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Laguna Beach


Doug Miller: from the other side of the lens

By MAGGI HENRIKSON

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

He has a mind for facts and figures, and a library of journals to back it up. Doug Miller has kept count of every photo he’s ever taken: who, when, and where. The number of individuals hover around 40,000. I shouldn’t say hover, because the man knows the figures – the exact figures. Just ask him. He also has taken some 350,000 spontaneous photos from the streets of Laguna Beach.

He tracks the names and dates, and piles the journals in his filled-to-the-brim compact studio, in his own particular style of order. 

“Over there are my albums,” he points out. “And that stack is ordered by date.” I look around the stool I’m seated on and mentally take note, lest I knock over the perfectly chronological journals, which may require several days worth of re-cataloguing.

He Found his Vice

I remember the first time Doug Miller captured my children with his camera. “Oh yeah,” he says. “I’ve done a lot at Top of the World.” And Boo Blast, and Sawdust, and the Patriots Day Parade… and along his daily walks from his artist’s studio on South Coast Hwy into the downtown area.

Doug Miller

He is a walker. “I never got my license,” he explains, even though he drove his VW bus until it died. Since then he has opted for foot travel, and that has put him direct line of sight with just about everyone in Laguna. Everything fascinates him with his lens.

“Everyone else has vices,” he says. “Mine is film: I’m addicted.”

As his portfolio of slides and stacks of journals grew, Miller has become an incidental archivist. At many points he has documented moments, people and places of historic significance, like the morning just before the devastating fire in 1993. 

“I was down on the boardwalk that morning. When it started, I was out in the canyon,” he recalls. “The next day, I walked from our house down the beach to downtown. I got right on through. I walked up Park Avenue to Skyline, taking pictures as I went.”

He’s scanning and posting from his photo albums on Facebook these days to the tune of some 1,800 albums. At 30 – 40 photos per album, well, do the math. Suffice to say, there are a lot of photos to look at on Facebook for many a rainy day. “I’ll post it, and it’s fine,” he says. “I don’t copyright my pictures.”

It may be hard to get potential patrons to cross the busy coastal highway, but Miller welcomes many strollers-by every day into his studio, nonetheless. You’ll find him amongst his stacks, working on a painting, or looking through the magnifying lens at sheets of slides, or cataloging his many photo albums, but he’ll shout out, “Hi! Come on in!”

So, take the opportunity. Pull up a step stool, and allow his stories to unfold – of all the years and all the visual references this one-man history book has documented in and around Laguna.

The Early Days

Miller was a lanky teenager in Long Beach when he upped for the Navy. He served as a radarman. The best part of that experience was being away on leave, aka “liberty”, when he could visit his Aunt and Grandma in Laguna Beach. “My grandma had a house on Flora Street,” he said. “It was great here, much more fun than Long Beach.” 

Meanwhile he got hooked on photography with a Minolta he bought in Hong Kong. He started out doing photography for the Navy, including the ship’s crews. “I took to it like a duck to water,” he recalls. “I spent all my money on film.” 

After the Navy, he moved into the home of his friend Barbara Stuart in Laguna. He lived there for eight years during which time he met the love of his life, Becky. They were married in 1979, and briefly moved to her hometown of Jackson Hole, where they lived in a teepee. When Barbara passed away in 1998, Doug and Becky were able to purchase from her children the family property where the studio and home still reside. 

The two buildings were from the early 1930’s, and the one that is now his studio was pretty rickety. It took lots of mechanical ratcheting with a bunch of friends to keep the place from falling apart. Go visit the studio today and you’ll see where the roof-beams were created and the little shack that stood beside a two-lane dirt road has morphed into an art studio along Coast Highway. 

The Miller’s charming and authentic cottage is just behind the studio, and it’s where they raised their two sons, Jesse and Josiah.

The Sawdust Calling

Something just resonated between Miller’s brain and the lens. He took that passion post-Navy, and entered into his first years at the Sawdust Festival.

His initial works were photographic, and then he branched into painting.

“I did photography at the Sawdust, but that didn’t sell much. I had some dreadful oil paintings in 1971, but I managed to sell a few,” he admits. Selling improved, as did his painting technique.

In his Sawdust booth, Miller always has a train set running. “I pick the spot so I can have my HO train there,” he said. “Now all the kids come to see the train. A kid at heart, he also gives out toys. “People bring me bags of toys, or I get them from the thrift store. If I find something neat I put it in the window at the studio.”

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The paintings he did then have progressed into today’s exhibits: Laguna and its environs. For the most part, they are miniature, colorful, floral aspects of nature and coastlines. Miller has managed to follow the advice of a mentor who told him to do a painting every day.  And all the paintings are photographed and catalogued, of course.

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“I can look something up,” he explains as he peruses a photo journal. “I go through my phases.” His phase now is focused on scenes of Three Arch Bay.

And then there are some paintings that combine the almost mathematical cataloging that colors Miller’s mind. Of these, he has a series of large works that are his “birthday series”. Every year at his booth, Miller invites people to tell him their birthdays. The names and birthdays are interlocked into one painting. Since the 1980’s he’s done 14 birthday paintings, which include some 20,000 people.

Then there’s the calculation for the exact spot to post the birthday information with ink into one of four quadrants on the canvas. It goes something like this, if your birthday is October 4: Ten plus four equals fourteen, then that number is divided by four, because there are four corners in a painting. You with me so far? 

He has numbers associated with corners, so that the ten inches by four inches is divided by four, and the remainder is two… Voila! Somehow this works out as the number two corner, with ten inches over, and four inches down. My head hurts already!

“Somebody said it’s a Greek formula,” Miller says. “I don’t know. I’m not a mathematician. But I know where to find people’s names!” Very handy, because people will return to his booth, and ask the existential question – “Where am I?”

I particularly like his “Where they did it” paintings. Close your eyes if this is too much for your sensibilities, but it is as it says – Where did you “do it?” Yes, that “it”!

Miller asks people for their most intimate secret: where did you do it? He wants to know. “Not the house. Not the honeymoon,” he implores. He’s looking for something more exotic. “Surprisingly, it’s mostly females who tell me.” 

Upon the canvas he inscribes the itsy-bitsy calligraphy of names – and places. The most intriguing? (You had to ask!). The Pirates of the Caribbean ride at Disneyland! “The staff applauded, because it was on video,” Miller shared. “It was the last ride of the day.” Good stuff.

The Other Siren Call

The Sunday-side of Doug Miller is an accomplished violinist. He’s played regularly for church services at both Laguna Presbyterian and the Neighborhood Congregational Church for ten years now. He occasionally likes to improvise. “I’ll relax, and hit a high note, and make everyone’s hair stand up,” he jokes.

He’s been playing since he was nine years old. “My grandmother got me into the free music program in Long Beach,” he explains. “The choice was either flute or violin.” Violin won out. He continued, and found that he had a knack for remembering melodies and for finding a way to fit in amongst other instrumentalists. 

When he was in the Navy, he was pretty much forced into a talent show. “I found I could play with anyone off the top of my head,” he says. 

These days, Miller is really excited about his band, Moon Police, and their first CD, which is coming out in April. “It’s all original, and written by us,” he said. He describes the Moon Police sound as “not a bunch of rock and roll junk…some songs sound like they’re out of a cathedral, some are in French. It’s pretty.”

Taking the lead is their 17 year-old keyboardist and singer, Grace Freeman. “She’s going to make a mark on the music world,” Miller tells us. “She’s incredible. Impeccable.

“I’m of a different ilk,” he continued. “They’re a bunch of kids! I’m playing with the best in this band. The music will speak for itself …being appreciated is where it’s at.”

The band gets together to practice once a week, and they also have a concert coming up at the Neighborhood Congregational Church on April 18.

The Whole of the Parts

For Miller, there is a connection and order to the arts for which he holds so much passion. Whether it’s from behind his lens, with paintbrush atop his canvas, with chin on the violin, or within his analytical system of organization. All of his senses play a part in the composition. 

“I can taste colors in my head,” he says poetically. “I can taste music too. What doesn’t work doesn’t taste good. I see greens in relation to blues. Too much purple is too sweet.”

Music inspires other sensations. “Music is a feeling of life, from a place that’s inspiring,” he says. “It’s like someone visits you when you play well.”

Putting all the pieces together, Miller expresses the feeling of completion.

“It’s all composition. It’s a strange perfection – music and art. It’s all the same,” he says. “And every so often there’s a breakthrough.”

Here’s to those moments. 

Thank you for the perspective from your life’s lens Doug Miller!


Robin Fuld: Teaching the business of art at LCAD

BY: SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by: Mary Hurlbut

As Director of Career Services at the Laguna College of Art and Design (LCAD), Robin Fuld is charged with “empowering our artists in the business of art,” as she describes it.  Her own career path, a brilliant example of resourcefulness, tenacity, serendipity and, above all else, a love of art, makes her ideally suited for the career she has now.

“I grew up on Cape Cod.  It’s an art town and we had an incredible art program in high school.  I didn’t have the passion or discipline to keep creating, but I developed a love of art,” Fuld explains.  However, she pursued a degree in education, not art, from the University of Massachusetts.  But before she could get too far away from her passion, fate stepped in.

Director of Career Service and Instructor of Professional Studies at LCAD

A lucky ticket launches a career

“My friends found out that Logan Airport was having a raffle.  If you bought a ticket (for $1.69) and won you had to get on a plane that day and go wherever you were going.  So we all went down there at 5 a.m.  My sister took me and bought a ticket to better my chances.  My sister won and gave me her ticket. It all happened so fast.  I went to Vail, CO because that’s the only place where I knew someone, and I wanted to go for the whole summer, not just a week somewhere,” explains Fuld.  

Not only did the $1.69 spent on that raffle ticket provide a change of scenery, it also launched her career, though she was unaware of that fact at the time.  “An art gallery had a ‘Help Wanted’ sign in the window.  I never thought…but I got that job because of my love of art – and because I’m a people person,” she says.  After just a few minutes with Fuld both of these qualities are very apparent. 

From Cape Cod to Vail to Rodeo Drive to…

“After four years, one of the artists said I should check out LA.  So I went. I was on Rodeo Drive and went into a gallery there and they hired me on the spot.  The woman who hired me said I was ‘refreshing’, and that she’d protect me from the ‘vultures’ – which she did,” says Fuld with a laugh.  “I learned so much.  I sawso much. Unfortunately, after a year, the gallery closed due to ‘questionable activity’ – like fraud and money laundering. But that’s another story,” she says with enthusiasm. 

From LA, Fuld used her networking skills and worked in galleries in Palm Desert, Brea and Irvine.  Always, it seems, people she had worked with along the way wanted the chance to work with her again.  Finally, however, after the owners closed the Irvine gallery, despite the fact that it was doing well financially, Fuld decided to work for herself, starting her own art consulting business.  This was during the recession of the early ’90’s. 

“So many galleries had closed.  I approached one, Starry Sheets, in Irvine.  They specialized in California Regionalism – historic work.  I asked if they had space.  I told them I’d bring my clients and introduce them to the work in the gallery while representing other artists. They thought that was a great idea.  I stayed there for a couple of years until they downsized.  It was great.”

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Laguna Beach is “where you should be living.”

Finally, a collector/friend from the Rodeo gallery days “took me to Laguna Beach and said ‘this is where you should be living.’  It was she who introduced me to Laguna.”  After deciding that working from a home/office was not right for her, Fuld “started approaching galleries in Laguna and seeing if they needed help,” she explains.  She met an artist who had a temporary space in Irvine and eventually helped him open a gallery in Laguna while still retaining her own consulting business.  

“That’s what got me back in Laguna full time,” she says.  In 1995, Fuld was visiting a gallery to show them one of her artists.  They told her that a woman had just stopped in and mentioned she wanted to open a gallery in the space next door.  Fuld says they commanded her to, “‘Run after her!’ so I did.”

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Painting by a former LCAD student and Russian Impressionism from J. Kamin

Russian Impressionism comes to the west coast

Her pursuit turned into J. Kamin Fine Art.  “Jackie” (the ‘J’ in ‘J. Kamin’) discovered Russian Impressionism at the International Film Expo,” explains Fuld.  We brought it to the west coast.  It was awesome! It is important work, hidden from the world until that time,” explains Fuld who has two large pieces hanging on the walls of her office at LCAD.

A fortuitous teaching position at LCAD

During that time Fuld joined the Art Walk Board and that introduced her to a lot of non-profits in town. “I realized my artistic matchmaking skills,” she says laughing.  Then, as happens with Fuld, her past reached out to her.  

“The woman I worked for in Vail and again in Irvine was teaching a class at LCAD called ‘Professional Studies for the Fine Artist’.  She was pregnant and asked me if I’d take over teaching her class.  I said, ‘yes’.  Around the same time, my clients had asked me to be on the Collector’s Choice Committee for the school, which is their big fundraiser.  That got me more involved with the College. Then the rent doubled on the gallery space so Jackie and I decided it was time for a change.  

“She went into teaching and I applied to LCAD.  I had that network because I was already teaching there.  They asked if I could do what I did for all majors.  And that’s how I got here.”  Fuld has been the Director of Career Services at LCAD for the last eight years, and has taught her course for 12.

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LCAD students are in demand in all majors

In demand students create welcome challenges

“Treat your art career as the business that it is. Have a plan.”  

That is Fuld’s mandate for her students.  And it seems to be working.  LCAD’s employment statistics are above the national average, according to Fuld.  “I don’t believe in the myth of the starving artist,” she says slyly. “Our students are in demand.  That’s a wonderful challenge to have,” she says. 

From Cape Cod to Laguna Beach, Fuld’s understanding of “the business of art” – as well as her ability to bring people together – is exemplified by the longevity of her own career.  “My B.A. is in Education.  I was running away from it and now that’s all I do!” she says with her signature good humor.  

And that is something her students are undoubtedly grateful for.


Sid Fanarof: a local trendsetter on a global scale

By MAGGI HENRIKSON

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

If it’s Saturday morning, you’ll likely find him treasure hunting around Laguna’s garage sales. The rest of the week, he’s more apt to be found checking in on his zpizzas. Meet Sid Fanarof, the guy ahead of the curve. The guy who can sense a trend on the horizon, catch it and run with it.

Sid Fanarof

I met with Fanarof between his trip to the annual pizza convention in Las Vegas and a fun trip with Laguna friends to a wedding in San Francisco. He travels a lot, yet is very grounded in life in Laguna with family and loved ones nearby. Every Tuesday he and his wife of 30 years, Claire, host family dinners for anywhere from 10 – 20 people. And, no, it’s not pizza; they both love to cook.

The Fanarof family includes each of their children (“We were ‘The Brady Bunch’,” says Claire), three of the four living in town, and now six grandchildren. Getting ready for Tuesday night’s dinner includes lots of helping hands. 

“My favorite is a taco buffet,” Sid says. “I do it with grass-fed beef on the grill, I roast potatoes, and make burnt salsa and guacamole.” Sounds good, and knowing Fanarof’s big success with zpizza with its relaxed-yet-gourmet concept, I know the big Tuesday dinners must be unique, organic, and delicious.

The Z Concept 

Fanarof started zpizza in Laguna, and now it’s grown to an international scale. There are zpizzas in 15 US States, Korea, Vietnam, Saudi Arabia, and Dubai. It’s a concept restaurant that was ahead of its time when he founded it, with organic and gluten-free crust options, as well as carefully sourced and health-conscious ingredients. Sid tells us that the concept is catching on all over, even in places you wouldn’t think would be on the California wave of dietary trends. 

“In Korea they’re even more health conscious than we are,” he says.

Around the globe there’s a hankering for good pizza. Sid Fanarof has the last laugh, “I’m like the Colonel Sanders of pizza.” 

He’s been the man ahead of that trend for more than 30 years now, and he’s proud of the family that has been cultivated by this locally grown business. “I have wonderful employees who have worked for me for thirty years,” he said. “Now their children are working for me!”

Photo by Maggi

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One of the unique trends that Fanarof anticipated and rode with was the gluten-free diet. His own backstory is that he was gluten intolerant, and decided to make some of those options available at zpizza about six years ago. This year he noted at the pizza convention that about 20% of the exhibitors were promoting gluten-free products. 

zpizza is also a fun place. “We like doing build-your-own pizza events,” Fanarof tells us. “We’ll do team cooking, and make it a special place for birthday parties.” They’ve got a big, long red table (20 feet long) that’s the favorite party spot. Additionally, zpizza has been making Friendship Shelter residents happy for 10 years by providing pizza every first Sunday of the month.

The funny thing is, Sid Fanarof was never a fan of pizza. 

“I never loved pizza!” he says. “I really wanted to do Mexican food, and my partner wanted to do French.” But they found the right spot in South Laguna, and it was good to go for pizza. “It was already set up.” And the rest is history!

The path to the present

Fanarof came to the food business in a round about kind of way. He was a lifeguard. Maybe a hungry lifeguard. But after six years as a lifeguard, followed by a stint as a realtor, he bought the Spigot Liquor store. He converted it into a beach store with craft beers and wine. 

Sensing new trends as always, he introduced beach paddle racquets, which he had shipped in from Israel (thus the beginning of the paddle craze), and the very first Swatch watches (“We sold them like crazy in the liquor store”)… And then he had another brilliant idea – to bring in sandwiches. 

“I went to San Juan to meet a baker,” he said. “He sent me next door to a couple who would make sandwiches.” 

Fanarof worked with them, creating new taste sensations like ham and cream cheese, and turkey with cranberry sauce, to sell in the shop. Everybody loved those sandwiches that came in a brown bag. He declined the opportunity to partner with the couple as they expanded the business, but this was the beginning of the Brown Bag Sandwich Company. It’s now a successful giant of a company.

Being present

Perhaps the knack for seeking new trends in the marketplace is like a treasure hunt. Because treasure hunting is something Fanarof enjoys too, in the modern way: one garage sale at a time.

He happily showed me some of the favorite things he’s bought on Saturday mornings. Granted, garage sales in Laguna tend to be pretty high caliber stuff, but Fanarof has found some cool, trending pieces, like the Murano sculptural glass that he then had made into a chandelier. 

Garage sale treasure, turned into a beautiful chandelier

He told me of the time Claire said, “We could use a bench”, and he went on the hunt, finding a perfect bench that same day. “It’s fun,” he said. “I look for esthetics at garage sales.”

After a long day at garage sales, or shopping in the ethnic food markets he also loves, Fanarof has found a practice that relaxes him. “It’s like water shiatsu,” he explains of the gentle form of body therapy called Watsu. He swears by it for himself and is also a practitioner.

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Fanarof and his Watsu pool 

Sid Fanarof has travelled all over the world, but there’s nothing like returning home. It’s given him the perspective from a visitor’s point of view. 

“It’s always great to come home,” he says. He’ll walk the dog along Heisler Park, and just shout out ironically, “Wouldn’t it be great to live here?” 

Because of course, it is, and sometimes he just has to pinch himself.


Ben Simon:

Passion for architecture, design and Laguna

Written by: SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by: Mary Hurlbut

When Ben Simon was 10 years old, he and his family rented a vacation house in Emerald Bay.  “I remember the house had a triple-decker bed; there was a tunnel to the beach…we went to the Sawdust Festival and The Cottage, and I thought ‘I’m going to live here one day.’”  

At the time, he and his family lived in Washington, DC so this personal mission was by no means a slam-dunk. Nevertheless, true to his 10-year old self, Simon eventually made his way to Laguna Beach where he has become an important voice in residential design.

Ben Simon, of Acme Architecture and Interior Design Group

A childhood interest becomes a career

As a child, Simon says he sketched “impossible” houses, many of them set on the cliffs of Laguna.  With a mother and grandmother who were artists and a father who was trained as an aerospace engineer, architecture was “the perfect blending of right brain and left brain,” explains Simon.  His childhood interest continued and Simon ultimately graduated from the University of Maryland with a BS in Architecture.  Post-graduation, he took a job in Los Angeles with Albert C. Martin and Associates, a large architectural firm that “designs structures like City Hall and the Bank of America building” in downtown Los Angeles. 

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Ben Simon at his home/office. Partner, Linda Morgenlander, lives right next door

Coming to Laguna Beach – for good

A few years of Los Angeles was enough for Simon, so he relocated to Albert C. Martin’s Irvine office. Finally, he was close enough to realize his childhood goal of living in Laguna Beach.  “I was only there (at Albert C. Martin) a couple of years before I went out on my own.  I always wanted to be my own boss…doesn’t everybody?” asks Simon. 

“This was in the ’80’s so I got my real estate license - everybody got their real estate license in the ’80’s.  I worked for Coldwell Banker, with the office on Crescent Bay Drive and met so many great people.  Then I started staging houses and it just grew and grew.”  There was one detour before Simon jumped back into design wholeheartedly — modeling. “Mostly cheesy romance novel covers,” he says with a laugh.  After a few years, Simon decided he needed a “grown up” job. “Modeling was great for the ego,” laughs Simon, but it was time to get back to his true passion: design. 

Design Review nets a partner

In 1998 Simon was elected to the sit on the Design Review Board.  “I loved it!  It felt very natural for me to participate. It wasn’t always easy, but I really enjoyed it,” says Simon about his time on the Board.  During his last year, in 2004, the architect, Linda Morgenlander, also joined the Board.  The two hit it off immediately.  ‘We were born three days apart.  We’re both from New York.  We’re both Jewish.  We just have a lot of fun together,” says Simon enthusiastically.  A few years after meeting, they became business partners and Acme Architecture and Interior Design was born.  

“It just evolved.  It was meant be. The first house we designed together was my parents’ house.”  Bought with the idea that it would be a second home, the house turned out so nicely, Simon’s parents relocated from Rancho Santa Fe to live in it permanently.  It was an auspicious beginning for the new firm.  It also meant Simon could now just “walk to their house for Thanksgiving” – no more navigating the 405 to Rancho Santa Fe!

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Personal mementos, artfully displayed at Ben Simon’s home

While his parents are close, Morgenlander is even closer.  She lives right next door.  “We talk constantly, Monday through Friday, from 9 to 5.  We do not talk at all on the weekends,” explains Simon with a laugh.  

His house, formerly lived in by Timothy Leary, serves as the main office for Acme.  Spread out around his desk are samples of tile and fabrics to show clients.  “We do the architecture; we do interiors.  We prefer to do both, but will do either, depending on the clients’ needs.  We get very involved with them.  It’s important that the house reflects who they are, and doesn’t just look like the back page of a Restoration Hardware catalog,” says Simon emphatically.

A personal vision

Simon’s home-office is definitely not a re-working of anyone else’s aesthetic vision, rather a very personal statement of meaningful things collected to make a home.  “Right now, I’m having a love-affair with my house,” Simon tells me.  After a brief tour, his affection for the house and its history is obvious. He kept some original bathroom tile, for example, even though it isn’t really to his taste because, “It had to stay.  It’s just part of the house.”

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The upper terrace of Ben Simon’s home is a great place to relax

Hopes for the Planning Commission and something “spectacular”

When asked, “What’s next?” Simon replied that he would like to secure a position on the Planning Commission.  “I’m passionate about Laguna. I understand a lot of different aspects: preservation, real estate, business interests, the tourist economy.  I think a lot of my professional and life experiences could be an awesome addition,” he says.  And his future plans don’t end there. “I know that because I am so lucky and have been given so many gifts it’s important that I show my appreciation by trying to do something important.”  

He smiles slyly when pressed for more details. “I fantasize about doing something spectacular.  Time will tell.”  Regardless of whether or not his mystery plans materialize, Acme Architecture and Interior Design will continue to deliver “classic, timeless and appropriate design.”  

ForSimon’s clients, “spectacular” may have already been achieved.  


The many facets of Molly Zurflueh

By MAGGI HENRIKSON

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

What a treat to meet Molly Zurflueh and her adorable one-month-old baby, Lana. Two beautiful people at once! While we talked, more than a few passers-by stopped to coo and shower the baby with attention. Who can resist? 

Certainly Molly can’t. For her whole life she wanted to be a mom. Happily, now Lana’s brother, Chase (“almost eight”), mom Molly and her fiancée, Greg Carpenter (“Oh, God, he’s just a wonderful farm boy from Indiana!”), are one big family and enjoying every moment. It is a conscious choice amidst a busy life for this lawyer, who is also El Morro’s Garden Club director, and the Girl’s Night Out event chair for the Boys & Girls Club. 

Somehow all these roles circle around the joy of children and community, and Molly Zurflueh (the eh is silent) accomplishes it all with grace and charm.

Molly Zurflueh

Whee!

Molly considers herself blessed to have arrived in Laguna. Her dad, a Swiss geophysicist, brought his family to California initially. He fell in love with the place, but, alas, his career took the family back east to reside in Washington DC for all of Molly’s growing up years. It was her grandma who immigrated to the US, and set out for the west coast. She convinced Molly to look into law schools in California. Molly, with her zest for life, had already gone part of the way westward, studying at the University of Texas for her undergrad degree. She moved onward to Whittier Law School.  

She loved it. “I was like, wow, why did we ever leave?” 

Life’s too short to spend it anywhere else but here. The rest of her family remains in the DC area, but Molly was cut of a different cloth in many respects. “I was the youngest of four, but the more adventurous,” as she explains it. “I was the one that was, ‘Whee!’”

Molly was able to spend time with her grandmother before she passed away. “I got two great years with her here,” she says fondly. And she brought to California a skill she had grown up with in DC, and sharpened in Texas: a keen interest in politics.

On the Campaign Trail

“That’s my thing,” she says. “I’m fascinated by the statistics, the political news. I like campaigns and strategy …I’d read all day if I could!”

As a college youngster, Molly Zurflueh jumped out of the gate in a fortuitous campaign for governor; she threw her cowboy hat in the ring for George W. Bush. 

“I campaigned for George Bush when he ran for governor. It was my start,” she said. “When I was in school in Texas I met him, and said, ‘I want to get on board’, and he gave me the [contact] card for his people.”

She campaigned for him for president too, and ultimately there was a place for Molly back in DC. 

She took a job with HUD advocating for elderly and disabled housing, and battling their discrimination. This was a rewarding experience, though she was none too thrilled to be back in DC. Things improved after a call from a colleague in the State Department. She was offered the chance to travel as the president’s press advance, where she would organize and plan strategic areas for the press corps. 

“I did G8 Summit work, then a summit in Mexico, and one in Ireland,” she said. She met the president of Japan and Tony Blair, and even got to ride on Air Force One. “They even give you a certificate for that!” 

She was impressed with how President Bush was with the press corps, she tells us. “He was all access. He knew them all by name, and he knew their families.”

But it was active and physical work, and one day Molly seriously twisted an ankle requiring surgery. If she did work in that arena again, she’d rather be on the policymaking end than on the physical running-around-with-the-press side of things.

Number one priority

After law school, Molly found her way to Laguna through a friend who worked for attorneys Tom Davis and Larry Nokes. She was overjoyed to join that office, and work of council. “I loved their personalities,” she says. “They’re real.” 

And there’s not much better than living and working in Laguna. “I thought, how much better could this be?” And then it was better. When she had a child, her priorities shifted.

It’s the quandary of the modern woman; how much can I take on, and what does “having it all” mean? There was a time when Molly thought she could do it all. But with her baby in the equation she found there was just not enough time to be a complete parent while at the office all day. It was a giant leap into the unknown, but every instinct inside her said, “you’ve got to try!” And so she left the law firm, and went home on her own terms.

“I just went home,” she said. “That’s the beauty of working for yourself.”

The at-home office

With a good sense of where her priorities were, she got to spend time with Chase, take him to his karate classes and to school events. 

“It’s almost selfish how much fun I have with him, we have a blast,” she says. “It’s a privilege and a blessing to raise your children.” 

Ultimately, most of Molly’s clients are friends, and they came knocking on her door. Now she has found the sweet spot between handling as much legal work as she can from home, while enjoying Chase, and now Lana.

Digging in the dirt

A big part of the joy in being a parent is becoming more childlike. When the parent sees the world through their child’s eyes, they can join with them in exploring the wonders of the world around them. For Molly, the happiest place to share that wonder is in the garden. 

She’s gone and gotten her hands dirty in the good earth by volunteering at El Morro’s popular garden club. It’s a two-way street of excitement about every little bud and vegetable they help create. “The kids are amazing! We have such a good time together, I really get more out of it than I give,” she says.

It was Molly’s grandma that introduced her to the joys of gardening when she was six years old. She laughs, “I used to pretend I had a gardening show!”

It’s tomato time

This year Molly took the reins as director of the El Morro Garden Club. Together they plant and harvest vegetables, grow a wildflower garden, and learn about butterflies. Next up she has big, exciting plans to start a worm box and that actually gets all the kids jumping for joy. “They’re so grateful,” she tells us. 

Just like they’re doing now at El Morro, Molly reminds us that now is the time to plant tomatoes. 

Girls Night Out

Even when she didn’t have free time, Molly made time to volunteer in the community. Her first stop of choice was at the Boys & Girls Club. 

Helping out at the club is great for the kids, and fun for Molly too. But to help the club into the future, she’s big into fundraising. There are a lot of expenses associated with the hundreds of children nurtured at the club every day, and the events committees are on top of that. 

“They don’t get discouraged about expenses,” Molly says. “They say, ‘it’s just another hurdle’.” Thankfully the club has a number of hurdlers.

There are two events that really boost the Boys & Girls Club coffers: the Gala, in the spring, and “Girls Night Out” in the fall. Molly is the “fun” part in “fundraising” with Girls Night Out, as this year she chaired the event.

“It’s all women, and everyone dresses to the nines for each other. It’s a night to have fun!” she says.

Behind the scenes, many hands make light(er) the work. There are volunteers out soliciting donations from businesses, others coordinating the food and drink, and more wrapping up baskets for the silent auction. The evening includes a DJ, Starfish catered food, cocktail bars, and a live auction. Oh, and jewelry.

It all begins with a walk down the red carpet into the home of Holly and David Wilson. Along the red carpet are models from the jewelry house of Lugano Diamonds, just dripping in gems. Guests are encouraged to drape the jewels on themselves, and drink fancy cocktails, and go deep in their purses for the success of the Boys & Girls Club. It’s for the kids!

“It’s really decadent fun,” Molly assures.

Keeping it real

Molly, Greg, and Lana

Let’s take a pause to admire the beautiful baby Lana. Ooh, I just can’t help but ooh and awww! 

There’s no one who feels more grateful than Molly. “I really wanted another child, and now I have my daughter,” she beams. The future goes from squiggly baby feet to taking giant steps, and life’s lessons along the way. “I want to teach my kids that we are privileged to be here, but that there are people in need,” she said. “You’re lucky – so get out there and help.”

As for Molly’s future, she’s a self-proclaimed “softie for kids and old people”, so it will involve work on their behalf. 

“I feel like I still haven’t done enough,” she said. “I need to make more time to give back more.”

Yes, invent that – more time!


Diane Armitage: Sharing all the Best of Laguna

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

“When you have vision and commitment, a path unfolds.” So says Diane Armitage, author of “The Best of Laguna Beach: The best places to dine, drink and play”. Upon meeting Armitage it becomes apparent very quickly that she has an abundance of both.

Her “path” looks more like a bustling highway of projects, but these day she’s motoring full steam towards her book launch, a complete update on her 2013 Laguna Beach’s Best

Expanded from 170 to 380 pages, Armitage lists her favorites of just about everything Laguna has to offer: Best margaritas? Check. Best breakfast burritos? Check. Best of what to do, when? Check. But her favorite of favorites is highlighting “the culinary mecca”, as she calls it, of Laguna Beach.  

To say Armitage is passionate about the artistry and commitment of some of our local chefs is an understatement. “It’s an insane job. It’s a marriage to their craft. They never stop!” Armitage is talking about the chefs she has gotten to know and admire, but she could just as easily be describing herself and her commitment to finding the best of Laguna.

Photo by Mike Altishin

Diane Armitage and her “Best of Laguna” culinary greats: 

Many chefs and GMs of Laguna Beach join Armitage (center) 

for a “best of” celebration 

(First row from left, Lindsay Smith-Rosales of Nirvana Grille, Michael and Christine Avila of Avila›s El Ranchito, Jim Tolbert and Kurt Bjorkman of The Ranch, David Fune of Splashes and Surf & Sand Resort, Neil Skewes of Starfish Asian Cuisine, Camron Woods of The Ranch, George Poulos of Mozambique Steakhouse, Josh Severson of Selanne Steak Tavern, Debra Sims of Maro Wood Grill, Thomas Crijns of Brussels Bistro. Top row from left, John Nye of Driftwood Kitchen and The Deck, Chis Keller and Amy Amaradio of Juice & Shakes, K›ya, Rooftop and Marine Room, Demetri Catsouras of The White House, Armando Ortega of Lumberyard, Jonathan Pflueger of Sourced Cuisine, Cary Redfearn of Lumberyard, John Bodrero of Orange Inn, Maro Molteni of Maro Wood Grill, Rainer Schwarz of Driftwood Kitchen & The Deck) 

Making it happen

In 2000 Armitage took a job in Carlsbad, despite having her own successful marketing agency, Armitage, Inc., in Colorado. “I was early in the whole Internet marketing thing. They signed me to a three-year contract. It was a very corporate structure. After eight months, I said, ‘It’s fixed, new marketing strategy in place, it’s selling and I gotta get back to running my own company.’ So I called Bob Proctor (a client, mentor and friend) and said, ‘I’m done.’ He said, ‘Where do you want to be?’  I said, ‘Italy!’ He recommended I go some place where I knew they had Internet service,” she says laughing. “So I said, ‘I loveLaguna Beach, but it’s too expensive.’ And you just don’t say that kind of stuff to Bob. He told me ‘Drive up there right now and get a PO box. Make it happen.’ So I did. A week and a half later I got a random email about a rental. I moved in three weeks later.” 

And she has enthusiastically called Laguna Beach “home” ever since.

Submitted photo

“The Best of Laguna Beach: The best places to dine, drink and play

Stepping boldly forward

Securing a P.O. Box without first securing a place to live is not the way most people do things. However, for Armitage, her philosophy of “boldly stepping forward” is a textbook case for creating one’s opportunities. Another “bold step” was when Armitage decided to purchase paint, rugs and patio furniture for an apartment that wasn’t going to be available for two years. 

“I told the manager that I wanted to be the first name on the waiting list when that apartment became available. She told me the couple who lived there had just moved in, signed a two-year lease and were extremely happy. I said, ‘That’s great. Put my name on the list.’” 

Armitage went about selecting items for the apartment and putting them in a storage unit. Five months later, the couple moved out, deciding to buy a house in Dana Point. “I just went to my storage unit and unloaded all my stuff I’d bought and moved in. It was hysterical.” Armitage lived there for seven years.

Creating a “spotlight” on Laguna Beach

As Armitage’s marketing agency continued to grow, her niche expanded to include high-end restaurants and resorts. In 2008, she had an epiphany. “I realized as I was running my team all over the world to these amazing resorts, that I lived in an amazing resort. And there was no spotlight on the culinary world in Laguna Beach. That’s when I started my blog, “Laguna Beach’s Best.”  

With Armitage, Inc. clients that include Michelin-star restaurants in Las Vegas, Armitage had developed a true appreciation for the passion and dedication of great chefs. Getting to know the ones closer to home motivated her to create “a spotlight” on them. “Laguna has this crazy personality. Everyone who is here has chosen to be here.  Restaurateurs choose to be here. This is a magical place where they want to create their magic,” she says.  

It all starts with Mom

The blog had one very dedicated reader when it was in its infancy. 

“My only reader was my mother. Just like that book, Julie and Julia,” Armitage says, laughing. “But I kept going at a good pace. I know what to do to get blogs visible, so I kept working at it and the audience grew. Then I got busy and stepped away from it for a few months. When I checked back in someone had posted, ‘This blog sucks! Everything is old!’ So that got me fired up, and I jumped back into it. Now that I think of it, the person who posted that was probably my mother,” says Armitage, with a knowing smile. “She knows how to get me going.”

Now with an audience of 20,000 subscribers, Armitage no longer needs her mother’s motivation. 

Submitted photo

 

Starfish co-owners Archie McConnell (left) and Gretchen Andrews (right) have been regular and generous contributors to the Pacific Marine Mammal Center since the restaurant’s opening party three years ago. They’re working with Diane Armitage now on a third-year anniversary party at Starfish in June.  

Widget-izing a labor of love

With her blog such a success, turning it into a book seemed a natural progression.  “I talked about it for three years,” says Armitage. “I work with businesses all the time on this kind of thing, but I haven’t necessarily applied what I know to myself. The thing I tell them is, ‘We’ve got to widgetize’. Meaning, they need to create a repeatable something.  Well, I needed to create my own widget! The book was it. It was a lot harder than I expected, partly because my best friend, Lisa, said it had to have color photos,” says Armitage with mock exasperation.  

With her first edition a hit, Armitage decided to produce an updated version. “So much has changed. I needed to update it.  Now, just about every entry is in the book,” she says with pride.  

And while she has written about every nook and cranny of Laguna Beach, it all comes back to her interest in the culinary scene. “The chefs I know are so passionate and so amazing,” she says. 

And that is why she works so hard to highlight their work.  Her blog and her book are true labors of love. No one pays her to promote them; if you’re in her book or blog it is because she is truly excited about what you’re doing. This honest enthusiasm has helped her to become a culinary resource. Where it will lead to next remains to be seen, but Armitage isn’t lacking for ideas or people willing to follow her lead. 

Bringing chefs together, literally and figuratively

The day before we met she had organized a photo shoot with 22 local chefs. “A lot of them didn’t know each other.  They don’t collaborate.  Not because they’re competitors – they aren’t. They’re just too busy,” explains Armitage. And if she has her way, they’ll be even busier. Food truck wars, progressive dinners, beer tastings, and, the thing that is near and dear to her heart, a big dinner benefitting the Pacific Marine Mammal Center (PMMC). “They don’t know about that one yet,” she says slyly. However, I’m sure she will be able to convince them to support her cause.

She overflows with gratitude when she talks about the PMMC event that local restaurants, The Deck, and Driftwood Kitchen, put on last year. As she recounted their generosity, she literally got tears in her eyes. “It was such an amazing event!  What they did and how they did it…it was fabulous. They inspired other chefs to get involved.”  

Click on photo for a larger image

 

Diane Armitage with Kirsten Sedlick, 

Pacific Marine Mammal Center’s Senior Animal Care Supervisor, and also a previously featured person in Stu News’ Laguna Life & People

Those sea lions eat a lot of fish

Armitage’s friend, Ruben Flores, got her involved in the PMMC. “I don’t even know how I got to be friends with him!” she says about Flores, laughing. “He is the most amazing person.” She began working on the PMMC events and helping them with their visibility. Now, she’s on the Board. 

“I’m drawn to people with passion and commitment,” she says when talking about the people she works with there. “The cost to run that place is insane!” That’s why a portion of the proceeds from her book, Laguna Beach’s Best will go to the PMMC. “The amount of fish that get eaten every day is extraordinary!” she says. “Argh…not more tears,” she says smiling. “I get emotional when I talk about that place.” 

A full plate of clients, books, blogs and, of course, StuNews

However, there is nothing – not even sick sea lions – that ignites Armitage’s passion like exploring her adopted home town, especially the food scene here. She has embraced Laguna as only one who took a risk to live here can. 

While running a 20-person strong marketing agency, writing a blog that requires a lot of research (hey, finding the best margarita might be fun, but it’s still research!), writing and compiling a 380 page book, volunteering for the PMMC, and writing the “Laguna Dining” column for StuNews, she still has enough energy to plan for and dream of “what’s next.” So it’s almost laughable when Armitage comments, “I guess I’m never not busy.” Uh…I guess not! 

Book signing celebration at Laguna Beach Books

Next up is her book signing at Laguna Beach Books on Sunday, April 26 at 4 p.m.,  “I want to have a lot of people there! It’s a celebration of Laguna Beach.” 

Spend five minutes with Diane Armitage and you will see there is so much to celebrate. Whether you’re here for a weekend or you’ve lived here your whole life, Laguna Beach’s Best will undoubtedly inspire you to explore the best of what our town has to offer.  

Of course you can always check in to see what’s the latest on Diane’s plate at her website, www.LagunaBeachBest.com and in Stu News Laguna – for all her best.


Artist Fitz Maurice is “out there”, heart and soul 

By MAGGI HENRIKSON

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

“It frees my soul to be out in nature. In order to do it right, you’ve got to head out,” says Fitz Maurice.  “Why wait for the mountain to come to you? Go to the mountain!”

I talked with the artist in her Laguna Canyon gallery, surrounded by impressions of forests, mountains, lakes and streams. Maurice’s art is a creation comprised of one part soul, one part passion, her God given talents along with classical training, and a whole lott’a inspiration from nature. 

“Don’t Fence Me In” ought to be her theme song.

Fitz Maurice

The works hanging on the studio walls these days represent the beginnings of her most recent and heartfelt endeavor: to paint live at all of America’s National Parks. 

“My soul as an artist gravitates toward pure nature.” 

This artist’s technique involves layering “veils” of color-saturated pigment on linen canvas, all painted in a natural setting. Her paintings require weeks and often months to complete. All the materials are archival – meant to last the ages just as the Great Master’s paintings that Maurice is fond of studying. Her images depict scenes from the years she’s spent in Europe, and the hills and valleys all over the US. 

Among the many awards and accomplishments, her “Tree Series” of paintings earned her the Jackson Pollock-Lee Krasner Award. She was also recently selected by Acadia National Park to be artist-in-residence alternate for the year 2016. 

Many of her works are currently exhibited at the Roberto Pellechia studio in the Laguna Design Center. “These are large and major paintings – almost a retrospective,” she says. “It really shows a good spectrum.” 

Maurice has created more than 1,000 paintings, and devotes five days a week to it. She happily admits to going strong, “A thousand so far, and I’m alive and kickin’!” The other two days she takes a break for fun and relaxation. “I play outside!” Of course.

Click on photo for a larger image

 

Maurice’s canyon art gallery

The ambitious mission to paint all the national parks, live, promises to be a long and adventurous journey. There are 59 national parks, and almost 400 under the park service jurisdiction when you include the national memorials and monuments. 

“I’m just really excited because I know how much truth and beauty I’ll encounter,” Maurice says. “These are the things that soothe your soul.”

The checklist in preparation for Fitz’s grand adventure reads like a gypsy tale. First, take your home with you. Check. She’s got the mobile trailer, and a truck to haul it. Next, reduce and simplify your “stuff”, so that you own just what you need. Check. Then go where the road leads you. Check.

Click on photo for a larger image

 

Truck. Check. Ready to get to the national parks!

Well, she will make some priorities on her calendar according to the best the parks have to give, like flower blossom time in Death Valley, or autumn foliage in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. She’s gotten as far as selecting the first two she’ll visit: Bryce Canyon National Park, in Utah, followed by Rocky Mountain National Park, in Colorado.

“Then I’ll see what happens,” the gypsy says. “When you climb a mountain, it’s better not to focus on the top!”

Born an artist

Raised in Westchester County, NY, Fitz felt her calling early on. “I’ve known all my life,” she says. “I’m not a painter, I’m an artist. I have an artist’s soul.” 

Knowing who she was and what she wanted has certainly contributed to her success as an artist. Fitz Maurice pursued art in her education, from her BFA through training at major museums and art schools, and on to follow the Old Master’s footsteps in Europe, training at the International School of Art in Umbria, Italy. She paid her way all along as an artist, moved to Laguna Beach, and raised a child here, all with the income of an artist. No small accomplishment.

The inspiration she takes from nature was also bred in her bones. Her family introduced her to the national parks and the joys of camping out, from as long ago as she can remember. She passed that passion on to her son, Dylan, and even to her nieces, nephews and friends. 

“It doesn’t cost a lot… you have treasured memories, and it’s a blast!” she says. Her challenge to American families now is to get out and enjoy the national parks. “It’s every American’s birthright. Get your hands dirty! Get outside!”

She hopes to turn the next generation on to the wonders of our national parks, and to preserving the environment. 

“When you’re immersed in nature you lose interest in ‘things’. I no longer care about materialism. It’s freedom when you have passion, and put on your play clothes. You turn into a kid again.”  

The Spirit

Maurice found her way to a more spiritual life about ten years ago, by living alone in the middle of nowhere. 

“I lived in the Zuni Mountains for years,” she said. “All alone for four seasons – no cell phone, no TV, no computer… I learned to listen to God. The greatest gift he’s given us is nature. I listened to the birds, learned about the migrations of the seasons, the phases of the moon… I was painting, painting, painting, reading and studying the ebb and flow of nature. 

“It’s a spiritual journey to set your mind free and let your spirit have peace.”

The future is weighing more heavily on Fitz Maurice’s mind, as she considers the preservation of open spaces, particularly lakes and rivers. 

“Water – that’s what the next world war is going to be about,” she says. “Water is a priceless, irreplaceable necessity. People have got to take it personally.”

She has seen lakebeds reduced by half and giant trees left above the former water line simply fall down. 

“The planet running out of water starts in your family… it starts with you. Don’t let the shower run. Get in!”

These are the kinds of issues that Maurice will blog about during her national parks painting adventure. She’ll be sending Stu News updates about her experiences along the road too. She’s very excited to have gotten the website: nationalparkpaintings.com

What she hopes to accomplish with her national parks series is a growing concern for their conservation, and a growing appreciation for their beauty. Plus it’s fun.

Click on photo for a larger image

 

“I want to show the essence and wonders that are unique to each park,” she says. 

And she wants others to follow along. “I want every family to get out there! Learn how to use a compass… learn how to find water. These are the things that are important. It’s about building a generation that’s going to appreciate this heritage we have.”

“As far as I know, I’m the only one who has set out to paint all the parks,” she continued. “But when Fitz says she’s going to do something, she does it! No doubt about it!”


Marshall Ininns: Creating homes in Laguna

Written by: SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by: Mary Hurlbut

Marshall Ininns has been an architect in Laguna Beach for 23 years.  He is also President of the Friendship Shelter Board of Directors.  In a way, this makes perfect sense.  Who knows better the importance people place on homes than a person responsible for designing them?  However, when asked why he is so passionate about ending homelessness in Laguna, Ininns’ answer is much simpler than that: “…but for the grace of God, go I, you know?  Looking back there were times in my life when I could have been there.”  

So, now, Ininns works two sides of a very different coin: helping people create their dream homes while working to make sure those with no home can find shelter.  

Building consensus is key

According to Ininns, being an architect is “…one third architect, one third lawyer and one third family counselor.”   He went to school for the first one.  The other two skills have certainly been honed through years of experience.  It’s not hard to imagine that getting a couple to agree on a particular design element could, at times, require a very high level of skill in consensus building.   This ability to wear different hats and listen to different perspectives is undoubtedly helpful in his role as President of the Friendship Shelter.  

“It has been an education,” he says of his tenure as president. “I have a tendency to want to just push things through, but in my role at the Friendship Shelter I try to let everyone speak and build consensus.  It seems to work better that way.”  

Marshall Ininns, owner of Marshall Ininns Design Group and President of the Board of Directors of Friendship Shelter

If you have a home then you’re not homeless

Ininns, though extremely personable when we met, was reluctant to do so.   “I don’t really like to talk about what I do, I just like to do it,” he explains.  And what his role for the Friendship Shelter requires him to do is, according to Ininns: “…to have the Friendship Shelter agenda promote discussion for the board members to come to a consensus as to the best way to make the Friendship Shelter successful.”  

A big part of the organization’s self-defined version of success is getting a permanent housing facility built for Laguna’s local homeless population.  “If we build it then 40 people wouldn’t be homeless anymore,” he says matter-of-factly.  And the building of that permanent facility is still a big “if” since agreement has not been reached among stakeholders on the proposed Laguna Canyon location. “There are a lot of things going on,” says Ininns about the permanent facility.  “It has been interesting.”   

Success in San Clemente

So while the permanent location has been in the works for four and a half years, the Friendship Shelter received $3.4 million to do a permanent housing facility in San Clemente.  The Friendship Shelter remodeled two 4-plex apartment buildings.  It will house disabled people in their late teens. Ininns also says the Friendship Shelter houses 18 people throughout different sites in the county.  

“After a year we have only had one person evicted,” he says with satisfaction.  

The cost of personal convictions

Ininns’ commitment to the Friendship Shelter has not been without professional cost.  People feel strongly about what to do with the homeless population, in general, and the canyon facility, in particular.  “I believe if you’re doing something that’s right you should do it.  If a client says, ‘I don’t want to work with you because you work with the homeless,’ then maybe I don’t want to work with them,” says Ininns.  

One gets the feeling this conversation is not simply rhetorical. On the flip side, however, other clients have been extremely supportive.  “Ivan Spiers (owner of Mozambique), Sam Goldstein, (owner of the Heisler Building), and Chris Keller (owner of The Marine Room, Ky’a, etc.) have all been big supporters of the Friendship Shelter,” says Ininns.

Click on photo for a larger image

 

Friendship Shelter, on S. Coast Highway in Laguna Beach

A family of architects

Whether clients (or potential clients) are supportive of the Friendship Shelter or not, Ininns’ commitment is unwavering.  Another area that has his unwavering commitment is Ininns’ family.  His two sons are following in their father’s footsteps as architects.  It is quite clear that despite Ininns’ understated manner, he is very proud of them.  One is working in Sweden as an architect.  “He applied for a visa, went to Sweden with no job, no house.  He found a job and a great house and is loving it!’ says Ininns.  His younger son is soon to graduate from college with a degree in architecture.  “I get a pay raise when my kid graduates from college,” says Ininns with a smile.

His sons, though in the same profession, have learned their trade much differently than Ininns did. “The computer changed everything.  I haven’t used my drafting table in years,” he says.  But Ininns adapted to the times.  “The computer has made communicating with clients a lot easier.  Revisions are easier.  But the art of doing it by hand has been lost.  I still have a box of 200 markers and 1000 pens,” he says without lament. 

Click on photo for a larger image

 

Marshall Ininns, architect, in his office in downtown Laguna Beach

Dinners Across Laguna

Ininns is also not lamenting the time the Friendship Shelter has worked on developing the permanent shelter in the Canyon.  It’s not his nature.  As with his profession, he simply adapts and keeps working.  

“The Friendship Shelter, as far as value, is excellent. The money isn’t going to administration or marketing.  It’s going to services,” he says.  One of the ways the Friendship Shelter raises money and builds awareness is through their “Dinners Across Laguna”.  Supporters of Friendship Shelter invite their friends to dinner for a fee that is then donated.  “This is how I was introduced to the Friendship Shelter,” explains Ininns.

If interested in hosting a dinner, people can contact the Friendship Shelter at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Laguna will do what’s right

When asked for his “vision of the future” Ininns did not hesitate: “We’d build a building that would house 40 once homeless people in a permanent home and have an alternate sleeping location that would house 30 people.  I feel optimistic because I believe the people of Laguna will do what’s right and take care of the weakest among us.  My long term goal is that we will not have homelessness in the backyard of Laguna.” 

Ininns’ term as president ends in January 2016.  Whether his vision will be realized by then remains to be seen, but it won’t be from lack of trying.


Nadia Babayi is planning for our “older and wiser”

By MAGGI HENRIKSON

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Nadia Babayi had a moment of epiphany that lingered in her mind. Maybe she could turn the joy she found in volunteer work into a full-time career. Maybe there really was a way to work with passion. Since she’s the kind of person who accomplishes her goals, she went for it – packing up 23 years worth of her professional life as an engineer, and returning to school to start anew. 

At UCI Nadia pursued a certification program to begin the next chapter in her life’s story, specializing in non-profit management. 

“I always loved fundraising and working with people,” she says. “And here at the Susi Q we run a non-profit and a center too. It’s like a double reward for me!”

Laguna Beach Seniors, at the Susi Q, is where Nadia has found not only her profession but also her heart and soul.

Nadia Babayi

“I fell in love with the center the first time I came here,” she said. “It’s so gorgeous and welcoming. And I love talking to wise and knowledgible seniors.”

The term, “seniors” covers a huge number of people with different interests. The Laguna Beach Seniors Susi Q members range in age from 55 to quite a few in their 90’s. Nadia’s challenge and great reward as its Executive Director is finding opportunities to engage every age group. She has seen their membership grow to more than 400, and she’s helped to create 13 clubs both for fun and learning. 

“I’d like to have more!” she says enthusiastically. 

Starting Out

The last time she was with her family in Iran, Nadia remembers being at the airport as the Ayatollah was sending jets out against the Kurdish population. It was 1979, Khomeni had just taken over, and the future was not looking good for a bright, young, modern woman. Her mother said to her, “Don’t come back.” 

 “I had a five hour delay for my flight out,” she said. “I was lucky to be on the last plane taking off.”

She studied in the US to become an engineer. Once she had her career mapped out, and her legal citizenship in hand, Nadia was able to bring her mother to live here. Her sister, Nahid, lives nearby as well. Husband, Frank, and their son Kian round out Nadia’s family network. 

It was Nadia’s mom who introduced to her the world of a senior center. Mom didn’t live in Irvine, but she would regularly go to the Lakeview Senior Center there, because she loved their Persian club. She got Nadia to go, and Nadia was impressed with everything about it. 

“I could see the senior center making a big difference in people’s lives,” she said. She started volunteering there and, ultimately, became involved with the Persian Cultural Council, which she helped to turn into its own non-profit organization.

A Center for the Ages

Here are some of Nadia’s favorite numbers: 

40 – That’s how long Laguna Beach Seniors has been going strong, and serving the community. 

72 – That’s the average age at the Susi Q. 

75 – That’s the percentage that program attendance has increased by, in just the last two years. 

2014 – That’s when Laguna Beach Seniors at the Susi Q received the Spirit of Laguna’s Non-Profit of the Year Award.

The Spirit of Laguna’s Non-Profit of the Year Award

It’s life affirming and heart warming just to know that the senior center is there for you, as every single one of us marches down the road gaining a few wrinkles here and there, and perhaps thinking about what will happen next. The idea is to have a home away from home, where there are helpful resources and activities for the aging years.

“There’s a really big growth in our senior population,” Nadia says. “People are taking care of themselves, and living longer.” In fact, 37% of Laguna Beach’s population is more than 55 years old, and there are more than 3,000 households in Laguna Beach with residents aged 65-plus.

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Laguna Beach Community and Susi Q Senior Center 

A very important feature of the Susi Q is one that sets them apart from every other senior center in Orange County; they provide free one-on-one professional counseling for depression.

Case in point is Norman Powell, who Nadia tells us responded to their program called “Are You Feeling the Blues?” … “Well, yes I am,” he said. 

Norman is at a certain age when most of his friends have passed away. Then his wife died, and he was terribly lonely. He read about the program at the Susi Q and gave them a call. Able to avail himself of the counseling and activities at the center, he started developing a new social life. He now feels like it’s his second home, and has even included the Susi Q in his will.

“He enjoys his social life,” said Nadia. “The outcomes of this program are very measurable.”

Inclusive, Diverse, Creative and Fun!

The stated values at the senior center read like the oath for a kindness club:

We help one another meet the challenges of time. We define ourselves and defy stereotypes. We embrace our diversity. We are collaborative and respectful. We give back to our community. We advocate for a hometown where can live for the rest of our lives.” Part of the success of the senior programs is because they echo the spirit that is inherent in Laguna. “We will make the Susi Q an essential resource for ‘boomers and beyond’ and Laguna Beach the best possible place to age gracefully, meet the challenges of time, and live it up for the rest of our lives.”

And they are living it up in the club meeting rooms every day. There’s the super popular ukulele class, which has created quite a few ukulele fanatics. Did you see them march in the Patriot’s Day Parade, with Uncle Sam leading the way? And there’s a big, competitive group at the ping pong tables, beefing up for their tournament in August. But the biggest club is the LGBT.

“I wanted to bring them together, and thank them for all they do in this community,” said Nadia. “They have so much fun, they bring in food, and movies… The Christmas party had about sixty people.”

The Susi Q art gallery, known as Gallery Q, puts on five exhibits a year, and Nadia assures us that their receptions are the best. “We give good food,” she laughs. “And good wine!”

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Nadia Babayi, Christine Brewer, and Andrea Heavican of Laguna Beach Seniors, proud of 40 years successfully serving the community

Forever and ever

When Nadia Babayi is not at her home-away-from-home Susi Q, she might be seen hiking the trails around El Morro, or sailing in Newport bay, or playing volleyball, or camping. She’s always on the go! But her mind is mostly on the goings on with Laguna Beach Seniors. 

She has just completed a three-year strategic plan which includes care resources management and life counseling services, more clubs and classes, and something they’ve called “Lifelong Laguna”; like a Susi Q without walls, so that they can reach out to help seniors in their homes, with whatever resources they need.

“With Lifelong Laguna, we are joining a global ‘aging in place’ movement,” she says. “And we are deepening our commitment to those who have made Laguna Beach the town we love and never want to leave.”

The goal is to be able to live at home, not in a “facility”, and be an active part of the social community.

Nadia Babayi is helping Laguna be the hometown we always wanted – forever.


Albie Beeler: Bringing his enthusiasm to the pool

Written by: SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by: Mary Hurlbut

If you want to find Albie Beeler, Laguna Beach Water Polo Club (LBWPC) coach and Laguna Beach High School swim team assistant coach, the best place to look is at the Laguna Beach High School/Community pool since he’s there about 13 hours a day.  Surprisingly, one gets the feeling after talking to Coach Beeler that he’d stay longer if it meant he could help kids — and adults — learn to love swimming or water polo even a little bit more.

Growing Laguna Beach Water Polo Club

Albie Beeler came to coach at LBWPC in 2008.  His older brother, Chad Beeler, has run LBWPC since 2000. Back then the program consisted of only 14 eighth grade boys who were trying to get ready for the high school team.  The club has since grown to more than 80 players, boys and girls, from 10 and under (10U) co-ed teams to a 14U girls team, and every division in between.  Part of that growth is due to Albie Beeler.  

As the coach of the 10U’s, Beeler is the one responsible for introducing this extremely demanding sport to most of the kids that come through LBWPC.  If they don’t have a good experience, they probably won’t be back.  Judging from the growth of the club, he is doing his part.

Laguna Beach Water Polo Club Coach, Albie Beeler

Coaching comes full circle

A typical day has Albie at the pool at 6 a.m. to help out the LBHS cross country team with cross training in the pool.  Then he teaches swim lessons throughout the day with a break in the middle to teach a masters swim class.  The energy (and noise) level pick up considerably when the LBHS swimmers hit the pool deck at 3. 

“I only did it [coached the LBHS team] because I thought it was going to be a cold winter and I didn’t want to be giving swim lessons in my backyard pool,” says Beeler. “But it has been so cool to come back and coach this group of kids.  They have a lot of respect for me and I have a lot of respect for them. It has really been the coolest thing ever.  It is very exciting to watch them.  They haven’t changed a bit since the first time I coached them.  They really haven’t!” says Beeler with a laugh.  Beeler coached some of this year’s LBHS senior boys on his first LBWPC team.  Coaching at the high school meant his coaching came full circle.

But it’s not nostalgia that makes Beeler so enthusiastic about coaching the high school team. He tells me that a group of girls on the varsity team asked him for extra help to get faster. He did extra work with them and when, at League Finals, they achieved their goal of swimming the 100-yard freestyle in under 60 seconds, no one — and I mean no one — was more excited than Beeler.  (I can attest to this personally, as I was sitting in the stands when it happened).

He brings that same zeal to his job when the younger kids show up at 5:45 p.m.  And while the LBHS swimmers bring a lot of energy to the pool deck, it pales in comparison to that of thirty-plus 10U kids.  When you walk in it is loud, the pool is full and Beeler is right in the middle of it, on his belly, laying on the wet pool deck so he can be face level with the kids in the water while he gives instructions.

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10U players Brenden Bellavia and Ryley McDennon at LBWPC practice

Coming back after a break

“I grew up in team sports my whole life.  That’s where I’m the happiest.  It’s not really work for me,” he says regarding his enthusiasm for coaching.  

A high school swimmer and water polo player at Canyon High School in Anaheim, as well as a Laguna Beach lifeguard from the ages of 16-25, Beeler played two years of water polo at Fullerton College before heading north to Humboldt where he had a sandblasting business.  “I got burnt out.  I needed a break from the water.  I was done being cold for awhile,” he says of his 10-year hiatus.   

Upon his return from Humboldt, Beeler says his brother “gave me a chance” when he hired him as a water polo coach.  “He is my coaching mentor,” Beeler says of Chad. “He taught me how to talk to kids, the basic drills, things like our counter-attack drill.  I’m still learning from him.” 

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Nate Evans (l), Lauren Short and Rebecca Storke run through drills at practice

 

The importance of team sports

Beeler may still be looking to his older brother for new drills, but he doesn’t need help articulating the role team sports play — or ought to play — in a kid’s life. “I think team sports should be about working hard, being accountable to others and doing something you love.  These days a lot of it is about achieving goals, like a scholarship.  I don’t like that.  I think it should be about playing and learning a sport that you love.” 

Specifically, regarding the youngsters under his tutelage, “My goal is that as long as we get better and better, as long as we learn from our mistakes, that’s enough.  If I can get a kid to shoot who’s not shooting then that’s a win,” says Beeler.

“Water polo is blowing up!”

So I had to ask, when he was growing up, which did he prefer: swimming or water polo?  “I enjoyed being fast and I enjoyed being strong.  I can’t say which I liked more.  I really liked it back when we had seasons (and you could do both),” he says laughing.  As far as where the growth is, it seems to be in water polo.  

“It’s crazy.  I get emails from people moving into the area. They don’t know anything about it, but they tell me, ‘Hey, we’re moving to Laguna and we don’t know anything about water polo but we hear it’s the thing to do.’”  He shakes his head in disbelief. “Water polo is blowing up!  Not just here in Laguna, but everywhere.  When I was in high school we had trouble fielding one team.  Now I have three 10U teams!”

Success creates an interest

Beeler gives a lot of credit for the recent growth of polo in Laguna to parent/coaches Erich Fischer and Scott Baldridge.  Fischer and Baldridge coached the girls teams at LBWPC when their girls, now at LBHS, were in age group water polo.  The LBHS girls team, coached by Ethan Damato, has won 50 consecutive games and back to back CIF Division 1 Championships.  And most of the girls on that team got their start at LBWPC. Judging by the number of 10U girls currently in the pool, their legacy continues. Not insignificantly, both the boys water polo team and swim team also won CIF this year.  Success helps pique interest. 

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10U player Lauren Short and her teammates wait for the next drill

A lifelong ambassador for the water

“We have a good system,” says Beeler. “I’m a little surprised that I’m still doing this, but, really, I can see myself doing this for the rest of my life.  When the high school girls asked me to help them, that’s what it’s all about. And the ten year olds?  They just make me smile every time I’m on the pool deck.”  If Beeler had his way, everyone would be at the pool, at least giving swimming or polo a try.  

“My job is to share these great sports with everybody.”  And if “sharing” means spending more time on the pool deck than off and exuberantly coaching anyone who will listen, then Coach Albie Beeler is doing his job – and then some.

Shaena Stabler is the Owner, Publisher & Editor.

Dianne Russell is our Associate Editor & Writer.

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Alexis Amaradio, Barbara Diamond, Dennis McTighe, Diane Armitage, Lynette Brasfield, Marrie Stone, Maggi Henrikson, Samantha Washer, and Suzie Harrison are our writers and/or columnists.

Mary Hurlbut and Scott Brashier are our photographers.

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