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Discovering What Lies Beneath: Festival of Arts Exhibitor Kathy Jones Trains Her Gaze on Hidden Delights

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

As a kid, Kathy Jones lived inside her imagination. Convinced that a secret button existed behind her bedroom wallpaper that could open a portal to another place, she peeled the paper off the wall. “My mother wasn’t happy about that,” she says. Neither was Kathy when she discovered nothing more than plaster and drywall.

Certain that tiny singers lived inside her family’s radio, Kathy stared at the back of the box and waited for them to come out.

You can write these anecdotes off as youthful fantasy and an active imagination. Or you can see them as early signs of an artist’s mind at work. A few tiles in the mosaic of one woman’s creative worldview – one that is complicated and concealed, the surface never what it seems. 

Discovering What closeup

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Kathy Jones, painter, has exhibited at the Festival of Arts since 2000

Seven decades later, Kathy’s curiosity hasn’t waned. She continues to be drawn to discovery and delighted by surprise. Compelled to keep pulling back life’s wallpaper, her work always attempts to discover something deeper and more fundamental to the human experience. “If a piece doesn’t surprise me in some way,” Kathy says, “you’ll never see it.”

An early appreciation for art

Kathy’s father was a newspaperman. His job took their family from the Bay area, where Kathy was born, to southern California while he worked first for Hearst and then for Norman Chandler at the LA Times

Newspapers gave Kathy access to some early tools of her trade. Her father brought home giant sheets of newsprint and Eagle drafting pencils. “I drew princesses and fantasy landscapes for my animals,” she says. She carried that love of art with her to Stanford University. 

“I’m a restless human being,” says Kathy. “When I had to declare a major my junior year [at Stanford], I thought ‘Why don’t you just handcuff me?’” While she studied drawing, printmaking and sculpture, she majored in French. Why? Because after studying abroad her sophomore year, she’d already taken the required courses. That freed her to explore every whim that interested her – from journalism to Middle Eastern history – any class was possible. 

That early curiosity across disciplines, and her willingness to take intellectual risks, still infuses everything Kathy does. It’s reflected in her art, in her eclectic Laguna Canyon home, in her career in academia, and in her rich friendships. While curiosity may have begun as an innate trait, she’s known how to feed it in various ways throughout her life. It continues to pay dividends.

The trips of the trade

Kathy credits her time abroad for informing much of her work today. Living in France and Germany played an important role in her development as artist and woman. But it was her two years in Egypt, in her early 20s, that transformed her thinking and influenced the lens through which she views the world. 

From 1964 to 1966, Kathy and her first husband lived in Cairo and spent time on the banks of the Red Sea. His work as research scientist and college professor took them to exotic locales. They trained around the perimeter of India, spent time in Saudi Arabia, but made their home in Egypt where Kathy taught art in the Cairo American College. “There was a sense of cultural adventure and cultural celebration,” says Kathy. That influence remains in her work today. “The textiles and the silver. The markets. Egyptian souqs had bags of spices and Turkish jewelry. It was all dazzling to me.”

Her work continues to be steeped in those vibrant colors. “Every painting is an unknown journey,” Kathy says. She’s carried that sense of adventure, those rich textures and tones, and that discovery of the unknown onto her canvases. 

An homage to women

Some years ago, Kathy became captivated by the work of Ernest J. Bellocq, who photographed New Orleans Storyville prostitutes in 1912. “His book always meant a lot to me. The respect and care Bellocq showed in these portraits always touched me. I wanted to pay homage to these girls.” So she created her own Storyville series.

Kathy came of age right before the feminist movement. “In college, only a couple of women went to medical school or law school.” Kathy says she was born between things – too late to be affected by WWII, too early to bear the full brunt of the Civil Rights movement and feminism. 

Her mother was a powerful influence, an Iris Apfel character, modeling Apfel’s fashion iconography and bold style. She owned a shop in Laguna, Townsend’s, specializing in gorgeous textiles and ornate beads. “She’d pair simple muslin pants and tops with incredibly beautiful jackets. Beads from all kinds of sources.” Kathy appreciated the ethnic celebrations in her mother’s work.

Kathy’s own two daughters carry on the legacy of strength. Hallie is the Executive Director of the Laguna Canyon Foundation. “Hallie is a reader and a writer,” Kathy says. “Meg is a maker. She’s always doing something cool. Tie-dying or making beads.” 

Discovering What girls

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Kathy with her daughters, Hallie and Meg

Kathy’s latest exhibit (on display now at the Festival of Arts) is called “In the Mood.” It reflects particular moments in her life and the feelings those moments evoke. Watching her daughters as women and mothers inspired some of this latest work. “One painting is the feeling I have when I watch my daughter and her adolescent girl begin to separate. Another is about watching the career choices my other daughter has to weed through.”

Women – whether strong and powerful, quiet and reflective, in positions of influence, or as steadfast mothers – are important to Kathy. She uses words like ‘homage’ and ‘respect’ more than once when speaking of the women in her life.

A room of her own

“You walk into an art studio and there’s this wonderful aroma,” she says. “And this sense of possibility.” 

Kathy keeps a space at the Laguna Canyon Artists’ Studios, which she’s had since the early 2000s. “The first time I wrote a check, it felt like an indulgence. I’m paying money for just a space to paint. Then I thought, ‘Wow!’ And I still have that feeling every time I walk in. This space means that these paintings are my paintings.”

Discovering What in studio

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An intimate look inside Kathy’s art studio in Laguna Canyon

Her space used to be a dance studio. It still has a giant mirror on one wall. Kathy uses the mirror as part of her process, looking ahead while painting and then, periodically, looking back at her work through the mirror to give herself a different perspective. “It’s an iterative process,” she tells me.

Kathy says the surfaces of her paintings need to be as important as the content. Texture is everything. “I like to see the artist’s hand in the work,” she says. “My paintings are about silence, solitude, space, and shadows – about the moments between actions. I paint people waiting, or gazing, or pausing, or moving from one place to another.” If a piece is working well, Kathy says her audience will feel inspired to bring their own history and stories to the work, making it a shared experience.

Business before art

Prior to devoting her time to painting, Kathy had a storied career in academia. She was the first female Vice Chancellor at UCI and a Vice President at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. After leaving Georgetown, she worked in management consulting and strategic planning consulting.

“To me, a well-run organization has structure, focus, and balance. That’s not different from a painting. There’s an organic whole to both of those.” Kathy says her experience as an artist influenced her management side, incorporating some sense of vitality and fun into the work. She was driven, and accomplished a great deal, but with a lot of joy, respect and civility that’s often absent in the business world.

The delights of aging

We talk about growing older, and the pressures time places on women. “I don’t mind getting older. It’s freeing,” she says. “I came to realize this life is finite. As a result, things matter more to me. You drop the petty stuff (not that I ever dwelled on the petty things anyway). But I recognize this is what it is, and I’m going to take full advantage of it.”

Kathy almost seems giddy talking about this time in her life, and the unexpected surprises that keep coming. “There was a period of time when I was younger and I looked at people my age. I thought they’d done everything. They had their kids, they had their career. There’s nothing new under the sun for them. And I was completely – 100 percent – wrong. That is so great!” 

The gifts of the Festival of Arts

Kathy has exhibited in the Festival of Arts since 2000. “Showing one’s work is hard,” she says. “Having to stand in front of it, talk about it, hear about it. It’s not where I wanted to go. But you have to put your foot in that puddle.”

Discovering What at FOA

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Kathy showing her work to a Festival visitor

From the Festival, Kathy has gotten clients and gallery connections. It’s given her authority to embrace the role of artist. “There’s also a sense of companionship and respect,” she says. “I’m touched by the support that artists give each other, and the joy they take in other people’s accomplishments.” 

I ask how she knows when a piece is finished. “Paintings talk to you like children. When you’re a mother, you’re always hearing, ‘Mom! Mom! Mom!’ When a painting stops yelling at you, you know it’s done.” 

Perfection is the enemy, Kathy tells me. You have to know when to let it go. “I never wanted to be one of those old women who was crushed by the weight of her paintings,” she says. Letting them out into the world seems a necessary part of her process.

Behind the next door…

Whenever people ask Kathy which piece is her favorite, she tells them it’s her next one. “The next one has infinite possibility. That gives me a sense of optimism.”

That seems to be Kathy’s best-kept secret: Never stop peeling back the wallpaper.


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Bella Nenadov: This young entrepreneur has things figured out

By SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Bella Nenadov is not afraid to take risks. She’s also not afraid of change. Both of these traits have served the 13-year-old Thurston Middle School student well since she arrived on the West Coast from Ohio three years ago. 

Immersing herself in foreign languages

Bella says her father’s job is the reason the family relocated. Originally, the family relocated to Laguna Niguel. But, Bella says, “My parents heard how good the schools were in Laguna Beach so we moved here the next year.” And Bella has taken advantage of Laguna’s schools, immersing herself in one of her passions: foreign languages. This September, when Bella starts 8th grade, she will take French and Spanish. Additionally, she says she is determined to teach herself Italian over the rest of her summer.

Embracing one of Laguna’s specialties: water polo

Another project Bella has taken on this summer is to become competent as a water polo goalie. She’d like to fill the position on the Laguna Beach 14 and under girls’ water polo team when the new season starts in September. “I want to be the B team goalie,” she says. She explains the current goalie moved on to high school so there is a position that needs to be filled. As a new recruit to the game (it’s not a big sport in Ohio), she has decided it’s her best chance to make a contribution. “We just got a pass to the pool so I will go and do drills. And my dad and brother will throw balls at me,” she says with a laugh. There is no mention of private lessons or clinics, instead she seems determined to master these skills on her own.

Known for her treats for both people and pooches

This self-determination doesn’t end at the pool. Bella came to our attention because she makes natural, homemade dog treats, in addition to baked goods for people, and sells them on the weekends at Moulton Meadows Park. Her schedule isn’t rigid, but she tries to set up her table at least every other weekend. Her treats, it seems, are quite a hit.

LLP Bella closeup

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Bella Nenadov is 13 with a reputation for baking exceptional treats

Her motivation for creating the dog treats was her own dog, a Yorkie-bichon. “They’re very picky,” she says. Her motivation for creating her human treats was herself. “I love cupcakes,” she says smiling. “My favorites are probably blueberry-lemon or raspberry-lemon. I go outside of the box, but not crazy.”

Besides selling to her neighbors, Bella has fans who work for the city, too. “There was this one city workman who bought some cupcakes ands granola. Then he got on his radio and said, “Guys! You’ve gotta come down here!” says Bella. Her mom Jessica adds, “It was a treat for everyone. They enjoyed it and they made Bella feel really good.”

An entrepreneur who keeps it in the family

While Bella has taken ownership of her baking, it has been a family affair. She says her mom is an “amazing” baker, but credits the idea for selling her treats to her dad. “He’s in business. He said, ‘Bella, you could be an entrepreneur.’” She took his words to heart. Her younger brother also has a key position. “He’s my little publicist,” she says.

LLP Bella working

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Bella in action, carefully creating her delicious dog treats

Using her profits for another Laguna specialty: surfing

The success of her venture allowed her to set a goal for her profits: surf camp. The Ohio native wanted to learn how to surf. “I told my mom and dad that I wanted to do surf camp and that I was going to pay for it.” So she did. And while learning to surf wasn’t easy, the idea of giving up was never entertained. “It’s always better when you work for it because you stick with it,” she explains.

A surprisingly sound business philosophy for a 13-year-old

Despite all she has going on, Bella has plans to grow her business. “I want it to be pretty big,” she says. “I want to spread it to our city.” She plans to continue her sales at least every other weekend (water polo schedule permitting) when school resumes. She has an email address for orders: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., but after that she plans on just seeing what happens next. Her business strategy is relatively simple. “Just keep working hard. Have that mindset and always be patient. And be willing to put yourself out there,” she explains.

LLP Bellas treats

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One of Bella’s finished products

She offers such wisdom in a very matter-of-fact way. She is only 13, after all, so she has no idea how unusual her commitment to her goals is. Of course, her mom knows. “She’s very courageous. It’s amazing to watch. She is very inspiring for others. And she has a good voice for being courageous.” 

She is also a great example of just doing it because you want to. When she set up her table at Moulton, she had no idea how many people, if any, would show up. “At first you think no one is going to come. And then, later, some people come, and then more people come. You just have to wait it out,” explains Bella. Hard work, faith and patience are key ingredients to success. For Bella, it’s just one more recipe she has managed to perfect in a very short amount of time.


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Brittany Charnley: Hometown girl and blogger carries on Laguna traditions in a cool hip mom way

By DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

If readers recognize Brittany Charnley from her picture, it’s no surprise. From the moment she arrived here with her family as a two-year-old, she began a life-long (though she’s only 29) love affair with Laguna. It’s next to impossible to mention an activity offered in the city in which she hasn’t participated or a place at which she hasn’t worked or volunteered. The connections are as varied as they are endless, and as a result, Brittany is deeply embedded in Laguna’s culture, and it in her.

Her emotional ties to the City brought her back to Laguna after graduating from Pepperdine University in Malibu with a degree in Public Relations. But why return when so many young adults want to leave their hometowns, especially when the cost of living here is exorbitant? 

Love affair begins

Brittany says with obvious affection, “I love Laguna and the hometown feel.”

And it goes without saying, a big draw is that her parents are still nearby.

Although she wasn’t born here, she doesn’t remember living anywhere else. Her introduction to the City began after her parents, Michelle and Sam Clark, moved here from Denver with toddler Brittany and her older sister in tow. At that point, her dad’s career in the Navy had ended, and he went into equipment leasing. Her mother Michelle worked in Laguna’s Waste Management Department for 20 years and was also very involved with the Chamber of Commerce. 

Brittany Charney closeup

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This hometown girl loves her town

Brittany’s kinship to the town can be credited to her parents. Due to their busy careers, they put her in numerous programs and activities, and that’s when her relationship with Laguna began to form. She attended Anneliese Preschool, then went on to Top of the World and then Thurston, and graduated from Laguna Beach High School in 2007. 

During those years, she was a member of the Boys & Girls Club, winning the Member of the Year Award in 1999 (which means she’s always a member). She credits LBBGC with her love for sports. 

“That’s where I learned to play pool, and I’m a good player,” she says.

Also active in basketball at LBBGC, the high school basketball coach saw her playing and recruited her for the LBHS team. She ran track in high school as well, and participated in soccer, but it conflicted with basketball, so she had to make a choice, and basketball won. 

With the support of her parents, she excelled. Brittany says, “Although they worked, my parents attended all of my sporting events.”

No grass grew under her feet

Apparently, as a child, she was rarely idle. Her parents kept her busy, very busy, making sure she was jumping into all Laguna had to offer. Brittany joined Brownies and Girl Scouts, and also took dancing lessons at the community center (before it became Susi Q).

In 1996, when she was in first grade, she appeared in the painting “Sunday Morning” at Pageant of the Masters and made the cover of the program. Her mother was a volunteer backstage, working on headdresses. 

Brittany adds that Festival of Arts artist Michael Obermeyer appeared in the painting as her dad.

Although not during consecutive years, Brittany appeared five times in the Pageant, and then worked as an usher for a year. 

Brittany Charnley with family

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Kent, Blake, and Brittany enjoy a day in the park

The ties to the artistic community don’t stop there. From age 15-25, she worked summers at the Sawdust Festival at the Taco Bowl and Thasos restaurants. (Through the years, she’s also worked at other places around town: House of Big Fish, Nirvana Grille, and The Marine Room.) 

At the Sawdust, she came to know many of the exhibitors, and one in particular who played a pivotal role in Brittany’s important life events. A long-time Sawdust exhibitor, Mary Hurlbut, Stu News staff photographer, took Brittany and her husband Kent’s engagement and wedding pictures. And the ceremony was, where else, but at Hotel Laguna. 

For Brittany, it seems everything happens here in Laguna. She even met her husband Kent, who’s from Michigan, at Ocean Brewery. He’s worked all around town as well: Big Fish, zpizza, Banzai Bowl, and the Montage.

Creating a sense of community online with thecoolhipmom.com

In 2017, Brittany found a way to incorporate this hometown feel into a wonderful and beneficial enterprise. Last year, she launched her blog www.thecoolhipmom.com as a resource for parents and to create a sense of community among mothers and families in Orange County. Even before her two-year-old daughter Blake was born, Brittany had questions – What should I pack for the hospital? What about playgroups? How should I be feeling? – and nowhere to get answers from her peers.

In a sense, blogging is a way of alleviating isolation, and the response has been overwhelming. And although she wanted to be a television reporter when she was younger, she can now use this desire for reporting and storytelling in her blog posts.

“The response has been all positive,” says Brittany. “I’ve had no negative comments.”

Its focus is multi-faceted: Motherhood, Disneyland, Laguna Beach, and family fun. But it also includes social commentary and technology news. A few of the recent blogs topics have been: The Ultimate Kid Friendly City Guide to Laguna Beach, 12 Things You Must Do at the OC Fair with Your Toddler This Summer, LA Dance Project’s OC Debut, and One Hope and Global Genes’ New Wine Collaboration Helps to Support Rare Disease Patients. 

Brittany Charnley jumping

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Brittany jumps for joy in her new endeavor, OC Lifestyle and Mom Blog

The concept to initiate a blog came in a roundabout way. After Brittany became a mother, she met with a visiting college friend who mentioned, “You’re literally the same person. You haven’t changed.”

Brittany’s response was surprise, as if why wouldn’t I be? She admits, “There’s a misconception about how mothers are supposed to act. We can just be who we are, and I want to inspire and encourage moms to remain who they are.”

Much like her parents during her childhood, Brittany and Kent are now busy as well with their careers. She works full-time as the Director of Marketing for a private Christian school (with four campuses) in Yorba Linda. Kent is A/R Business Office Associate (in Finance) at Rock Harbor Church in Costa Mesa.

Passing on family traditions

Although Brittany’s blog is named “the cool hip mom,” she admits that’s not a self-proclaimed title, however, it seems a role she fits to a “T.” She’s already instilling in Blake a sense of community and tradition. Her daughter is attending the Anneliese Preschool just as Brittany did, and no doubt will go to the same elementary, middle, and high school, possibly even have the same teachers. 

Brittany says, “Many of the same teachers I had are still in the district, although they may have changed schools.”

Like Brittany, Blake also goes to Hospitality Night (Brittany holds fond memories of the karaoke at Hobie Surf Shop), park concerts, and the Patriots Day Parade in which Brittany rode on various floats during the years. 

Brittany Charnley walking

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Laguna will be home to old and new family traditions

The connections are endless.

Her parents are friends with Kelly Boyd, and she remembers spending the Fourth of July celebrations at the Boyds’ home. 

However, many young adults who were raised here and have good memories have moved away. (Her older sister now lives in Las Vegas.) So how many grads in Brittany’s high school class have stayed here or come back? 

After attending her 10-year LBHS reunion last year at the Hotel Laguna, Brittany says, “Many have stayed here, some are vendors at the Farmers’ Market or have other endeavors in town.” 

It’s not difficult to label Brittany a hometown girl; she knows this town inside and out. Yet even in her short 29 years, she’s witnessed changes. 

“I understand that the town must cater to tourists,” she says, “But the vibe still flourishes, and the City has stayed true to the heart of hometown, local feeling.”

She agrees that it’s a perfect place to raise her daughter, “The public schools are like private ones, and you can walk everywhere, and there are so many activities outside.”

A new generation grows up in Laguna

What wonderful traditions Brittany’s parents have passed on to her, and which she, in turn, will pass on to her daughter.

Her mother Michelle says, “We were super excited when Brittany decided to come back to Orange County and start her career and family. It brings us such joy and brings back the memories when we pick up our granddaughter from preschool.” 

Brittany says, “As my daughter grows up, I hope that the family atmosphere and spirit of community remains in Laguna and that she grows up to see how unique the
town truly is!”

Although Brittany may not claim to be a “cool hip mom,” from all accounts, she certainly appears to be. After all, she’s raising another hometown girl who, no doubt, will love Laguna just like her mom.


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Amy Eidt Jackson: Painter, teacher and tree hugger

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Amy Eidt Jackson says she did not know the alphabet when she entered first grade. This, despite her mother, a teacher, working diligently with her. “It was miserable for me,” she recalls. The thing that saved her was art. “I had an amazing art teacher. I excelled there. It was the only thing that gave me self-esteem as a child.” 

Finding confidence through art

Jackson managed to slog through elementary school to make it to a seventh interview with Harvard and an acceptance to Smith College. She decided to attend the University of Massachusetts for economic reasons. Clearly, whatever plagued her in her younger years she grew up to conquer. But it was art in those early years that gave her enough confidence to persevere.

10 years at the Sawdust Festival

Now in her 10th year of exhibiting her paintings at the Sawdust Festival, it is clear that the importance of art to her life has not diminished. In addition to exhibiting her paintings she also teaches art to children and adults, has a history of involvement with the Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Plein Air Painters Association, and other local arts organizations. 

LLP Jackson close up

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Amy Jackson, artist, educator and Laguna Beach resident

The fact that she is an exhibiting painter with her works in galleries in Los Angeles and Vence, France, where, Jackson tells me, Matisse retired, may seem like an obvious outcome for someone to whom art was such a salvation. However, her path to becoming an artist took some time.

Becoming an “artist” was not a goal out of college

Jackson studied art history, economics and fine art in college. She made a conscious choice not to become “an artist” because, she says, “I didn’t want to suffer.” After she graduated, the Massachusetts native spent time in Italy and England where she decided that being an art dealer would combine her talents and interests. Then her parents relocated from Massachusetts to Mission Viejo.

Mission Viejo is definitely not Laguna

Feeling like she was losing contact with her family, Jackson came west, too. Knowing that Mission Viejo was not going to win over their daughter’s heart, her parents took her to Laguna Beach and told her that it was Mission Viejo. That ruse didn’t last long, but blood is thicker than water and Jackson stayed anyway.

The Laguna Art Museum is the genesis of many lasting things

Eventually, Jackson moved to the real Laguna and got involved with the Laguna Art Museum. She met her husband on a blind date set up by friends she’d met at the museum. “It’s the genesis of a lot of great art programs as well as my marriage,” says Jackson of the museum with a laugh. 

Despite her involvement with the museum, Jackson’s career at the time was in interior design. By happy accident, Irene Updike, a well-known designer at the time and now a very well known author and speaker about the Holocaust, was her mentor. “It wasn’t my dream,” says Jackson of being a designer. “So I didn’t care about it. That made it really easy to succeed. As an artist I find it very difficult to sell my own work because it’s so important to me.”

Her children lead her to teaching art

When the third of her four children was born, Jackson stepped away from designing. This allowed her the time to begin painting in earnest. Her children got her involved in teaching art. She began working in their El Morro classrooms with a “Meet the Masters” program. When she moved her youngest child to the CLC program at Top of the World she began teaching there. Eventually, she says she was asked to step down. “I was too messy and unstructured,” she says with a shrug.

LLP Jackson studio

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Amy Jackson at work in her backyard studio

Surrounded by artists around her Laguna Beach home, Jackson credits them with motivating her to begin exhibiting at the Sawdust. “I have always loved the feel of the Sawdust and what it is about,” she says. She was painting on her own and very involved with LPAPA. “I was selling a lot of my work and I wanted a gallery space that was mine.” Taking a booth at the Sawdust checked all of those boxes.

Several years ago, Jackson began teaching art again, this time at St. Catherine’s in Laguna. “They wanted a more creative art program,” she says. Her program, called “Art Studio Education,” turns the classroom into an art studio. “I teach the kids the tools to express how they feel,” she says.

Teaching is a give and take

She takes her job as a teacher very seriously, even though it is very time consuming and cuts into her personal painting time. “It takes away,” she admits. “But it also gives back.”

Jackson will be teaching two classes at the Sawdust this summer. The first one, “The Language of Landscape Painting” is a color theory class that will be held this Wednesday. 

A love for Laguna’s trees leads to a stylistic shift in her painting

While Jackson is known as a plein air painter, her style has evolved over the last few years. She credits her newfound passion for saving Laguna’s trees with helping her transformation to a more abstract style. “It’s interesting that my interest in trees brought me to paint horizons and not trees,” she says laughing. 

She has an ambitious plan for helping save Laguna’s trees. Jackson wants to organize a “tree hugger” event. “One of my biggest passions is to have a paint-off of our beautiful trees. We can sell the paintings to buy plaques to present to people who have a heritage tree on their property. I’m hoping to do this next year,” she says enthusiastically.

LLP Sawdust booth

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Amy Jackson’s booth at the Sawdust holds a good representation of her work

More ambitious plans for art education

For now, Jackson has her hands full manning her booth at the Sawdust, teaching her classes and making plans to open an art school at her Back Bay studio. “I’m looking to create art studio education in Back Bay, but I’m also looking to foster more creative arts programs in schools.”

And, of course, she will continue to paint. Influenced by Matisse and Wolf Kahn, as well as street art, Jackson says, “I want my art to be something that speaks to people and gives them joy. I know that sounds trite, but I want everyone to recognize their own voice. A lot of people have started paining at my encouragement,” she says. And it’s easy to see why. 

While Jackson certainly knows the “rules” of painting, she is definitely not bound by them. Her methods may be “messy” and “unstructured,” but isn’t that the fun of it all?

“Art has that magic ability to turn places around,” she says. What it can do for places, it can also clearly do for people. 


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Master of the Pageant? That would be Diane Challis Davy, long-time director of the show

Story by MARRIE STONE

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Diane Challis Davy’s mind must work like a carefully curated museum. If we could wander around inside, I imagine we’d find vast halls filled with classic paintings, marble sculptures, antique clocks, and art deco furniture. Chamber music might swell at any moment – maybe a minuet or an occasional Beach Boys song. I picture long corridors of mental rooms where costume makers sew taffeta gowns, makeup artists apply their magic, and set designers paint every blade of grass with precision. Diane, known as “Dee Dee” or “Dee” amongst associates and friends, has not only been the director and producer of the Pageant of the Masters for 23 years, she’s been the visionary, the overseer, and its chief cheerleader.

The longest running director in the Pageant’s 85-year history, and one of only a small handful of women in that role, Dee imprinted both her vision and passion on the Pageant and made it utterly her own. “I can think of no one more perfect for the position,” says Dan Duling, the 38-year veteran scriptwriter for the Pageant. “She grew up in Laguna, studied theatre and art, volunteered in the Pageant, learned all she could about every aspect of theatre during her education at Laguna Beach High and later CalArts, and proved herself capable behind the scenes at the Pageant, mastering every facet of production.”

It takes a unique personality, and a complicated mixture of skills, to wear so many simultaneous hats and wear them all equally well. Dee has mastered the art.

LLP dee dee

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Diane Challis Davy, aka Dee Dee, aka Dee

The art of organizing art

The notion of orchestrating the Pageant around a chosen theme was Dee’s brainchild. Prior to her involvement, the show was simply an assemblage of random pieces of art produced by “masters.” The only exception was the 1976 Bicentennial show. That show, its theme and its organizational structure, inspired Dee. Now the theme is selected more than a full year in advance. In fact, “Time Machine” has already been announced as the 2019 theme.

“It’s been a godsend for writing and researching the show, as well as for marketing each year as being fresh and worth coming back to see what’s next,” says Duling. “I think of it as looking at art through different prisms, and sometimes being able to re-approach a piece we’ve done before but from such a different angle and storytelling perspective that it feels brand new.”

So when Malcolm Warner, Executive Director of the Laguna Beach Art Museum, approached Dee last year to suggest the Pageant commemorate the Laguna Beach Art Association’s 100th anniversary, the spark for this year’s theme ignited. “Dee was very interested in our 1930s model of the original LBAA art gallery, and worked hard to include it in the program,” says Janet Blake, Curator of Historical Art at the Laguna Art Museum. “It’s a great tribute to the LBAA, which we really appreciate.”

LLP lineup of scenes

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Dee surveys the lineup of scenes for the Pageant

In many ways, Dee’s role seems as much curator as director. “I see a curator as a catalyst, generator and motivator,” Hans-Ulrich Obrist, art historian and critic, once said. “A sparring partner…and a bridge builder, creating a bridge to the public.” I don’t know if Dee would agree, but decades of sold-out shows suggest she’s built innumerable bridges.

Making the magic happen

How does Dee do it, year after year? “You have to be aware and open to new ideas,” she says. “With Google, it’s easy to dream on different subjects, and easy to do research. In the 1980s and early ‘90s, it was a lot of trekking to the library.”

Once she settles on a theme, a group of volunteer research committee members begin their annual competition for selecting the pieces of work. They take the theme title and start making suggestions. “It’s a competitive game we play, the 80 to 100 people who sign up to make recommendations vie to get their work in the show.” Dee holds a “show and tell” meeting in September, allowing every member to argue their case for a piece of art. 

“Dee and I have the most fun…when we start kicking ideas around, daring each other to try things we’ve never tried before, looking for as fresh a variety of elements as we can,” says Duling. “We put things on the board, rearrange them endlessly, the reject pile gets bigger and bigger, and just when we think we’ve come up with a great show with a beginning, middle and end, we pick it apart and make it even better.” 

“Hundreds of images are emailed,” says Dee. “They have to be analyzed based on whether they will be presentable on the stage, whether they can be reproduced.” Then they must be sequenced. “We like to move the show from side stage to roof to garden. We make a program that has movement and good pacing.” 

Selections are made in late October, and the launch party occurs in November. By January, the cast is selected and rehearsals are underway every Thursday evening (rain, shine, wind or frigid air) until the Pageant debuts in June. “June is panic time,” Dee says. “We rehearse like mad. We bring in the professional orchestra and rehearse four times with them.”

The surrounding neighborhood always gets a sneak peak. “They heard music by the Beach Boys this year and got pretty excited,” she laughs.

The importance of surprise

The goal is to keep the show fresh, interesting and exciting. That might mean a gondola floating into the audience, an unexpected ambush by Native American Indians, or a horse galloping across the stage. The audience should expect something new, year after year.

And, because it’s live theater, anything can happen at anytime. Surprises aren’t always reserved for the audience. Once, a skunk wreaked havoc in the orchestra pit. More recently, a posse of raccoons fought so loud in the bushes, it became a significant distraction. Then there were those “privacy patches” that failed to adhere. And a marble sculpture who fell from his perch and was forced to crawl off stage. Of course there’s always the child actor who wiggles or giggles. 

“These are some of the audience’s favorite moments,” says Dee.  Of course, she’s right. Art is best when it’s fun, and even better when it’s unpredictably funny. When art is relatable and human, full of frailties, vulnerabilities and surprises, the audience feels as much participant as observer. They know they’re seeing something unique and special, just for them.

llp boat scene

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The audience loves to see the secrets behind the “living painting” – this one is "Catching Fish at the Beach" by Franz A Bischoff

And, of course, context is everything. “Dee and I share a deep fascination with the psychology of time and the paramount importance of context,” says Duling. “Context can make a tragic image funny, a comic motif painfully sad, a failed life a personal success, a simple gesture a life-changing moment.”

If you build it, they will volunteer

The Pageant of the Masters has operated under the philosophy, “If you build it, they will come” for 85 years. Not only does the amphitheater sell out night after night, but the volunteer staff grows year after year, swelling now to over 500 members. Of an original pool of 1,300 in the initial casting call, only 450 people are chosen. A full two-thirds are turned away. There are two rotating casts of roughly 150 people each, as well as substitutes and understudies.

“Volunteer sign-ups have continued to grow during Dee’s tenure,” says Duling. “The volunteer research committee was once a handful of folks looking to take part in the earliest stages of the creative process. Now it numbers over 100 members. This is all because Dee knows that the more involved people are, the more the show’s success will mean to all involved. She leads by enthusiasm, example and a superhuman work ethic. And she does it with grace, style and a wicked sense of humor.”

I ask Dee what contributes to this enthusiasm. “It’s the cachet of being at the beach in Laguna. It’s tradition. Plus people are fun backstage,” she says. “They love to meet lifelong friends. Generations of families participate – little kids and grandparents. It’s a generational mix and people just love to be there.” 

Dee met her own husband during the show. In the early 1980s, Steve Davy came as a guest of local photographer Rick Lang. He met Dee backstage and then, a second time, when Dee entered his antique shop to have a Chinese screen repaired. They began dating then, and went on to have their only son, Tommy Davy. 

How frequent are those marriages and connections at the Pageant? Dee laughs. Two years ago, Dan Duling did an entire article for the souvenir book on the many connections forged at the Pageant.

The enduring gifts of Dee and the masters

Dee has a ribbon of nostalgia that runs right through her core. She recently moved into the apartment over her father’s old art gallery. The Patriots Day Parade is her favorite annual event, along with the Pageant of the Monsters (held once every five years). “I’m really into the nostalgic local traditions,” she says. 

I suspect that streak plays a critical role in her success. Along with her love for theater, art and costume design, Dee’s passion for connecting the audience to the past, as well as fostering lifelong bonds within the community, is what makes the Pageant both emotional and beloved, whether one is spectator, cast or crew. 

“This is where we live,” says Duling. “In a theatre of art, telling stories abetted by surprising, original music, and using stage illusions to reveal what the Pageant has always been about at its core: a testimonial to art’s inclusiveness, the belief that it has something for all of us. Endlessly simple, mind-bogglingly complex.”


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SliDawg: An enviable life of adventure

By SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

When Steven “SliDawg” Chew’s family home burned down in the ‘93 Laguna Beach fire, he says, “It kind of freed me.” His family basically lost all of their possessions, though the family has since rebuilt. “It taught me that all we really have is family and friends. Nothing can burn those down. I became less materialistic.”

This became a seminal event in Chew’s life. Born and raised in Laguna, Chew went through Laguna’s schools and surfed Laguna’s beaches as a kid. He was on the NSSA National Team in high school and when he graduated he had to make a choice: go to college or try to become a professional surfer. He chose the former and headed off to San Diego State to study painting.

A trip to Bali is life changing

The year of the fire, he was in his last year at San Diego State. He didn’t go back for his final year. Instead, he got a job designing for the brand World Jungle. This led to an opportunity to create a line for a Japanese brand, Roar. 

“I made some money. So I went to Bali for two months. I got some incredible waves,” he says. “It changed my life.”

LLP SliDawg Chew

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Steven “SliDawg” Chew

 Bali was life changing for Chew because it instilled in him a bug for travel that has yet to release its grip. Since then he has managed to live an enviable life of surfing and travel and he has no intention of changing lanes anytime soon.

Surf camp, Tavarua, and Purple Corduroy

Chew funds his travel with two steady gigs: he runs the SliDawg Surf Camp through Laguna Surf and Sport in the summer, and he works as a lifeguard on the Fijian island of Tavarua in the winter. Designing t-shirts is still a passion (he is currently working with Soul Project and Laguna Surf and Sport, among others), and he is a partner in the wine label Purple Corduroy. As I said, it’s hard not to envy Chew’s lifestyle.

LLP SliDawg Waves

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SliDawg’s surf campers hit the waves in Laguna

The surf school he now runs was originally started by Billabong and headed by one of their team riders, Donovan Frankenreiter. When Frankenreiter’s music career took off they asked Chew to take over. He has been running it for the last 17 years. “It has always been like a fun summer job,” he says. “Every year it gets more and more fun.”

When asked what’s the biggest change he made to the program since taking it over, he laughs and says, “I got more help!”

Surf Coach of the Year

The camp is incredibly popular. Last summer, there were weeks when Chew says he was “overwhelmed” with kids just showing up. “I can’t take 50 kids to the beach!” he says shaking his head. 

Even when 75 percent of the kids who attend are local, they still need attention and supervision. He no longer needs to advertise. People just find him. Chew was voted “Surf Coach of the Year” by OC Weekly. (This means his sessions fill up fast, so make sure there’s room before you send your kids).

It’s no wonder Chew’s camp is in such high demand. His genuine enjoyment at being in the water day in and day out with the kids is obvious. ”We have a lot of fun,” he says. “If I’m not having fun then the kids aren’t having fun!”

LLP SliDawg Camp

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Everyone has fun at surf camp! 

And there seems little chance that Chew is not going to enjoy himself.

After surf camp, the next adventures begin

When surf camp is over in September, Chew’s next adventure is in Pahones, in Costa Rica. He says it’s the “longest left” in the world. “I’m a goofy foot and that’s good for left point breaks. It’s really beautiful and rustic, lots of wildlife.” He plans to stay for at least a month. In October he will head to Tavarua to lifeguard and stay through December. 

Fiji is a special place for Chew. “It’s hard to beat Fiji,” he explains. “They’re the nicest, warmest, funniest people. After 20 years, it’s all about the Fijians.” 

This past year he went from Fiji to New Zealand with his old high school friend and Foo Fighters’ drummer, Taylor Hawkins. “We spent a month there. It was super beautiful.” 

He also recently taught Google founder Larry Page’s kids to surf. “They flew me and my crew to Fiji. I taught them how to surf. They’re not the computer nerds you’d think; they’re super active. They were helping save sea turtles, pretty down to earth people,” he says. 

I would be writing page after page if I detailed all of the adventures Chew mentioned to me. Suffice it to say, not all trips have been surf trips, although it is definitely a theme. “The ocean and my surf board are my lover,” he says. He found this out when he decided it was time to “get serious.” 

Growing up is overrated

“In 2004 I was like, ‘Alright, it’s time to find the gal, have the family, get the solid job.’ I tried that for three to four years, and I found that being a grown up is overrated. I do have Peter Pan Syndrome, but there’s no time to waste in this life.” So, he has tried to follow his dad’s advice and be a “well-rounded” person. 

And while acknowledging that not everyone is suited for his globetrotting ways, he is a strong advocate for travel in general. “I’ve never met a racist traveler. It opens you up.”

Despite his love for seeing the world, Chew isn’t ready to become an ex-pat anytime soon. “I don’t want to turn my paradise into a bitter place. And I’ve seen that happen a lot,” he says. “I like to spend at least two to three weeks, get the local vibe and then move on.” 

When he has finished moving on, he always comes back to Laguna. He knows home is where the heart is, “Laguna is the best home base ever. I get sad when I fly into LA, but once I’m in Laguna it’s all good.” 

And as good as Laguna may be, Chew will nevertheless head off for another adventure, only to come back and do it all over again.


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Dr. Jerry Tankersley: After 46 years the time has come to say goodbye to Laguna Presbyterian

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Dr. Jerry Tankersley preached his last sermon at the Laguna Presbyterian Church last Sunday. After 46 years at the church, Dr. Tankersley leaves large shoes for his congregation to fill. 

As for why now, Dr. Tankersley says, “Well, I think I’ve accomplished what I set out to do when I came here.” However, he acknowledges that while he may be ready to pursue other things, “The work of the church goes on and on. We’re always redefining ourselves. We’re always asking ourselves where the spirit is leading us.”

Retiring but the work won’t stop

That drive forward is certainly not halting with Dr. Tankersley’s retirement. He has every intention to continue his life’s work. “I am going to have to find other places to teach. I’ll have plenty of opportunities to use whatever gifts God has given me. It’s a whole new mindset. I’ve got to find a new definition for what it means to continue to serve.” 

In his role at the Presbyterian Church, Dr. Tankersley has found many ways to serve, both far and near. This, plus the fact that he finds Laguna a very stimulating place, is what has cemented his longevity. 

“I came here when I was 35 years old. It has been such an exciting place. All the major events of American culture through the past 50 years have blown through Laguna,” he says. 

This is important because, according to Dr. Tankersley, the Presbyterian Church is a socially engaged church. “We are a denomination that takes on major issues: war, peace, human sexuality…The church came to America in the 1600s. It has been a part of every major debate in the history of this country.”

LLP Tankersley close up

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Dr. Jerry Tankersley, lead pastor of Laguna Presbyterian Church for the past 46 years, is retiring

This would explain the depth and breadth of Dr. Tankersley’s service. Back in the 1980s, for example, he was named the first pastor to serve on the AIDS task force by Laguna’s mayor. “That was very rewarding,” he says. 

And that kind of reach has continued ever since.

A reach that has extended far beyond the walls of the church

As far as his activities outside of Laguna, Dr. Tankersley rattles off a list of mission trips and exchanges he has led over the years, in Mexico City, East Africa, India, Israel, Palestine, Romania; returning to some of these places multiple times. Each trip had a specific purpose – rebuilding an orphanage, ministering to recovering lepers, establishing a Presbytery. He describes them all as “wonderful,” “meaningful,” and “fascinating.” 

Getting exposure on a national stage

In addition, Dr. Tankerlsey has been able to work with the Presbytery at a national level. In 2002, he was “drafted” to stand for moderator of the 214th General Assembly. “Thankfully,” he says, “I was not elected, but it opened doors for me.” 

These “openings” allowed him to get involved with issues surrounding Israel and Palestine as well as building relationships with other Christians as well as Jews and Muslims. 

He also worked on the Belhar Confession. 

“After eight years, the General Assembly adopted it,” he says. “It deals with race and racism. That was a very rewarding experience. I grew up in Texas during the time of separate but equal, so it is an important issue for me.” 

For someone with a PhD in Government, these extracurricular activities clearly added more stimulation to an already invigorating career.

There were times of restlessness

This is not to say that Dr. Tankersley never thought about leaving Laguna. He says he got a bit “restless” when he was 45-55 years old. Other churches, larger churches, had contacted him and tried to woo him away. 

“I visited. I thought it through. I prayed it through,” he says. “I didn’t see a church that could match this one. After I flirted with these other situations, I finally decided ‘I’m going to go for broke and go deeper here (in Laguna). If they decide they no longer want me, so be it.’ That day never came.”

Leaving on his own terms

Because “that” day never came Dr. Tankersley has the luxury of leaving on his own terms. Big projects, like the $15 million retrofitting of the church he undertook have been seen to completion. “We have paid all the bills,” he says. “The church is debt free.”

If it was otherwise, one gets the sense Dr. Tankerlsey might feel there was still unfinished business to deal with. Now, with no major loose ends, the time is right to retire. 

LLP Tankersley family

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Dr. Jerry Tankersley and his family celebrate his last sermon at Laguna Presbyterian

As he reflects on the past 46 years, Dr. Tankersley says, “It all went so quickly!” 

He remembers when he first came to Laguna. “I came trembling,” he says. But he was embraced. “There are a lot of churches that devour pastors. This is not that kind of church. It builds pastors. There is so much gracious support. In the 100 years of this church, I am only the third long-term pastor. It has a way of absorbing your life. If you come here, you better plan on staying.”

A future filled with work and a little relaxation

Dr. Tankersley would like to spend his future reading and writing. He has volumes of sermons to organize and even books to write. 

“I hope to have some opportunity to smell the flowers,” he adds. “I am looking forward to enjoying Laguna, walking on the beach, looking out at the hills.” 

He says he’d also like to travel, but sadly his wife had a stroke last year. She continues to recover, so those plans will have to wait until she is ready.

“It’s a mystery how my life has played out the way it has,” he says. He certainly never thought he’d stay in Laguna for 46 years. In fact, at one point in his life, he wasn’t sure he’d be welcomed back to the church at all. 

Finding grace in the church when he most needed it

As a young man, Dr. Tankersley was divorced, and this is not something the church takes lightly. “I thought my life was over,” he explains. “Then I experienced the grace of God.” 

At the time he was connected with the Presbyterian Church in La Cañada. The pastor there had, according to Dr. Tankersley, a “similar experience.” Dr. Tankerlsey was pleased to find his life in the church was far from over. He was embraced, and that experience has never left him. 

 “People need a church that is filled with grace. I don’t recommend it [divorce], but it happens.” He explains that when he stood for Moderator during the General Assembly he told his fellow pastors. “I wanted them to know me,” he says. “This has become part of my style. I try to be transparent about who I am.”

LLP Tankersley preaching

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Dr. Jerry Tankersley preaching his final sermon on Sunday

“People know I’m quite serious about my own spiritual life,” he adds.  “I not only want to talk the talk, but also walk the walk.”

After 46 years, still striving to improve his message and messaging

Dr. Tankerlsey’s quest for openness and grace is a consistent theme in his sermons. However, there have been stylistic changes over the years, if not thematic ones. When he first started preaching, he says he was very concerned about “literary precision.” In 1990, he decided to preach from the center of the church. “That has brought a dynamism,” he says. Now, he says, “I feel like my preaching is at a whole new place. It has a depth I didn’t have in the early days.” 

Even so, after all these years, Dr. Tankersley feels he is still honing his craft.  “I’m still trying to interpret text and be faithful to the story and also preach in a relevant way to the congregants. You never feel you’re adequate for it.” 

Clearly, his longevity would indicate he has not been “adequate,” but, rather, exceptional.


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Sheila Bushard-Jamison: It’s all in the family

Story by SAMANTHA WASHER

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

Bushard’s Pharmacy is part of the fabric of Laguna. That happens when a business thrives as long as Bushard’s has. Joe and Mary Bushard came to Laguna Beach in 1942. In 1960, after renting several spaces, Joe built his pharmacy on Forest Ave. where it still is today. 

From father to daughter

The Bushard’s daughter Shelia, now Sheila Bushard-Jamison, has followed in their footsteps, running the business both with a partner, as well as alone for the past 30 years. To keep the family business going was definitely not part of a master plan. Bushard-Jamison had other ideas for her life when she earned a masters degree in Environmental Science. But, she recalls good-naturedly, “I couldn’t get a job! My dad’s manager had sadly just had a stroke. He needed my help.” So she jumped in.

It was definitely not a foreign place. Bushard-Jamison had worked at the pharmacy in some capacity since she was 13. “My dad trusted me, obviously. And when he was ready to retire I took over in 1986. My partner at the time, Tony D’Altorio, was the pharmacist and we were partners for 22 years. He passed away in 2007, so since then, I’ve been on my own.” At least she was.

LLP Jamison closeup

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Shelia Bushard-Jamison, owner of Bushard’s Pharmacy, a Laguna Beach institution

Now a mother-daughter team

In 2010, Bushard’s daughter Marisa graduated with a business degree from Loyola Marymount University. The business climate back then was extremely rough for just about everyone, especially new graduates. This prompted Bushard-Jamison to ask her daughter if she wanted to come work with her. “She embraced it,” says Bushard- Jamsion. “She likes the business side of it. She’s so much more tech savvy than I am. And, a lot of my customers are aging. We have to keep the younger ones coming in.”

So, despite a lack of intention, it seems as though this family business will stay in the family for quite some time. Marisa is ready to take the reins, according to her mother, but it doesn’t sound like Bushard-Jamison is ready to “cut the leash” just yet. 

And this dynamic makes Bushard’s a rather unique place. It is definitely a modern pharmacy, but there is a palpable nostalgia one feels upon entering. Maybe it’s the building? Maybe it’s the employees, some of whom have worked there 20+ years? Maybe it’s how everyone knows your name when you come in? It is probably all of these things, and then there are the M & M’s.

A commitment to customers – and M & M’s

Bushard-Jamsion says she started putting a dish of M & M’s at the pharmacy counter many years ago. Her partner Tony was not a fan – at first. “Then he started buying them!” laughs Bushard-Jamison “I have to make sure we have enough all the time. I’m running to Costco to keep our stash full.”  The candy, small as it is, says a lot about the way Bushard-Jamison runs her business. People come in and have a few M & M’s, even if they’re not there to buy anything. “It’s fun to visit and catch up. We try to make people happy and have a good time. We always try to take extra care. We each have a group of people we know really well, and it’s really great to see them when they come in.”

Known for their perfumes, among other things

Another Bushard’s trademark is the perfume. People check in from all over the country in order to pick up a favorite fragrance that they can’t find anywhere else. “It’s so funny,” explains Bushard-Jamison. “Mitzi Interlandi…she started working here and was totally into fragrances. She created relationships with these companies, and it just kept building.” Interlandi came to work in 1980, retired in 2008, but not before she trained her replacement who now knows as much as her mentor.

LLP mother daughter

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The dynamic duo: Marisa Bushard-Jamison with her mother Shelia in front of their family-owned and managed business

While Bushard’s definitely echoes some of the better things from the past, it is not stuck there. Every Bushard who has been involved in the pharmacy has demonstrated innovative thinking. Joe Bushard fought the city to build the breezeway that connects the parking lot on Ocean to Forest Ave. “Can you imagine?” muses Bushard-Jamison at the thought of that ubiquitous pathway not existing. 

A voice for local merchants

While very active over the years with the Chamber of Commerce, Bushard-Jamison herself tried several different ideas to help keep locals shopping in town. She, like all Laguna residents, realizes the town is up against a fierce adversary: lack of parking. 

To combat locals’ inclination to head to a mall, Bushard-Jamison says they tried the  “Our Town Until 10:00” where businesses were encouraged to open early so locals could shop before the crowds came. She also helped convince the city that the parking meters should be for three hours instead of two. “You can’t go to lunch, look around and maybe do some shopping in two hours,” she explains. But the problem is only getting worse and that worries Bushard-Jamison. “I don’t think there’s a long-term plan and that concerns me.”

Deliveries help customers get what they need

 With that in mind, Bushard-Jamison decided the pharmacy needed to start making deliveries. “People who can’t get here or don’t want to try and get here, they still need their medicines. We deliver six days a week.” And as with all good business owners, when something needs to get done, sometimes you have to do it yourself. Her driver was going to be unavailable this weekend which means Bushard-Jamison was taking over. Driving on a weekend in full summer traffic is no picnic, but Bushard-Jamison was sanguine. Small business owners must wear many hats.

A family with deep roots in Laguna

And if there was an award the “The Most Local Family” of all local families in Laguna, the Bushard-Jamison’s would be hard to beat. Bushard-Jamison’s husband was also born in Laguna. His father was a member of Laguna Beach High School’s first graduating class. Both sets of in-laws were friends despite the children not meeting one another until college. This is because Bushard-Jamison went to a private school in Anaheim. She says her parents weren’t thrilled about Timothy Leary’s presence in Laguna and decided it was safer to send her away. After college, Bushard-Jamison says she traveled a lot, but never considered leaving Laguna. At the time, she didn’t want to leave her boyfriend. Since the two have now been married for 38 years, it seems like she made a smart choice. 

LLP Bushards breezeway

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The front of Bushard’s Pharmacy and its connecting breezeway that Jack Bushard fought for back in the late 1950’s

As a Laguna Beach native, Bushard-Jamison has watched her hometown evolve from an idyllic beach community to a world-class tourist destination. Talking with her about the old days, it’s easy to feel a sense of longing for what things were like then. “When I was a kid there were cows grazing in the canyon,” she says. Everything anyone needed could be found downtown, according to Bushard-Jamison. There were shops along the boardwalk (before Main Beach park was created) and Allen Cadillac sold its cars between Oak and Brooks Streets. And you could make it from point A to point B considerably quicker. Times have certainly changed.

What has not changed is how Bushard-Jamison values her customers who were once her father’s customers, and who will eventually be her daughter’s customers (and possibly her son’s, though he is currently enrolled in film school). This continuity is not something she takes for granted. “My dad loved Laguna. He was very encouraging for me to take over and that was a blessing. We’re all very blessed to live here, and I’m really lucky to still have this store.” 

Bushard-Jamison may call it luck, but luck isn’t delivering prescriptions over a sunny, tourist-packed weekend.


Laguna Logo

David Koning: With only half a heart, he does nothing half-heartedly 

Story by DIANNE RUSSELL

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

When someone introduces himself with, “I am the only kid in the world that has a half of heart that is over the age of 31. I was dead for six minutes and came back to life four times,” it gets your attention. That’s David Koning’s opening line when he contacts people to make things happen and tell his story. And evidently, it gets everyone’s attention. 

As a result of his countless telephone calls, he’s appeared on Fox News, Good Day LA, The Today Show, and ESPN, to name only a few, and has been interviewed for every newspaper in Orange County. Contrary to what one might expect, he doesn’t get nervous. “I crave it,” he says. After 30 calls to Family Feud, he finally got his family on the television show. No obstacle is insurmountable, it seems.

Thirty-one-year-old Koning may have been born with only half a heart, but he does nothing halfway. Without exception, everyone at Glennwood Housing, an independent living facility serving special needs adults 18 through 59, where he’s lived for the past five months, agrees on his outgoing, upbeat personality, humor, and his ability to connect with people. And, most importantly, to get what he wants. Doggedly persistent, in his mind, nothing is unattainable.

The fact that he’s even here is a stunning example of turning the impossible into the possible.

Facing the impossible 

 David was born prematurely with hypoplastic left-heart syndrome, which meant he was missing the left ventricle. He was not expected to survive. His parents Chris and Pam, already with a three- and five-year-old at home, were given a short list of options: let him die, try experimental heart surgery or wait for a transplant. 

His mother Pam says, “We wanted to do everything possible, with no regrets.”

When David was one week old, they took him to Philadelphia for the experimental heart surgery. He spent several months in the hospital (his mother at his side) and subsequent surgeries followed. During the third surgery, when he was less than two years old, he suffered a cardiac arrest and was without oxygen for six minutes. 

Pam says, “Only a very small percentage of children survive cardiac arrest.” As a result, he developed cerebral palsy and seizures.

Given his time in the hospital, one wonders how he developed his amazing verbal skills. Pam says, “The hospital is where he learned to communicate. He spent months there, and the staff and doctors would come by and talk to him.”

LLP David Koning with parents

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David with his parents, Pam and Chris

Home schooled for five years, when his parents moved the family from San Jose to Laguna, David started Thurston Middle School. In 2007, he graduated from Laguna Beach High School with a diploma, not with a certificate of completion. He was mainstreamed during his school career, and not only was the 2007-2008 yearbook dedicated to him, he marched down the aisle at graduation right behind the valedictorian.

His mother gives the highest praise to the school and the principal at LBHS at the time, Nancy Blade, who not only stepped in to make sure he received a diploma and not just a certificate of completion, but tutored him in algebra. During his time at LBHS, he was busy as the team manager for both boys and girls volleyball, and could often be found having lunch surrounded by volleyball players.

Why Glennwood, why now?

At the beginning of this year, David decided he wanted to move out of his parents’ home. “I wanted some independence away from Mom and Dad.”

“We chose Glennwood because it’s a smaller group home. It’s a beautiful property with a great atmosphere and staff, and it’s near our home,” says Pam. “Caring permeates this town. I’m so thankful he’s in Laguna.”

Glennwood’s Chief Operating Officer, Faith Manners says, “David has a fantastic ability to connect with people in the community, and if Glennwood ever gets a news channel of our own, he would certainly have the skills to deliver as an on-air anchor for us! I think his confidence and quick wit have served him very well in his life, and he certainly has a tenacity that is impressive to many of us that know and love him. 

David grew up locally and so he has a real connection here in Laguna and in Orange County in general. We welcome his energy and enthusiasm and we are really grateful that he has joined our community at Glennwood House.”

Doesn’t take no for an answer

“A phone in my hand is a dangerous weapon,” says Koning, who spends hours on the phone each day getting things done – talking to the Mayor of Anaheim about the Ducks, contacting heads of corporations about what they’re doing to help the disabled, matching corporations with disabled organizations, and currently, persuading local businesses to donate items for the silent auction for Glennwood’s upcoming fundraising event. 

LLP David Koning looking down

Click on photo for larger image

David makes the impossible, possible

“I don’t take no for an answer,” he says.

And that philosophy has paid off. His tenaciousness resulted in meeting Dr. Phil (“I know a lot of people in the TV world,” David says) and several NBA players, including Charles Barkley and Shaquille O’Neal. In 2008, David started Changing Children’s Lives, an outreach for disabled and troubled youths, which connects sports teams with charities to provide tickets to sporting events. The concept developed during a business trip with his dad to New York, when he called the Mets, and got tickets to a game for the Boy and Girls Club. 

Zest for communication

His father Chris admits, “David has a zest for communication.” And not just the goal oriented kind. He has a knack for drawing out the other Glennwood residents as well and has been put in a leadership role. His verbal skills must be instinctive, because Pam says that as they traveled all over the world, he would make friends with cruise crewmembers. He likes traveling, “Once you get used to it, it’s fun,” he says.

He also has a zest for writing. David says, “I am writing seven books right now, and I have finished one of them. It’s a children’s book about a disability dog.”

Besides his love of writing and talking on the telephone, David loves basketball, the Lakers and Warriors (his dad is a big basketball fan), and hockey, especially the Ducks. Through phone contact, he has gotten to know the Anaheim Mayor, and he gives David tickets and use of the Mayor’s Suite for games.

 His interest in basketball started early. Pam says, “When David was a toddler in the hospital (he didn’t walk until the age of four), they put him in with blind kids to play basketball (the nets had beepers), and he would steal the basketball.” 

Basketball and good friends

Now David shares his love of basketball with one of his close friends. A student at Regis University in Denver, Chandler White will be soon be transferring to Chapman College in Orange. He met David through their mothers, and Chandler and David frequently play basketball together. 

Chandler says, “He’s a great friend, entertaining and energetic. I’ve never seen him down, he is always upbeat and easy to be around. I can always count on him to brighten my day.” 

Of course, David is hoping that Chandler will make it to the NBA. 

Chandler adds, “David is very smart and super encouraging. He’s my biggest supporter and always in my corner.”

When he can, Chandler reciprocates by watching David play on the Special Olympics Basketball Team, The Irvine Eagles, where’s he known to have a great three point shot.

Popular with Glennwood residents and staff

During our conversation, Glennwood staff members drift in and out, offering comments: With 45 residents and 20 staff members (some who are around David’s age), David has plenty of people to share conversations with. And it’s obvious, everyone loves having him around.

LLP David Koning shooting basket

Click on photo for larger image

David nails the shot – all net

“David has been a great addition. He helps plan events and makes things happen, and he’s funny and entertaining,” says staff member Heather McGough.

Molly Minikey, another staff member adds, “He’s a unique person, very outgoing. Whenever you’re feeling low, he cheers you up. He’s very talkative, and can always make you laugh. And he loves Kobe.” 

Staffer Kyle Mayor says, “He likes to hold conversations. I think that’s a good thing.”

And all say he’s a big dancer. To celebrate birthdays, Glennwood throws parties and provides a DJ for dancing. Considering the number of residents (and staff), that’s a lot of parties.

David has garnered the attention of one resident in particular, and apparently, the feeling is mutual. Kelly was a guest of the Konings for a family dinner on Mother’s Day. 

Chandler says, “David called me the night before and said he wanted to sing Kelly a song on Mother’s Day. And he sang the song ‘My Heart Will Go On’ from Titanic. He has a good voice.” 

Konings host residents on Sundays

The Konings also host residents every other Sunday afternoon for ice cream sundaes. All residents are invited, and it’s clear by the greetings and hugs when Pam arrives at Glennwood, that she is considered everyone’s surrogate mother. 

Pam says, “I love these kids. They’re so sweet. They grow on you.”

Resident Spencer Vanduzer, who has two jobs, at Gelson’s and Panera, says, “David’s a great friend. He likes to talk about sports. He’s funny.”

Although Glennwood has a work program and encourages residents to have a job (two in Spencer’s case), David has yet to find one, and is still looking. Instead each day, he visits Harbor House in Laguna Niguel and participates in enrichment programs. 

Franklin Casco, the Jesus Coach from The Holy Spirit Broadcasting Network, who has known David for seven years, sums up what everyone else has said, “David Koning is a great young man, and he’s overcome some serious adversities. He’s inspiring to be around.”

A fighting spirit

Max Trueblood, who is acquainted with David through an exchange four years ago regarding relocating the Clippers to Anaheim, tweets for David and links his story to sports contacts. Max knows first-hand of David’s resolution. “I got 15 calls from him in one day.” 

He continues, “David is very persistent, but what people need to understand is that if he didn’t have this instinct, maybe he wouldn’t have survived. The fighting spirit kept him alive.”

It’s clear that although David has survived unfathomable difficulties, he’s also experienced many victories. He has the support of wonderful parents, his brother Michael and sister Michelle, and he has no lack of good friends, inside and outside of Glennwood. Through his diligence, he’s made incredible contacts and provided hope and assistance to those with disabilities. And, without a doubt, he’s engaging and funny and connects with everyone he meets. 

It’s easy to understand why he doesn’t take no for an answer, he doesn’t have to, who could say no to him?


Jane Hanauer:

Laguna’s reigning queen of “The Ripple Effect

By DIANE ARMITAGE

Photos by Mary Hurlbut

It’s interesting how one small event can create a ripple that affects hundreds, even thousands of lives. In many cases, when that event happens in your own life, you don’t ever recognize its significance.

Jane Hanauer, the owner of Laguna Beach Books, probably doesn’t.

Years ago, when she accepted a lunch date with a friend who lived in Laguna Beach, it created a chained series of events that have, quite frankly, led to the complete revitalization of a 4-block commercial district now nicknamed The H.I.P. District. And, at the hub of the District’s many successful commercial spokes is Laguna Beach Books – a significant ripple all its own. 

Now, if you were to present this “ripple” theory to Jane, she would gracefully chortle and flap a dismissive hand at you. She and her husband, Joe, would never take credit or expect accolades for such a gargantuan achievement in these few short years; the couple is as Midwest friendly and unpresuming as they come. 

The fact, though, remains: It all started with lunch. 

Here’s how it all went down:

The Ripple began in Three Arch Bay

After selling his Chicago-based real estate business to Coldwell Banker in 1983, Joe Hanauer took on CEO responsibilities, which brought him to Newport Beach’s Coldwell Banker headquarters. In 1986, with most of their brood tucked away in college, the couple moved to Newport with their youngest daughter, Elizabeth.

Shortly thereafter, Jane was invited to Laguna’s Three Arch Bay for lunch. She was so enamored with the lovely neighborhood that she was quick to introduce Joe to Laguna Beach, and they both fell in love with the town. 

“Newport Beach was fine, but Laguna Beach is a real town,” says Jane. “We’d spend our weekends walking everywhere and we loved it – it had this warm, village feel that we knew we wanted to be a part of.”  

In short order, they gave up their rental digs in Newport and purchased a home in Three Arch Bay.

Ripple #2

After enjoying more than a decade in their new “village,” another ripple occurred: In 2002, the old Pottery Shack property went on the market. 

In no time at all, the couple’s dinner conversations began to mull the potential of the property, and they wandered over (more than a few times) to ramble the iconic grounds. 

“At the core of this property was this little adobe cottage, maybe built around 1910 or 1920, that had been absorbed by the commercial activity around it,” says Jane. “We were looking at all sorts of ways to save it before we even purchased the property, and that was the telltale sign – we were really interested.”

Although the Pottery Shack property was not a registered historical landmark, the Hanauers worked tirelessly to save and maintain as much of the historic building as possible, even restoring the Shack’s front façade as they voluntarily dug underground to create a parking structure for expected shoppers. 

Click on photo for a larger image

 

Yep. The forest animals on top of the existing building had to be saved, too. “We never figured out why they were there in the first place, but Joe had them all restored and put back exactly as we’d found them. Some day we’ll get to the bottom of that mystery,” says Jane. 

Ripple #3: A step away from indie extinction

As the couple discussed commercial possibilities for the new Pottery Place, Jane told her husband that she was ready to start a bookstore. “When we were beginning to build in 2003, the independent bookstores were struggling to stay alive,” says Jane. 

“Bookstores are so important. I think we all have a responsibility to keep them from disappearing; they are a necessary footprint in our lives. Now, I can’t really go around telling people this if I don’t do something about it myself … so Laguna Beach Books was born.”

Having not been in bookstore retail before, Jane approached the project with the same “structured development” theme that she applies to her various board positions around town. Most of the time it worked. Some of the time it didn’t, which causes Jane and Manager Lisa Childers to crack up as they share some of their “learning experiences.”

“For the initial opening, we had a book buyer who convinced us that we needed to buy 7,000 calendars,” says Jane. “So, we’re thinking, ‘What’s a few calendars? They’re flat; they don’t take up much room’ … and then hundreds of boxes began to arrive, stuffed with calendars. There were so many of them, we couldn’t even walk through the store. And then … we missed the date to return them all. So … sometimes structured development can take a bit of a detour.”

When Laguna Beach Books opened in 2006, only 1,500 independent bookstores remained in the entire country. Shortly after the store’s opening, Laguna Beach’s other bookstore, Latitude 33, closed its doors. 

Jane remained undaunted. “When we heard bad news, we just made ourselves get busier.”

A local store with its own international Ripple Effect

Click on photo for a larger image

 

Today, with 7,000 book titles and a special order system that usually sees books arrive for customers within 48 hours, the little indie certainly equals large chain bookstores in the area.

Jane was quick to set up thriving relationships with the large resorts in town, and the store rolled out an assertive series of author signing events that has since mushroomed into nearly 150 events a year. The store also introduced a now-thriving monthly Book Club, and has recently instigated poetry-reading events for local poets. 

“We’re exploring ways to get more involved with young adult readers,” says Jane. “That reading market is tremendous and definitely on the rise, and that’s the kind of statistic I love to see. 

“We just need to find a way to sync with their schedules and support them in an engaging way,” she continues. 

Right energy creates exponential right energy

As Laguna Beach Books has thrived, so have its counterparts at the Pottery Place, from the lovely “anchor” of Sapphire Restaurant to various offerings of chocolates, home décor, food pantry and deli items, clothing and more.

More significant, however, is how the revitalization of the Pottery Place further revitalized business and traffic flow in a much larger, expansive circle. On any day of the week, the bustle is in play to the north with the three-story edifice housing The Heidelberg Café, Gina’s Pizza and numerous other restaurants and salons … to the Place’s southern retail neighbors and Ruben Flores’ Laguna Nursery a block further down … and even across the street where Casa del Camino’s Chris Keller joined forces with the Hanauers to further brand the H.I.P. District’s hipness. 

“You bring the right people in with the right kind of energy and positive aspiration and you’ll see other people with the same energy flock to be around them,” says Flores. “This is what Joe and Jane Hanauer are responsible for. 

“The moment you meet them, you know that they are the kind of people you want to do business next to! Their energy and positive enthusiasm is absolutely rallying”

Ripples #4-6

True “villagers” in every sense of the word, Joe and Jane have stepped into board roles for a number of non-profit interests in and around Laguna Beach, too. 

In the 1950s, Jane’s mother trod across every line imaginable to take her place as a leader in Planned Parenthood. In a nod of respect to her mom and the enduring organization, Jane is now in her third term as a board member for the Orange & San Bernardino Planned Parenthood organization.

In 2006, she also joined the Friendship Shelter’s board, and has recently finished serving two consecutive terms there. Then, in 2011, Jane stepped into a board position at the Laguna Art Museum, and is happily enthusiastic about supporting its many new developments.   

“My Mother used to quote someone who said, ‘You’re always entitled to your own opinion, but you’re not entitled to your own facts.’ So many times, people interpret change and development around them into their own set of facts, and those facts may not necessarily be correct or conducive to creating the best win-win for everyone,” she says.

“That’s why I get involved in these organizations. When you can help innovate positive change and disseminate the facts about these changes in a way that everyone can understand, you’re making a real difference.

“Really, it all comes down to making a difference in people’s lives,” she continues. “Take, for example, the Friendship Shelter. It may be a small organization, but if they can make a difference in even 100 people’s lives, that’s really something.”

Indeed, Jane Hanauer. What you’ve done is really something. 

(Hey, thanks for accepting that lunch date.) 

••••

A professional writer for 30 years, Diane Armitage is also the author of the popular book, The Insider’s Travel Guide: Laguna Beach’s Best

Shaena Stabler is the Owner, Publisher & Editor.

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Alexis Amaradio, Barbara Diamond, Dennis McTighe, Diane Armitage, Lynette Brasfield, Marrie Stone, Maggi Henrikson, Samantha Washer, and Suzie Harrison are our writers and/or columnists.

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