laguna Beach Master Community Calendar

The following are calendar links for regularly scheduled meetings and events in Laguna Beach:

City of Laguna Beach meetings & events calendar

www.lagunabeachcity.net

Laguna Beach Public Library – everything at the library calendar

www.ocpl.org/libraries/laguna-beach

Laguna Beach Unified School District news & events calendar

www.lbusd.org/calendar

Laguna Beach Chamber of Commerce community events calendar

www.lagunabeachchamber.org/events/calendar

Open story in new window…


LBBC 2024 Speaker Series features Bree Burgess Rosen on July 25

The Laguna Beach Business Club (LBBC) announced their July 25 speaker is Bree Burgess Rosen, creator of LAGUNATICS and founder of No Square Theatre. The LBBC holds monthly breakfast meetings starting at 7:30 a.m., hosting speakers that discuss topics valuable to achieving personal and professional success.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of LBBC

Bree Burgess Rosen will be the LBBC guest speaker on July 25

Rosen will give a sneak-peak into this year’s musical, Roast of the Coast and will share insights into three decades of silly social commentary.

Rosen has more than five decades of experience in the performing arts as a professional performer, writer, producer, director and educator. She is a member of the Actors’ Equity Association and the Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. She is a former member of the Laguna Playhouse Board of Directors, and the creator and writer of 30 years of LAGUNATICS, (Winner Arts Program of the Year 2022). Rosen serves as the board president and founding artistic director of No Square Theatre, Laguna’s only community theater, now in its 25th year.

From 2006-2019, Rosen worked as writer, director, producer and as a performer, with Pacific Symphony’s “Class Act” and their Family Musical Mornings concert series. She has been honored as both the State of Nevada’s Humanitarian of the Year, and as a “Point of Light” by President George H. Bush for her work as co-founder and past president of Golden Rainbow of Nevada, a nonprofit organization providing low-cost housing for persons with AIDS. For her on-going work in Laguna Beach, Rosen has been recognized as Woman of the Year, Citizen of the Year, one of Laguna’s Most Influential People and as Orange County’s 2013 Theater Woman of the Year. In 2021, Laguna Beach Arts Alliance celebrated her Lifetime Achievement for the many contributions she has made to the arts community and city of Laguna Beach.

The LBBC is a group of local business professionals and entrepreneurs that meet monthly to discuss current events, business opportunities and share insights within the context of their community, and lives with the goal of building and maintaining relationships with local professionals and businesses that they can proudly recommend to clients and friends. LBBC also supports their community by providing and participating in community services and/or events that benefit the citizens of Laguna Beach.

Club meetings begin with a buffet breakfast and brief networking roundtable. Meetings are hosted at Nirvana Kitchen + Pantry, 303 Broadway St., # 101, Laguna Beach. Non-members are welcome. The non-member guest fee is $30 payable by Venmo or cash/check payable to the Laguna Beach Business Club the day of the meeting. Space is limited. Guests be sure you receive RSVP confirmation. For more information about the LBBC or to register to attend the meeting, either visit their website at www.lagunabeachbusinessclub.com, or email them at info@lagunabeachbusinessclub.com.

Open story in new window…


Laguna Beach FC launches LBFC Junior Academy program

Local community nonprofit, Laguna Beach FC, is launching a recreational youth soccer program starting this fall. The LBFC Junior Academy program will be a seasonal program with games played in Laguna Beach as an introduction to the game of soccer. The 10-week fall session will offer once a week team training and games on Saturdays run by LBFC trained coaches. The aim of the Junior Academy program is skill development, competition and most importantly, having fun.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Laguna Beach FC

The program starts August 26, register by August 20

Laguna Beach FC was founded by local coach, educator and former pro, Mike Thomas, along with his brother, CIF winning coach Andy Thomas and Laguna Beach residents Lucie Martlin, Chris Boyd and Andrea Lalvani. LBFC has 14 club teams, ages 8 through 18, who train in Laguna Beach year-round and compete in top Southern California leagues. Club highlights include two State Cup Championships (2023 B10 and G05), multiple SOCAL Division Champion teams and a semi-pro team that is under development. Club coaches include Founders Mike Thomas and Andy Thomas; Max Woodruff, a former pro player with Bury FC and Sam Yeoman who coach the LBHS girls program; award-winning college players Brianna Woodruff (Biola University) and Erik Haug (George Washington University), and local educator and former LBHS player Collin Macdonald. LBFC’s club coaching staff will share their expertise with the new Junior Academy coaches.

The LBFC Junior Academy program starts August 26 with games from September 7 through November 9. Register by August 20. It is open to boys and girls born in 2013 through 2018. An additional weekly recreational group training program will be offered for boys and girls born in 2019 and 2020. For more details, click here.

Open story in new window…


This is as close as we can come to actually singing to our readers on their birthdays!

We’d love to include yours – and/or your children’s birthdays here.

Just email to: editor@stunewslaguna.com

Celebrate and enjoy your birthday!

July 16: Cyrus Polk, Ellen Girardeau Kempler, Michael Marzo, Paula Arnold

July 17: Brad Clancy, Chase Johnson, Stephanie Hamilton, Stephen Bryer

July 18: Chris Krach-Bastian, Christine Tokarz, Dion Strombotne, Drew Stevens, Elliot West, Gary Arthur, George West, Gordon Cowan, Joseph Caputo, Michael Coppolino, Nancy Wilhelm, PJ Elbing

July 19: Dara Sandrini, Daryle Lynn Cornelison, Nolan Del Toro, Randy Ray, Tim Valley

July 20: Brett Dunstan, Devon Dick, Helen Hayden, Sharon McMillion

July 21: Anna Cancelleri, Brandy Williams, Evan Spiegel, Ken Konkel

July 22: Christine Bertlshofer Lacagnina, Dani Bauter, David Koontz, Isabella Lyons, Karen Kanner, Michelle Bentcliff

Open story in new window…


Meet Pet of the Week Cher

 This schnauzer mix may not have won a Grammy, but Cher is sure to make your heart sing when she enters your home. She’ll also bring a smile to your face. This spayed female is about 5 years old and is good with people. She also likes some dogs – she is a bit picky about which ones, but if she approves then it’s a nice friendship. Cher is fully housebroken and will make a great companion.

Nancy Goodwin, shelter director, is hoping to have Cher adopted as soon as possible.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of the Laguna Beach Animal Shelter

Cher is a bit picky about which other dogs she likes, but she’ll be a welcome addition to your home

The Laguna Beach Animal Shelter adoption procedures are designed to make sure that both the potential family and the animal adopted are in the very best situation possible. Due to their approach to adoption, their return rate is 5% as compared to the national return rate of 50%.

The Laguna Beach Animal Shelter is located at 20612 Laguna Canyon Road. Call 949.497.3552, or go to the website for information on adoption procedures, www.puplagunabeach.org/our-pets.php.

Open story in new window…


Platters get splattered at Festival of Arts on Membership Day, July 28

Art lovers are invited to a Platter Painting Demonstration on Sunday, July 28, 12-3 p.m. in the Art Center at Festival of Arts. Visitors will watch as 12 Festival exhibitors try their hand at painting personal designs on giant platters using ceramic glazes.

Click photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of The Artists Fund

Bruce Burr and visitor Gina Mead

Visitors may mingle about the gathering, watch the progress and interact with the artists as they are working. “Designs are unique to each artist, and often compare to work in their exhibit booth,” said Program Coordinator Mike Tauber. “So, a piece by wildlife illustrator Ray Brown will look completely different than one by printmaker Vinita Voogd. It’s fascinating to see the variety!” he said. Additional artists include Bruce Burr, Kate Cohen, Toni Danchik, Sharon Jackman, Yuri Kuznetsov, Pil Ho Lee, Sian Poeschl, Anthony Salvo, Karin Worden and more.

Click photo for a larger image

Sonata Platter by Vinita Voogd

The event is part of the greater Membership Day activities at Festival of Arts. Miskey Mountain Boys will perform live bluegrass on stage, and all who buy from the Art-To-Go fundraising sale will enjoy savings of 20% off all items. The finished fired platters will be unveiled and auctioned alongside Art-To-Go on Sunday, Aug. 25, 6-8 p.m. To receive “sneak preview” photos and a reminder, subscribe to The Artists Fund eNewsletter by clicking here, or email info@theartistsfund-foa.org.

Karin Worden (seated) and volunteer Michelle McCormick

Proceeds from Art-To-Go and platter sales support The Artists Fund at Festival of Arts. The platters event is sponsored by Laguna Clay Company. For more information, visit www.theartistsfund-foa.org, or call 949.612.1949. Festival of Arts and Pageant of the Masters is located at 650 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach.

Open story in new window…


Catmosphere Laguna Foundation announces adoption event at Gelson’s Rancho Mission Viejo on July 20

On Saturday, July 20 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Catmosphere Laguna cats and kittens will be featured for adoption at their new location at Gelson’s Rancho Mission Viejo Store, 30731 Gateway Plaza, Rancho Mission Viejo.

Catmosphere Laguna Foundation introduced Orange County’s first Cat Café & Lounge. Catmosphere Laguna Rescue is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit feline rescue which serves Laguna Beach and the surrounding communities every day of the week dedicated to finding forever homes for homeless, relinquished, abandoned and special-needs cats and kittens.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of Catmosphere Laguna Foundation

Adoption event on July 20 at Gelson’s Rancho Mission Viejo

Laguna Beach has long been known and loved for its artistic community and embrace of nature in all its forms. Catmosphere Laguna Foundation enhances and strengthens that reputation in its mission to prevent cruelty to animals by rescuing, fostering and assisting in public adoptions, and awareness of the plight of homeless felines. Their adoption events are fun for the whole family with snacks and giveaways for all – volunteer opportunities are available.

Click on photo for a larger image

Happy adopters

Save the Date for these future adoption events, continuing monthly throughout 2024:

Saturday, July 27 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Pet Palooza, Laguna Niguel Regional Park, 28241 La Paz Rd., Laguna Niguel – Volunteers!

Laguna Beach Animal Shelter, 20612 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach

~Saturday, Aug. 17

~Saturday, Oct. 5 (Love Laguna Beach Day)

Saturday, Oct. 26 (Halloween Pawty) and year-end holiday events

Brand New September Event

~Saturday Sept. 7 from 9 a.m.-12 p.m., Aliso Viejo Furry Friends Pet Fair, 100 Park Ave., Aliso Viejo – Volunteers!

For more details, contact Catmosphere Laguna Foundation at 949.619.MEOW (6369), or teamfeline@catmospherelaguna.com.

Open story in new window…


Tickets are going fast for Lyric Opera OC’s upcoming event at the Susi Q

Lyric Opera OC will offer another outstanding evening’s entertainment at the Susi Q on July 30 between 4 and 6 p.m., following the sold-out success of the previous series. A nominal administrative fee of $5 secures a seat at the popular event, which this time focuses on Opera in America. Tickets are going fast!

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos courtesy of Lyric Opera

Don’t miss the concert on July 30

Artistic Director & President of Lyric Opera OC Diana Farrell explained that the performance will trace the evolution of opera in America from Puccini – several of whose operas premiered in the U.S. – to the Great American Songbook, featuring compositions by Gershwin, Porter, and Rodgers & Hammerstein.

“The presentation will trace the classical voices of the mid-20th century, including composers like Bernstein and Menotti, and move on to Broadway crossovers like Stephen Sondheim,” Farrell said. “We’ll also offer an overview of opera in the 21st century. And we have wonderful news to share about our Carnegie Hall debut!”

Click on photo for a larger image

Audience will be treated to an overview of opera in the 21st century

Lyric Opera OC’s operas are presented in a concert format, with minimal to no staging or costumes, but with piano accompaniment. English supertitles appear on large flatscreen TVs to aid the audience in following the story behind the opera.

“Susi Q has a long-standing reputation for community engagement with the arts, and their audiences are so receptive and supportive of our singers. They’ve proven they love our intimate performances!” Farrell said.

The performance takes place at the Susi Q, located at 380 Third St., Laguna Beach. Sign up here.

The Susi Q offers a wide range of educational and fun programs, classes and clubs for older adults – though all ages are welcome. The Susi Q’s Care Management Department provides free consultation, education and practical resources for vulnerable seniors, enabling them to stay safe, informed and independent. For more information on The Susi Q, the portal to access the best of Laguna’s community resources, visit www.thesusiq.org.

Open story in new window…


Free workshop at the Susi Q will help you take even better photos with your smartphone

Smartphones have provided the ability for even the most clueless among us to share at least passable, and sometimes great photos of our vacations, pets and families – if only because we get lucky with a few terrific shots among the gazillion that we take on each occasion.

Click on photo for a larger image

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Mary Hurlbut, photographer

But maybe it’s time to hone those skills to reliably end up with pics that stun our Facebook friends and Instagram audiences, not to mention our real-life friends and loved ones. Time also to learn what all those settings on our phone actually accomplish, perhaps?

Click on photo for a larger image

Calling all parents and grandparents! You too can take a photo as wonderful as Mary’s

Susi Q is here for you. The nonprofit invites all ages to attend a free workshop on taking sensational smartphone photos, led by talented professional photographer Mary Hurlbut. The workshop will take place on Tuesday, July 23 between 1 and 2:30 p.m. at the Susi Q Center, 380 Third St. Parking is free.

“I’ll provide a brief intro into the art of photography, along with tips and tricks to help you make the most of your IPhone or Android camera,” Hurlbut said. “As just one example, I suggest thinking through what you want to accomplish with your shot, such as how much of the subject you want in the picture. Take a lot of photos to experiment with composition.”

Click on photo for a larger image

Know when the light is right for colors to pop

Along with many other tips, Hurlbut will explain the “rule of three” and the best times of day to take beach and family photos. She’ll also briefly address editing and uploading photos.

Hurlbut is known in Laguna Beach for her exceptional portraiture, remarkable candid shots and deep understanding of light and composition. Join her workshop to take your photos to a whole new level. Those kids and grandkids won’t stay young forever – capture their energy and quirks now in pictures that will last a lifetime.

Click on photo for a larger image

Lighting and composition make all the difference

Sign up for Hurlbut’s class here or visit www.thesusiq.org and click on classes and registration, or call Christine Brewer at 949.715.8105. Space is limited, so sign up soon.

There’s always something new at the Susi Q. Visit www.thesusiq.org to review the many ongoing programs that Susi Q offers, from ukulele lessons, to standing yoga, to bridge and mahjong classes, not to mention support groups and clubs for special interest groups ranging from genealogy to current affairs to books and so much more. The Susi Q’s Care Management Department (now the Dorene Cares Office) provides free consultation, education and practical resources for vulnerable seniors, enabling them to stay safe, informed and independent.

To sign up for regular activity updates, visit www.thesusiq.org and scroll down to the bottom of the page to enter your email address.

Open story in new window…


Laguna Live! presents Trio Mizmor at Live! at the Museum on August 4

Join Laguna Live! at the Laguna Art Museum for Trio Mizmor, a beautiful blend of violin, viola and cello, sure to delight the senses. The trio will perform on Sunday, Aug. 4 at 1 p.m.

Click on photo for a larger image

Courtesy of Laguna Live!

Trio Mizmor: (L-R) Limor Toren, Nicholaus Yee and Alicja Blanquart

As a violinist, Limor Toren enjoys an active career, performing as soloist, chamber musician and symphony player. She has collaborated with Mstislav Rostropovich, Natalia Gutman, Evgeny Kisin, Barbara Hendricks, Sara Chang, Midori, Emanuel Ax and Isaac Stern. Toren has also performed under the baton of Anjey Brusilov, Sergio Comissiona, Jacek Kaspszyk, Kurt Mazur, Zubin Mehta and Kurt Sanderling.

Violist Nicholaus Yee completed his doctoral studies at the Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California, where he was the teaching assistant to Dr. Pamela Goldsmith and Professor Donald McInnes and attended as a full fellowship recipient. In addition to his viola studies, he is trained as an instrumental conductor, early music specialist and music educator, topics he studied as part of the rigorous and multi-faceted program at USC.

Alicja Blanquart, cello, was born in Warsaw, Poland into a family of musicians. Blanquart first came to the United States in 1987 to continue her music education and she was awarded scholarships for both her graduate and post-graduate studies. She graduated from Eastman School of Music from a studio of Prof. Steven Doane and earned her master’s degree in Cello Performance at the University of Southern California from the studio of Prof. Eleonore Schoenfeld. As an avid chamber musician, Blanquart is the founder of a Summer Chamber Music cello program for advanced students.

Live! at the Museum is presented in partnership with Laguna Beach Live!

Laguna Live! concerts are partially funded by the lodging establishments and City of Laguna Beach.

Advance tickets recommended.

Laguna Art Museum members & Laguna Beach Live! Members: Free. Non-members: $14 per person. For tickets, click here.

Open story in new window…


Taking it to the streets

Click on photo for a larger image

Photo by Mary Hurlbut

Keeping us safe

Open story in new window…

Compiled by Suzie Harrison

Police Beat derives from information in the daily police and arrest logs published on the City of Laguna Beach’s website and required under CA Government Code Section 6254 (f). Additional information is obtained through communication with the Laguna Beach Police Department’s Public Information Officer.

Information in the logs is deemed reliable and Stu News Laguna is not responsible for any mistakes made available as public record by the Laguna Beach Police Department.

Any person arrested is innocent until found guilty in a court of law.


Send this to a friend