Print

Karen Polek: a medicine woman for the new age

By MAGGI HENRIKSON

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Karen Polek is a healer. It has been her life’s mission since she can remember.

Karen Polek

“I’ve always been a sensitive person,” she says. “It’s a gift from God, really.” She felt it in her hands especially. “When I was very young, I remember my hands moving. They were highly sensitive.”

Polek used those hands to help her father, a farmer, pick the tobacco they grew in western Connecticut. Those were the times when kids would play in the cornfields as the crop dusters flew overhead. She remembers building things with the empty DDT pesticide cans. And those hands turned brown from the tar on the tobacco leaves.

Her mother, a devout Catholic, did not appreciate her young daughter’s special sensitivities. Being the good daughter, Karen conformed to her conservative environment. “I learned to stifle my energy,” she said.

She went down the expected path, pursuing a marketing career in a traditional corporate environment, and married a man working for the same company. The moved to Laguna in 1975, while she worked for Combustion Engineering, and her husband, an engineer, worked on the San Onofre power plant. Her mainstream world started to spin in a different orbit after their divorce. 

Past and present

Polek became more interested in the spiritual aspects of life: meditation, therapy, healthy eating, and exercise. “Your answers are within,” she says. “It’s just a matter of getting quiet and listening.” She slowed down, and paid attention.

“When the student is ready, the teacher appears,” she says. Her “teacher” appeared in the late 1980’s, when she began to study holistic health practices. Finally it all made sense to Polek as she was able to grow and utilize her sensitivities.

Click on photo for a larger image

 

The healing office

She studied at ISPB College in San Diego learning massage and other techniques as a health practitioner. After a thousand hours of training she opened her holistic practice in 1988. She continued to learn physical and emotional therapies, and one day a special teacher found her and guided her to CranioSacral Therapy.

The Cranium and the Sacrum

CranioSacral is a therapy developed by an osteopathic physician, Dr. John Upledger, in the early 1980’s as a way to relieve pain and dysfunction in the body, and improve whole-body health and performance. Practitioners use touch to evaluate the flow of the central nervous system.

“The beauty of CranioSacral Therapy is that it’s a gentle and self-corrective method,” said Polek. “It balances the neurological system; brain, bones, spinal fluids, and everything in between.” 

She was trained at the Upledger Institute about how to listen with her hands. As the spinal fluid is created in the cranium, it then sends forth into the body nutrients that protect and cleanse the neurological system. 

“There’s a flow of the cerebral spinal fluid,” she said. “I was taught to feel it and listen to the cranial movements of the bones as it goes back and forth.”

The body and the mind 

A part of CranioSacral work is what they call SomatoEmotional Release. “Most of our physical problems are a result of an emotion,” says Polek. “We guide the person to dialog with their body.” 

That can lead to an emotional release. 

“There are ‘Aha’ moments, maybe laughing hysterically, crying, or pain. It’s tapping into a memory,” she says. “The body stores memory in its tissues. The more your cerebral spinal fluid is balanced and flowing, the emotions can come out, and the body can get rid of it and heal.”

At her office in Laguna, and another office shared with a partner in cognitive therapy, Laurie Brodeske, PhD (Care Psychological Services), in Santa Ana, Polek sees a wide range of patients, including cancer patients, pregnant moms, newborns, and the elderly. About half of her patients are special needs children. 

There’s a thing called Reactive Attachment Disorder in cases where the child may have experienced abuse in utero such as drugs or alcohol, or children of sexual abuse. Polek works with many of these children once placed in foster care. 

“There’s such a trust issue with them, it’s hard to attach to parents,” Polek said. “Guilt can prevent the attachment, so they self-sabotage. 

“Kids can’t always decipher what their emotions are,” she continued. “I work with a cognitive therapist at the same time. I can feel when their cranial rhythm goes out, and that’s when we know to guide them into their feelings [with cognitive therapy].” 

Illness and Health

The best success story Polek shared was about a mom at Camp Pendleton. Her husband had been deployed so she was alone when she gave birth to their first child. The attending doctor immediately noticed a problem with the formation of the bones in the newborn baby’s skull, and he referred the mom to a specialist to perform a dangerous, yet necessary surgery.

Before that could happen, Polek was brought in. She did two cranial release sessions with the infant. When the mom took her baby to the specialist, he simply said, “Why are you here? There’s nothing wrong.” The bones had been perfectly re-aligned.

Dolphins and Therapy

If there’s one thing Karen Polek likes more than healing people, it’s dolphins. And even better than that, dolphins that heal.

Click on photo for a larger image

 

With her unique sensitivity, Polek can feel the dolphin’s energy. “You can see the sonar energy as they scan your body,” she says. “You can feel their energy on their rostrum.”

At one time, Polek was helping a patient who had been in a car accident, which severely damaged his hip. Polek was holding the man as he floated in water amongst dolphins in a natural lagoon. She watched as one dolphin swam to the far side of the lagoon. The next thing she knew, that dolphin came at lightening speed and bumped her away from the man. The dolphin stayed, and then gently rested its nose (rostrum) directly on the man’s hip.

She found that out at the Upledger Dolphin-Assisted Therapy clinic in the Bahamas. Polek often attends sessions there, to work with these intelligent and sensitive mammals. The dolphins provide their own form of healing within a gated lagoon during four-day intensive programs, which allow therapists and patients alike to experience the dolphin’s natural ability to sense and nurture humans.

The best of Karen Polek’s life has been guided by sensitivity, caring and feeling. The experience is in her hands and in her heart.